James Joyce Symposium discussion

18 views
Dubliners > Structure in Dubliners

Comments Showing 1-50 of 63 (63 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1

message 1: by Mark (last edited Jun 02, 2018 04:17PM) (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
If Joyce had been able to publish Dubliners when he felt it was ready we would have 14 rather than 15 stories in the collection. So in discussing the structure of the book we chose to deal with only the original 14 stories and leave the consideration of the fifteenth story: The Dead for a later time.
To begin, the order of composition of the stories and their final arrangement into book form are not quite the same.


message 2: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Hi, Mark! -)
I'm wondering on the accuracy of the information given in your first sentence, because based on the introduction I read in the book I've just purchased couple of days ago, Joyce sent a manuscript of 12 short stories at the end of 1905 to an English publisher, hoping for early publication. Should we understand that actually he didn't feel it was quite ready by then?
Also, why should The Dead be out of the thread? IF it's part of the collection, then it is perfect to go together as is.
Thanks for the last note, I've already noticed the discrepancy between the order of composition and final arrangement. Why this happened so? -)


message 3: by Mark (last edited Jun 02, 2018 08:03PM) (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
It's funny, I think, but going over my notes this evening after I had already started writing I became aware of my error. Twelve is correct. The original plan was for twelve stories. Delays in finding a willing publisher saw two more stories come into being: Two Gallants which gets placed 6th; and Little Cloud which gets placed 8th. So now we have 14, but he still can't find someone to publish the book. For me, the 15th story, the Dead has more in common with his play Exiles than it does the 14 short stories: it was written later. But since nothing had been published, and he had it ready he added it to the collection. In my little, unfinished essay I didn't mean to exclude the Dead from consideration: it is the last story and got added to the collection because he had it and he wanted it in print. There is however a strong thematic link between the first 14 story that was there before 15th was ever written. (But you've already read all this in the introduction.) The structure I see with the 14 originals groups them: 3.4.4.3. Further explication will have to wait until tomorrow. - )


message 4: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Wait a bit, please. I haven't said I have finished reading the introduction. It seems pretty lengthy for a start. Also, it's just my first start into it and when I was on it there was a bit of strong sun falling on my eyes, thus this kept me on ruminating on a single pages for longer time. I only finished 5 pages. -)
So, I am doubly counting on learning out more from you, here. I cannot trust third parties, obviously. But, further explanation is expected to come not today as your day, but your day as my day today. -)


message 5: by Mark (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
Cool. Thanks for the confidence. - )


message 6: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Mark wrote: "Cool. Thanks for the confidence. - )"

Thank you for keeping this course for apprentices like me, much obliged. -) I am sure it benefits lots of us, too.


message 7: by Mark (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
Mihaella wrote: "Mark wrote: "Cool. Thanks for the confidence. - )"

Thank you for keeping this course for apprentices like me, much obliged. -) I am sure it benefits lots of us, too."

I can't imagine anything more fun! - )


message 8: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Mark wrote: "Mihaella wrote: "Mark wrote: "Cool. Thanks for the confidence. - )"

Thank you for keeping this course for apprentices like me, much obliged. -) I am sure it benefits lots of us, too."
I can't imag..."


me neither! besides the cartoons. -)
I hope to cover 5 more pages from Introduction for today. finishing it would be a nice ambition, too. -)


message 9: by Mark (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
Mihaella wrote: "Mark wrote: "Mihaella wrote: "Mark wrote: "Cool. Thanks for the confidence. - )"

Thank you for keeping this course for apprentices like me, much obliged. -) I am sure it benefits lots of us, too."..."

