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June 2018: Magical Realism > A Magical Match: 1 Star

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message 1: by Kimberly (new)

Kimberly Ann (auntie-nanuuq) | 753 comments A Magical Match (A Witchcraft Mystery #9) by Juliet Blackwell

A Magical Match, Juliet Blackwell



I seriously never thought I'd give Blackwell 1 ★

Lily Ivory, owner of Aunt Cora's Closet Vintage Clothing & witch is about to get married to Sailor... but first she must discover who took on Sailor's physical appearance & killed Tristan Dupree, a man from her past who at one time was her father's protege & evil cohort, plan a neighborhood fund raiser for the local woman's shelter, and figure out how she is bound to a magical prophecy of great proportions as the communities of power align for or against in good vs. evil.

Helping Lily to clear Sailor is his Romany cousin & thorn in Lily's side, Patience, and Aiden one of the main practitioners in San Francisco. In addition, Lily's grandmother, grandmother's coven, & mother are on their way for the wedding all with intent of their own.

Magical Realism?

* Lily Ivory is able to mix herbal spells & protection charms
* Lily's grandmother, Graciela, a practitioner, was Lily's mentor
* Lily's father was able to call forth demons
* Lily's fiancée, Sailor & his family are Romany and all psychics
* Lily's best friend, Bronwyn, is a practicing Wiccan and member of a coven

That being said:

Although I really enjoy paranormal & magical realism, genre books.... What I Do Not enjoy is when an author has a long-term character, who has powerful gifts and remains a dummy-head....

I guess there are people like that, who just half-arse their gifts, but I then want to know why would that be? These type of books contain mystery, murder, power, & romance, and the characters continually are involved in the first two, which would mean that their gifts only grow stronger (which they do), but the characters seem to get dumber & dumber as their power increases... So that confuses me.

There are several flaws in this book and several loose ends, which also bothered me. The fact that the main character, still questions herself & her knowing is annoying, as well as the fact that when she has to chastise her protege & her familiar, she feels guilty and back-pedals. So I'm thinking that this will be the end of the series for me.


message 2: by JoLene (last edited Jun 08, 2018 10:30PM) (new)

JoLene (trvl2mtns) | 1532 comments Yikes, sounds like one to avoid. For me, this sounds like a normal fantasy book since it is about witches. How do you define fantasy vs magical realism?

It also sounds like the author is trying to stretch the series too long. That is one reason why I seem to prefer trilogies vs long running series.


message 3: by Kimberly (new)

Kimberly Ann (auntie-nanuuq) | 753 comments JoLene wrote: "Yikes, sounds like one to avoid. For me, this sounds like a normal fantasy book since it is about witches. How do you define fantasy vs magical realism?

It also sounds like the author is trying to..."


As I am a licensed metaphysical "practitioner"... I look closely at the various types of practices in a book. This is borderline, but none-the-less "realism", because it includes fictional situations & characters.

I am always careful to acclaim or denounce books based on metaphysical (beyond the physical) realm. Does that make sense?

I like series, there are several I still read.... but when pronounced stupidity of a character becomes evident, then I usually give up and find something else to read.

In the case of Juliet Blackwell, I have to say I followed her longer than Victoria Laurie


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