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Practical Pagan > The Nature of Evil

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message 1: by Little (new)

Little Miss Esoteric (littlemissesoteric) | 1116 comments The nature of Evil. Does it exist in your world view, and if so, how?


message 2: by Wren (new)

Wren  (wrenreaders) i dont believe in evil as a noun, (i.e there is evil here) but more of an adjective (i.e that was very evil of you).


message 3: by Gavin (new)

Gavin White | 21 comments For me it is essentially a human trait with no objective reality in its own right and certainly not a universal force. Like 'sin' it is a concept best moved on from.


message 4: by Jay (new)

Jay Hawke (jayjordanhawke) Wow, what a great question! I don't believe in evil as a transcendent phenomenon. But it exists in this realm, as people who are cut off from inner reality act from a place of fear.


PJ Who Once Was Peejay | 336 comments There is evil in the world, yes. I have known evil people, though fortunately, not many. But I think of evil as more of a sickness than a metaphysical thing—people raised a certain way, or born without essential triggers of conscience in their brains, et al. Yet even as I make that statement, I feel the urge to backtrack from it somewhat.

See, the rational, Western, liberal, inclusive part of me firmly holds that sickness belief about evil. Another part of me has just enough experience with something Other to wonder if I really know what I'm talking about.

Do I believe in the Devil? I don't think so. Even the superstitious part of me has trouble swallowing that one. But do I believe in a form of impersonal evil that has nothing to do with human nature? I kind of do. There are things in this world that are darker than dark. What they are and where they come from I can't say, but I don't think they've ever been human. Or maybe they were human so long ago that all that is humanly relatable has been frozen away and smashed to bits.

Hell, if it exists (and I don't really buy that one, either), is not a hot place. It's a cold, dark place without love or illumination. Mostly, I think it's of our own making, a place that spawns these dark things in the world and in ourselves. And yet...


message 6: by Amy (new)

Amy I think this is a very good question. I don't believe in anytything superstitious around this adverb. Many people see the world only as black and white, which is nonsese.

I believe what my book says. There are many shades of gray. No one can be fully one sided. We all have some "Good" and "Bad" in us. It depends on what do we do with them.

To me evil is only a word people started to describe all those terrible deeds only humanity is capable of. Like murder, rape, torturing others and animals. Just people without a morl compas, conscience,....

And I also don't believe in the devil, hell, or the heaven. I believe there is something after we die, some sort of afterlife. But it isn't eaither of these. And I won't speculate what it is.

But I agree with Peejay. If there, by some chance, should be a hell it is a cold lonely place. People thre aren't tortured for their "sins", but are driven mad by eternal nothingness. Not that I believe in it.


message 7: by Little (new)

Little Miss Esoteric (littlemissesoteric) | 1116 comments It's taken me a long time to really believe in evil itself. Now I have accepted that it does exist in individuals, and both in the physical and in the spirit world/Otherworld/bardo etc. In individuals it is the choice to cause destruction either physically, psychologically, or emotionally, of another fellow human or sentient being, for the purpose of gaining power or control or to aid manipulation for those ends. I can see that this destruction can be undertaken by groups of people, united for a common goal and that harnessing of that negative energy creates a greater evil so to speak. But I still don't believe in the existence of a devil or figure of ultimate evil...


PJ Who Once Was Peejay | 336 comments Little wrote: "It's taken me a long time to really believe in evil itself. Now I have accepted that it does exist in individuals, and both in the physical and in the spirit world/Otherworld/bardo etc."

The evil men do live after them, as Shakespeare said. I think he was speaking more narrowly, of the ripples of evil that travel through a society/family from evil deeds, but I think it also applies in a spiritual sense. If you generate enough evil, enough negative energy, it can punch a hole in the...aethyr, for lack of a better term. This not only permeates this world, but the Otherworld, I think. Maybe even lets things through better left contained elsewhere.


message 9: by Little (new)

Little Miss Esoteric (littlemissesoteric) | 1116 comments Yes. Leaks through, and is called through.

Re individual malice or evil in the spirit world : https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/... (My comments in the Siren Call thread a while back):

"From Book II The Sidpa Bardo of the Tibetan Book of the Dead, some interesting notes from The Bardo Body: Its birth and its supernormal faculties:

The after death or desire-body is endowed with
--all sense-faculties
--the power of unimpeded motion
--the power of miraculous action
--limited karmic power of prescience

"On the Bardo plane--unlike the human world--every being possesses, in virtue of freedom from the impending gross physical body, a certain degree of the power (of prescience), as the text makes clear."