You read. I'll sleep. And we'll rendezvous later on. - )


message 10: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Fair enough: new times, new rules! -)
After employing fulminating glances on the Introduction, I eventually reached to the paragraph saying that the first of the stories is The Sisters and what was to be last in collection is Grace; The Dead being finished and added subsequently in 1907, some time after the completion of A Little Cloud which was the 14 story to be finished in mid-1906 and Two Gallants #13 by Feb 1906.
I seem not to have understood Why would the printer or publisher have the stories rotated differently on the final issue of the book, than the way they saw the light of day?
Also, why there is almost a decade before Joyce saw his book in print? The Introduction seems very evasive on this.


message 11: by Mark (last edited Jun 03, 2018 05:03AM) (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
First a question. Is the author of the introduction identified? If so who?
The order of the composition and the arrangement of the stories for publication was solely the responsibility of the author! More on that soon.
The reason for the delay, the reason that it took ten years to go from a manuscript to printed and bound and for sale book was fear! Fear on the part of the publisher - it, the book, was once printed and ready to be bound, and then destroyed - of law suits: for libel mostly: the names of real Dublin citizens being used in the text; and the fear of backlash from the Catholic church, the media and governmental agencies responsible for protecting the people from immoral and indecent printed material!


message 12: by Mark (last edited Jun 03, 2018 07:40AM) (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
Ok. While my coffee cools down to a drinkable temperature we will try and make some sense out of the difference between the order the stories were written in and the order the author used to present them to the world.
So: first he writes four stories:
The Sisters
Eveline
After the Race
Clay
Then he writes eight more:
Boarding House
Counterparts
A Painful Case
Ivy Day
An Encounter
A Mother
Araby
Grace
So now we have twelve which he now sorts to suit his purposes.

The Sister was always first, but now he brings An Encounter written 9th up to #2; and like wise Araby written 11th becomes #3. These three stories: The Sisters, an Encounter, and Araby have a strong unifying element. They are called the "I" stories. The narrator in all three stories seems to be the same, unidentified, young boy. (Who only appears in these three stories; though he may have a cameo in #9.) So, because of this move the original 2nd and 3rd stories (Eveline and After the Race) get pushed down to become 4 and 5. Then, for less obvious reason he takes Clay, the original 4th story and moves it down to the 8th spot, sandwiched between the two, to my mind biggest, impact wise, stories in the collection: Counterparts and A Painful Case. Clay is an odd story: short, unattractive and sort of sad. This new arrangement: putting the small, ugly Clay in between the two blockbuster Counterparts and A Painful Case reminds me a lot of Beethoven's Piano Sonata #22, in the sense that it is itself sandwiched between two of his blockbusters: #21 Waldstein and #23 Appassionata. I think the reason Joyce puts Clay here is to sort of give the reader, if not a rest, at least a distinctive change of pace, between two of his most powerful tales. Anyway, with these moves we come to the collection of twelve stories originally sent to the publisher:
The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Boarding House
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day
A Mother
Grace

Now, since he can't get anyone to print the book in the form and with the exact wording, they were, the publishers, always asking him to just change a few words or delete a few sentences, here and there and everything would then be fine, and he always replied the same: "drop dead". Anyway, because of the delays two new stories come into being: Two Gallants and Little Cloud which are not simply tacked on at the end, but rather get squeezed into the existing stack of twelve this way: Two Gallants becomes the 6th story, and Little Cloud becomes the 8th. So ... I need break. More soon. - )


message 13: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Mark wrote: "First a question. Is the author of the introduction identified? If so who?
The order of the composition and the arrangement of the stories for publication was solely the responsibility of the autho..."


Yes, please. I like answering to questions. -)
This is a Penguin Books edition with an Introduction and notes by Terence Brown, Trinity College, Dublin.
It's good that Joyce took the final accountability for stories' arrangement in the final print. Don't think the printer and publisher should intervene in this decision.
I eventually finished all Introduction and found a bit more of details to help my understanding. It says somewhere that indeed the author assumed this order of the stories in print so to follow this: 'childhood, adolescence, maturity and public life. .. encouraging the 'critic' to read the Dubliners, not as a series of discrete stories, but as a work of complex structure in which the characters unknowingly arrange themselves in a modern version of an ancient trope: the ages of man.'
Thanks for explaining the reasons behind the delayed publication. I guess it is a bit understandable if names of real people were used in the book. I'm wondering how would I react to such a case. -)


message 14: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Mark wrote: "Ok. While my coffee cools down to a drinkable temperature we will try and make some sense out of the difference between the order the stories were written in and the order the author used to presen..."

