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June 2018: Magical Realism > The Moor's Last Sigh by Salman Rushdie

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message 1: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1545 comments 4 stars
Let me start off by saying that I love Rushdie so I came into this knowing I would most likely really like this book. Rushdie's books are great examples of magical realism (most of them at least) and this was no exception. The magic was so subtle in this book that it felt like part of everyday experience.

The Moor's Last Sigh was shortlisted for the Man Booker Award and on the surface it is a family saga that tells the strange and tragic story of a prominent family of Cochinese spice merchants. In reality, the book is the story of modern India. The book is filled with references (religious/political/historical) and symbolism. As with any Rushdie novel, in order to fully understand the book you must be willing to look things up, spend time digesting, and really analyze the surface story.

It took me about a month to read this book. Every name, place, event had meaning and was tied to the developing story with it's clashes between religions and various groups. It's certainly not an easy read and while I enjoyed it, I also struggled through parts because I did spend a lot of time on google looking up various names and events. I'm pretty sure even despite all my background research, I missed a fair amount.

But I love the intelligence of his writing and the way he uses humor to make an intellectual read more accessible and enjoyable.


message 2: by KateNZ (new)

KateNZ | 2666 comments Such a good review, Jen. This sounds excellent


message 3: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1545 comments KateNZ wrote: "Such a good review, Jen. This sounds excellent"

Thanks Kate. It's certainly an interesting book if you are able to take the time to read it slowly and research while you read!


message 4: by Tracy (new)

Tracy (tstan) | 1237 comments You can’t rush a Rushdie novel! Every book I read by him makes me appreciate him even more. He packs so much into each story, and it seems effortless on his part.
He’s certainly not for everyone, but I love his sense of humor and I don’t mind having to look stuff up- I learn more that way.

That being said, Book Twin, I’m not surprised you liked this! I liked the art references and the word play. And, as always, the abundant and colorful characters- that mother!


message 5: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1545 comments Tracy wrote: "You can’t rush a Rushdie novel! Every book I read by him makes me appreciate him even more. He packs so much into each story, and it seems effortless on his part.
He’s certainly not for everyone, ..."


I think you have bumped Book Worm to "sister (older/younger) status" and taken over twin status. I did enjoy the art references and word play too.


message 6: by Tracy (new)

Tracy (tstan) | 1237 comments Jen wrote: "Tracy wrote: "You can’t rush a Rushdie novel! Every book I read by him makes me appreciate him even more. He packs so much into each story, and it seems effortless on his part.
He’s certainly not ..."

I suppose we could be triplets, though we may have to add Susie in. She likes the same books, too. So quadruplets...


message 7: by Susie (new)

Susie | 4488 comments I’d love to be a quad with y’all! I am ashamed to admit that I’ve not read any Rushdie. I absolutely must. Which one would you recommend I start with? A friend who is my in real life book twin has said Midnight’s Children.


message 8: by Tracy (new)

Tracy (tstan) | 1237 comments Susie wrote: "I’d love to be a quad with y’all! I am ashamed to admit that I’ve not read any Rushdie. I absolutely must. Which one would you recommend I start with? A friend who is my in real life book twin has ..."
I loved Midnight’s Children, and Haroun and the Sea Of Stories. But I’ve liked all I’ve read by him.


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