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Debut Novels Book Club > August 2018 : Sorry to Disrupt the Peace : Spoilers

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message 1: by Russell (new)

Russell | 166 comments Mod
Read the book? Tine to discuss. Please spoil away!


message 2: by Susan (new)

Susan | 5 comments This book was fantastic; I read it in one sitting.
The title encapsulates the themes of the novel ie:
1. As adopted visible minorities, Helen and her brother, being raised in a homogenous community (taunting and bullying at school).
2. The struggle to find a path in life. Helen found her way to NYC and found work that gave her purpose; the brother’s suicide was the solution to his purpose.
It is clear to the reader that Helen is on the autitistic spectrum. However, the author treats Helen with respect; as readers we do not laugh at Helen nor judge her. Instead, we accept Helen and follow along as she tries to understand her world and circumstances. I believe it’s Helen’s illness that allowed her to survive and thrive. Every obstacle that she faced (cruel rumours about her artwork, surviving in NY on little to no money and being oblivious to peoples’ judgements) she just shrugged off and soldiered on to the next place or interest without a thought about what was said or happened. She is a disrupter who survived.
The brother’s story is heartbreaking. What was the real reason why he was rejected as a donor of his ‘spare’ organs in an age of lengthy wait lists for organ transplants..race, gender, age, genetic anomaly...? The brother lived an ordinary life in the eyes of his family. Perhaps the expectation was Helen would take her own life instead of her brother. And, yet the brother did the extraordinary by
taking his own life to benefit the lives of others. Is the brother the true disrupter of peace or was it his sister?


message 3: by Kim (new)

Kim (nickinpa) | 2 comments This was an interesting interview with the author on the book. Apparently this first novel has some parallels to the author's own life. https://www.theguardian.com/books/201...


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