oh goodness! let's seek refuge in a break... yes! I will enjoy a lemonade. In the meantime I will digest your the above much longer lecture. -)


message 15: by Mark (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
Mihaella wrote: "Mark wrote: "Ok. While my coffee cools down to a drinkable temperature we will try and make some sense out of the difference between the order the stories were written in and the order the author u..."
Cool! - )


message 16: by Mark (last edited Jun 03, 2018 10:14AM) (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
Mihaella wrote: "Mark wrote: "First a question. Is the author of the introduction identified? If so who?
The order of the composition and the arrangement of the stories for publication was solely the responsibility..."


I apologize, again, unnecessarily, I missed seeing this message. (As an aside, I will keep in mind, "I like answering to questions." for some future use.) Anyway, mr Brown's remark about the childhood, adolescence, maturity and public life ... is a tired and often used, poor explanation of threads that may weave through these stories. I don't recommend paying it much heed.
Libel was just one of the concerns: there are also anti British remarks and also hints of some sort of unsavory activities: it was 1905.
Anyway, the first story, The Sisters there has been more critical commentary about this one story than all the others put together. It was originally published, in a different version, in a farmers almanac magazine. If you are curious, you can google wikipedia for the Homestead version of The Sisters. It is significantly shorter, but reading it and comparing it to the book version gives you an insight, by noticing what gets added, to the workings of the author's mind. Specifically, there are three italicized words in the opening paragraph of the story that have rendered the critics incoherent for over a 100 years. Happy reading! - )


message 17: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Mark wrote: "Mihaella wrote: "Mark wrote: "First a question. Is the author of the introduction identified? If so who?
The order of the composition and the arrangement of the stories for publication was solely t..."


Rest assured that I am not gluing anything yet to my long-term archive. Just moving ahead cautiously. I am keen on finding as many details and as many shades of the stories to allow a better and deeper understanding, not necessarily one that was already consumed before.
I'll proceed as per your kind suggestion. Reading comparatively always gives a higher pleasure and interesting reading experience.
Thank you very much, Mark! -) I'll write this up on my in-debt list. -)


message 18: by Mark (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
The tutor bows appreciatively to his protege. "My dear, we've only just begun," he politely replies.
Read slowly and carefully, but also for fun. We're not studying the book, we've come for the pleasure it may bring.
By the way; you read English, and you write very good English, when do you get to speak English? - )


message 19: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Mark wrote: "The tutor bows appreciatively to his protege. "My dear, we've only just begun," he politely replies.
Read slowly and carefully, but also for fun. We're not studying the book, we've come for the ple..."


Now this calls for a pirouette from protege side and then a soft reverence. -)
The gift of reputable words always gives the intoxication by the blossoms' fragrance. We can conclude that the deeper one thinks, the more delicate one's feelings and the nearer will come to the true essence of one's being. Or, the idea of reading is to be rich in meaning, deep, wonderful, pregnant. Above all, Fun is the core ingredient, no doubt! I, at least, will never be a scholar even if, apparently, that can be imitated.
As for speaking English, I always speak inside out while I write down -) Sound seems intrinsically linked with seeing and feeling. This reminds me that, for example, at work, very few understand accurately my writing [it's true I seem to complicate things...but nowadays I'm doing 'daily management system' for correcting this deficiency] thus we reconnect via phone/video calls, so getting an extended chance for more speaking. Nonetheless, that's a very limited channel. No comparison with GR, whatsoever! -)


message 20: by Mark (last edited Jun 04, 2018 04:16PM) (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
The humble tutor blushed ever so slightly in recognition of the pirouette. "We will learn to love Joyce together, my dear," he whispered encouragingly. Then bowed.
- )


message 21: by Mark (last edited Jun 20, 2018 09:38AM) (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
Just for you! - )
#1.
https://youtu.be/9Ow08K5l7iA


message 22: by Mark (last edited Jun 14, 2018 10:14PM) (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
As has been observed, the first three stories, the "I" stories set themselves apart by the character of the unnamed boy narrator: the hero in all three. The Sisters is a very difficult story to become friendly with. An Encounter is a bit creepy; and Araby is about un-requited young love.

