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Pride Reads - name fav YA LGBTQ > 21 - Favorite YA LGBTQ historical novel?

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message 1: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 16801 comments 21 - Favorite YA LGBTQ historical novel? (Preferably not historical fantasy - can you come up with a good real historical?)


message 2: by Iamshadow (new)

Iamshadow | 334 comments I'm trying to think of something YA. I know I would have been reading Sarah Waters at fifteen or sixteen had they been available to me, but I read Austen and Bronte and Dickens and Victor Hugo for fun, so I am probably an outlier and should not be counted. I definitely read Alice Walker - when I was in year 11 I used a book voucher I won in a school contest to buy The Colour Purple, because I'd been a fan of the film for years by that point. :)


message 3: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 16801 comments I read The Persian Boy when I was 14, but despite the young age of the MC as it opens, I wouldn't call it YA.


message 4: by Kaje (last edited Jun 21, 2018 04:23PM) (new)

Kaje Harper | 16801 comments There is also Seidman - set in the time of the Vikings, it has magic, but a lot of historical accurate context. So much YA historical is AU-fantasy

Oh, I know - The Celestial - this is a non-fantasy story of two gay teens in the gold-rush era. Very well done.


message 5: by K (new)

K (k-polipetl) | 4090 comments YA LGBTQ historicals are very hard to find without the fantasy element.

One I have to read that comes highly recommended is Beloved Pilgrim by Christopher Hawthorne Moss


message 6: by Iamshadow (new)

Iamshadow | 334 comments Question - what's the upper limit on 'historical'? Because my brain naturally gravitates to the nineteenth century, but if we're talking 20+ years ago, then stuff like Grrrls on the Side becomes eligible...


message 7: by Jay (new)

Jay | 136 comments I recognize anything in the past is historical, but I think of it as something older than roughly a century. I know "period piece" can refer to works set in older times (Victorian, etc), but I like the adjective period to refer to an otherwise contemporaneous story set in 20th century decades such as the 80s, 60s, 50s, etc which have well-known (sometimes stereotypical) pop culture (music, fashion, etc) that most people today can recognize from their consumption of audio-visual media (movies and TV). In fact, IMHO, a good dividing line on what fiction I'd consider historical is works set in eras that occurred before the mainstream adoption of AV recording technology.


message 8: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 16801 comments There is no consensus - some use it for any work in which there would be no living contemporaries (ie. 100 years +) - but I have a short story about 2 guys in college in the 1980's that is on readers' historical shelves. In YA, I'm tempted to give it a pretty wide latitude, since there is so little available. At least through the 60's - an era not lived by today's teens or most of their parents.


message 9: by Jay (new)

Jay | 136 comments I've been curious how YA readers (not just readers of YA) like stories such as yours which are set in recent history, away from modern trappings such as smartphones, the internet, etc (conveniences or annoyances depending on one's point of view). Do actual young adults feel stories set in those eras are too old/distant to feel relevant to them?


message 10: by Noah (new)

Noah | 4 comments It's not quite YA, but I loved White Houses by Amy Bloom


message 11: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 16801 comments Jay wrote: "I've been curious how YA readers (not just readers of YA) like stories such as yours which are set in recent history, away from modern trappings such as smartphones, the internet, etc (conveniences..."

It's an interesting question, and hard to answer - I imagine it varies a lot. My own son in his teens was very fond of historical fiction, although he was reading mainly the straight stuff since there isn't much LGBTQ .


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