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Horses and Farms For Fiction Writers
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message 1: by Jim (new) - added it

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 2283 comments I'm a farmer and horseman with a life-long love of fiction, but all too often it’s obvious that an author has relied on movies for their information about horses and farms. Hollywood has dubbed in the sounds of squealing car wheels on gravel roads and they tend to handle horses and farms even more poorly. Books rely on my knowledge and imagination, so these errors are far more glaring.

I wrote this to give authors some insight into the intimate details of horses and life on a farm so that they can write better for me. I've tried to be completely honest. Some of what I’ll relate is gross, explicit, and may even horrify you, but it is part of everyday life for horsemen and other farmers that I know.

It's available on Amazon or Smashwords in various ebook formats only since it contains a lot of hyperlinks to relatively safe sites (Wikipedia & such) for further exploration.


message 2: by Bobby (new)

Bobby Bermea (beirutwedding) | 412 comments No kidding? NEAT, Jim! Did you read The Sport of Kings? How'd she do?


message 3: by Jim (new) - added it

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 2283 comments There are several, but I have not read any of them. Some authors do fine since they have horses. Dick Francis was a jockey, so his murder mysteries portray the British racing scene well. Clare O'Beara, Janny Wurts, & Catharina Marcus are all fine horsewomen & write like it. Even David Eddings isn't too bad, although he skirts my limits of hyperbole with Faran. At least pays attention to the horses & makes them out to be the characters they often are.

The same complaints & comments have come up here on GR so often over the past decade that I started keeping notes. I expanded them into this book. It's under $3 so any aspiring author can afford it.


message 4: by Deborah (new)

Deborah (goodreadscomdeborah_jay) | 21 comments Just took a look at it - great job!
I started doing something similar several years ago but didn't keep it simple enough, and gave up when I got mired with the differences between European and US terminology as I naturally use European, being in the UK.
I hope lots of writers buy it - I'll give it a plug on my website.


message 5: by Jim (new) - added it

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 2283 comments Thanks, Deborah! I don't know much about the European side of things being a casual US rider. The biggest difference for me is not using hands. Centimeters make such a huge difference there. Here horse height is never really compared to human height due to the different measurements while it's unavoidable across the pond. It really makes more sense, but takes the flavor out of it for me.

I don't know why we can't switch to metric here in the US. I had to learn it in the Army & it's not that big a deal. For 40 years or more we've been dithering about it, so I have to keep 2 sets of tools. Worse, both my pickup & tractor were made in Canada so almost all the bolts are SAE, but there are a few metric ones tossed in just to really make the job tough. Grrr!


message 6: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 6 comments This book is a great resource! Grab it and dig in, totally worth the investment!


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

Jim wrote: "I don't know much about the European side of things being a casual US rider. The biggest difference for me is not using hands...."

I puzzled at that statement for some time before I remembered hands is a measure of a horse's height!


message 8: by Jim (new) - added it

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 2283 comments Janny wrote: "This book is a great resource! Grab it and dig in, totally worth the investment!"

Thanks, Janny!

G33z3r, I did make that confusing. 'Look, Ma. No hands!'
;)


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