Then come the four stories: Eveline, After the Races, Two Gallants, The Boarding House. Eveline is the most famous, and the earliest written. After the Races is my least favorite. Two Gallants has a hotly debated ending. And The Boarding House is a familiar story.

Then come, to my mind, the strength of the collection: In the two premier stories Counterparts and A Painful Case Joyce deploys his two most complex characters: Farrington and Duffy: men much older than than himself: The big stories are separated by the "old" story Clay: much different in nature than those around it.

And then Joyce writes the last of the original 14 stories : A Little Cloud which he inserts as the eighth story, to act as an introduction to the next three: creating a second group of four: A Little Cloud, Counterparts, Clay, and A Painful Case.
A Little Cloud is a powerful story on it's own: touching on marriage, and drinking and child abuse, just like Counterparts does.

The last three stories do indeed employee adults as heroes. In Ivy Day the subject is nostalgia. And in A Mother the subject is gender, I think? And Grace concludes the original 14 stories, with an adult version, in a sense, of the first story: examining the question of real and superstitious roll of candles in our lives.


message 23: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Mark wrote: "For you! - )
https://youtu.be/9Ow08K5l7iA"


Thank you very much! -) A very lovely piece of music to go along with the reading experience. Not precisely adapted for Dubliners. -)


message 24: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Mark wrote: "As has been observed, the first three stories, the "I" stories set themselves apart by the character of the unnamed boy narrator: the hero in all three. The Sisters is a very difficult story to bec..."

Oh, Goodness! -) This is a High infusion to be tackled instantly. I have decided to put a bit aside the book, after finishing the Introduction, and addressed to his Correspondence instead. I was much curious what has been inside the author's mind and what were the circumstances he struggled with when this collection of stories was work in progress. I found out some interesting and fascinating stuff already.
By the way, did you know that he first invited Nora for a a rendevous on 15th June, but for a peculiar reason, she couldn't make it, so they eventually met on 16th June which is also the day of the entire action that is consummed within Ulysses. Nice detail. -)


message 25: by Mark (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
It is a nice detail. - )
I understand aside.


message 26: by Mark (last edited Jun 15, 2018 09:44AM) (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
Mihaella wrote: "Mark wrote: "For you! - )
https://youtu.be/9Ow08K5l7iA"

Thank you very much! -) A very lovely piece of music to go along with the reading experience. Not precisely adapted for Dubliners. -)"

I'm sorry, I didn't see this before. So glad you liked the music! Has nothing to do with Dubliners: just used this thread to deliver it.


message 27: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Mind you, I've just finished The Sisters. It feels like the Sphinx must solve its own riddle. -) So, after "looking high up and low down", why is that father Flynn "wide-awake and laughing-like softly to himself"?


message 28: by Mark (last edited Jun 15, 2018 09:56AM) (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
You caught me napping! - ) You mentioned "aside." Let me look at my book. brb.


message 29: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Mark wrote: "You caught me napping! - ) You mentioned "aside." Let me look at my book. brb."

What book is that: The Oracle of Delphi? -)


message 30: by Mark (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
If you go back nine paragraphs: beginning with: "Eliza took out her handkerchief ..." and read to the end .... The priest sitting alone in the dark, in a box, quietly laughing to himself seems to have become a bit mentally unbalanced?
Eliza says of her brother, "And then his life was, you might say, crossed."


message 31: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Mark wrote: "If you go back nine paragraphs: beginning with: "Eliza took out her handkerchief ..." and read to the end .... The priest sitting alone in the dark, in a box, quietly laughing to himself seems to h..."

Yes, all that is duly captured. Still, why? Did he have an epiphany? -)


message 32: by Mark (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
"The duties of the priesthood was too much for him."

"It was that chalice he broke .... That was the beginning of it."

"That affected his mind," she said. "After that he began to mope by himself, ..."

"So then, of course, when they saw that, that made them think that there was something gone wrong with him ...."

No, I don't think the priest had an epiphany sitting there in the dark.
I think the priest is having a "breakdown".


message 33: by Mark (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
Mihaella wrote: "Mark wrote: "You caught me napping! - ) You mentioned "aside." Let me look at my book. brb."

What book is that: The Oracle of Delphi? -)"

I didn't see this either! Your so funny! Dubliners! - )


message 34: by Mark (last edited Jun 20, 2018 09:39AM) (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
Just for you! - )
#2.
https://youtu.be/cOWq8adpgKg


message 35: by Mark (last edited Jun 20, 2018 09:40AM) (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
Just for you. - )
#3.
https://youtu.be/Xrkq-yBVcQQ


message 36: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Mark wrote: "For you! - )
https://youtu.be/cOWq8adpgKg"


Thank you, Mark! -)
Peace and silence.


message 37: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Mark wrote: "For you. - )
https://youtu.be/Xrkq-yBVcQQ"


So very lovely, liked it! Thanks doubly! -)
As a return per investment, I've passed successfully number 2: An encounter. Apparently, I enjoyed it. -)


message 38: by Mark (last edited Jun 18, 2018 07:07PM) (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
Mihaella wrote: "Mark wrote: "For you. - )
https://youtu.be/Xrkq-yBVcQQ"

So very lovely, liked it! Thanks doubly! -)
As a return per investment, I've passed successfully number 2: An encounter. Apparently, I enjoy..."

Your welcome! - ) Glad you liked the music. Glad you liked the second story. You do so constantly amaze me! You always say just the right thing! - )


message 39: by Mark (last edited Jun 20, 2018 09:40AM) (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
Just for you! - )
#4.
https://youtu.be/HIYTpAueMMg


message 40: by Mark (last edited Jun 20, 2018 09:41AM) (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
Just for you! - )
#5.
https://youtu.be/FAoxkVQ5NDA


message 41: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Mark wrote: "Just for you! - )
#5.
https://youtu.be/FAoxkVQ5NDA"


Dear Mark, I am visited by the feeling that you are going to re-make the Chamber Music, originally revigorating Joyce's verses. I like your profound and solid sense of order. The numbering system leaves a complete page of history behind.
Thank you for the latest music sessions! -) So very you and so very kind of you!


message 42: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments I moved on also on the reading front and I must admit that with each new story I get a new sense of enjoyment, deeper and stronger. Araby - very lovely as being myself 'oriental', Eveline - deeply emotional and so realistic, After the Race and Two Gallants - extremely fun to read although they are not comic in the usual way.
I surely like the writing style. It reminds me a bit more of how I used to compose "business letters" some decade ago. -)


message 43: by Mark (last edited Jun 21, 2018 10:50AM) (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
Your welcome, Miha! - )

I want to draw your attention to #4 in particular. Beethoven published three sets of the bagatelles: Op.33, Op.119, Op.126.
They are groups of short little piano pieces. #2 from above is the first of 11 in the Op.119 group. #3 is the very famous (For Elise) which he actually wrote for a young female student: it stands by itself. #4 is the fourth of seven pieces that make up the Op.33 group. It's written in an A-B-A form, which you probably noticed: there is a first melody, and then a change to a second different melody, and then a return to the first melody to finish. It's been a favorite for a long time. What has always thrilled me about it is the change: the contrast! between the first melody and the second. The second melody is so different, so unexpected, so moody and introspective, but in a positive way!
I do hope that you enjoy these pieces often; there are many more to come! - )
(I played #4 last night! It helped me to close my eyes!)


message 44: by Mark (last edited Jun 21, 2018 11:02AM) (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
Mihaella wrote: "I moved on also on the reading front and I must admit that with each new story I get a new sense of enjoyment, deeper and stronger. Araby - very lovely as being myself 'oriental', Eveline - deeply ..."
There is no end to the ways you make me happy. I'm so thrilled you are enjoying Joyce!
Ps. The controversy associated with the ending of Two Gallants is the question as to where did the gold coin the servant girl brings out of the house and gives to Corley come from? My reading has always been it was the girl's personal savings, but many modern critics like to argue that she stole it. H'm?
Joyce just paints his pictures. He doesn't explain them. What we make of them is up to us. Sort of like real life. - )
That's a very interesting comment about your "business letters". would you care to expand on that?


message 45: by Mark (last edited Jun 21, 2018 05:42PM) (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
Mihaella wrote: "I moved on also on the reading front and I must admit that with each new story I get a new sense of enjoyment, deeper and stronger. Araby - very lovely as being myself 'oriental', Eveline - deeply ..."

Eveline is one of the most famous of the collection. She, the character, gets severely criticized these days for not getting on the ship. Yes, I like Araby too. Reading it from the boys point of view: the anger with oneself for thinking, for imagining that real life would turn out like your dreams.


message 46: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Mark wrote: "Your welcome, Miha! - )

I want to draw your attention to #4 in particular. Beethoven published three sets of the bagatelles: Op.33, Op.119, Op.126.
They are groups of short little piano pieces. #2..."


Hi, Mark! -)
Thank you for this treatise on Chamber Music - chapter dedicated to Beethoven. To be frank I am not gifted with any musical analytical skills but I do enjoy greatly listening to this kind of music. Once in a while, it acts as a balsam-like remedy. -)


message 47: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Mark wrote: "Mihaella wrote: "I moved on also on the reading front and I must admit that with each new story I get a new sense of enjoyment, deeper and stronger. Araby - very lovely as being myself 'oriental', ..."

For the time being I'm enjoying these stories for the pure and simple act of reading experience. I'm not focused on solving out riddles. I let this come later, if need be.
Regarding the writing style, I was referring to my being pleasantly addicted to writing 'classic' business letters as per the standard rules. I used to like it very much during faculty [I even bought specialized books to get the best training on it] and applied it heavily during my first years of professional activity. I seem to have had a similarity with Joyce in the sense of composing the letter body. Entangling the commercial words with the 'literature-stuff related words'. It was a good thing to do. Everyone loved it and delivered the expected results.
Nowadays I am however more compressed: few have time to read 'detailed' letters. Optimization and competitiveness seem the drivers, thus I have adjusted my style accordingly. Of course, I am still fondly remembering the old times and once in a while I give in and let it shine again. -)


message 48: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla  | 27 comments Mark wrote: "Mihaella wrote: "I moved on also on the reading front and I must admit that with each new story I get a new sense of enjoyment, deeper and stronger. Araby - very lovely as being myself 'oriental', ..."

I am on The Boarding House now. Started it on last Friday on my way to work. Might finish it tomorrow. I decided to read Joyce in the mornings, at least the stories for the present time. One story should be one way to work. On the back way I don't read because I enjoy walking more. -)
Eveline is the one I liked best so far. It had a direct impact and sealing was done perfectly. For a bunch of different but still solid reasons. -)


message 49: by Mark (last edited Jun 24, 2018 07:46AM) (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
Mihaella wrote: "Mark wrote: "Your welcome, Miha! - )

I want to draw your attention to #4 in particular. Beethoven published three sets of the bagatelles: Op.33, Op.119, Op.126.
They are groups of short little pia..."

I apologize. I didn't mean to sound technical. My love of classical music is just a love, not a study. Yes, a balsam, or for me an escape to another world. - )


message 50: by Mark (new)

Mark André  | 160 comments Mod
Mihaella wrote: "Mark wrote: "Mihaella wrote: "I moved on also on the reading front and I must admit that with each new story I get a new sense of enjoyment, deeper and stronger. Araby - very lovely as being myself..."
I apologize for asking questions. Your quite right reading is just for fun. Yes, the classic business letter. An Art form for sure. - )


« previous 1
back to top