There is much mentioning of the importance of not getting carried away by these new temporary 'powers', as they divert you from liberation, or if unavoidable, a mindful rebirth.

"Owing to having arrived at the false concept of the Intermediate State is a desirable or fixable state of existence, all dwellers therein, -sprites, pretas, demons, and deceased human entities, -becoming thereby habituated to the Bardo, their normal evolution is retarded. ""

And as above so below, here in the physical world it is low conscience individuals--or those that choose to be--that manifest destruction. But most wear 'the Mask of Sanity' so we can't pick them out from the crowd.

All this makes sense to me but the Big Kahuna of evil? Something than orchestrates it all? That doesn't do it for me. Perhaps it's that collectively, the negative energy is extremely formidable, and if tapped into and possibly manipulated, it becomes the ultimate evil. I'm thinking of Hitler and the S.S and the horrors they perpetrated, as an example. There was no need for a devil in that scenario. The evil of men did it alone.


message 10: by Mark (new)

Mark Holborn | 6 comments Amy Victoria's girlfriend ❤ wrote: "I think this is a very good question. I don't believe in anytything superstitious around this adverb. Many people see the world only as black and white, which is nonsese.

I believe what my book sa..."

I agree with Amy, evil can be many things, a lot can be put down to ignorance or perspective. Like if I step on an ant hill, to the ants I am an evil being destroying their home and family, that is my ignorance of nature. 9/11 was a heinous act of terrorism, yet to those who committed the act probably believed they were on the side of right, again this would be perspective. Hurting people, rape, torture all of it is wrong, sure I lust after a pretty woman, but do I stalk her and forcibly take her? No? my moral compass says that is wrong, but to others the need to do this overrides everything else, is this labeled as evil or a sickness in the mind, or did society fail the perpetrator? Man is capable of evil acts, of evil thoughts, is it stimulated by the devil? No I again agree with Amy I don't think it exists, I don't really believe in heaven or hell but an afterlife yes. Now saying that about the devil not existing I however believe in demons and demonic entities. These in my mind would be a perspective & ignorance scenario, these creatures exist maybe in a different dimension and perhaps we are to them like the Ants,we are beneath them and we are but tools or a means to an end for them. We call them evil and malevolent but perhaps to them we are almost beneath notice. Which is why I will never have or use a Ouija board, it opens a door better left closed,we may think it is fun or we have set enough guards or protections against it, but reality speaking you are entering their turf, they are far wiser and more powerful than we can imagine, and no matter how smart we think we are, they are in a league all their own. sorry I tend to ramble a bit


message 11: by Aaron, Moderator (new)

Aaron Carson | 1216 comments I'm suspicious of the very word. I've observed that most religions, perhaps excepting paganism, have invented the notion of evil, and proceeded to obsess over it to the exclusion of the divine. It also seems that the very notion of it, begets more of the same. Certainly many atrocities have been committed in the name of wiping it out.

Like Mark said, the notion of evil has changed over time. Once upon a time in history, words like "pagan" and "witch" would have been considered very close, if not the same as the notion of "evil".

For me personally, I experience a similar repugnance to people who fear evil, when I encounter a rabid dog, or a bully, but I'm also aware that a rabid dog is in a state of torment, and has no specific intention of harm. A bully may be a similar matter, although I think it differs from case to case. The fact is, the fear and rage I experience when encountering a creature which is capable of random senseless harm is probably quite similar to peoples reaction to the notion of an evil they firmly believe in.

Philosophically I don't think evil is a useful notion. My fear and rage of dogs and bullies has not aided me in dealing with either.

More important I think is an ability to observe harmful phenomena, and guard oneself against the source.


PJ Who Once Was Peejay | 336 comments Little wrote: "All this makes sense to me but the Big Kahuna of evil? Something than orchestrates it all? That doesn't do it for me."

No, I don't think it's orchestrated by a God of Evil, either. The reptilian brain stem of human beings is fully capable of manufacturing anything needed to act out in a negative manner and in calling forth negativity.

Aaron wrote: "I'm suspicious of the very word....It also seems that the very notion of it, begets more of the same. "

I take your point, I think it's a valid one. But for me, it's just a word, a useful label to encapsulate something that lives and breathes in this world. I don't fear evil, I guard against it, but don't fear it. And maybe we need a better word, one less loaded with religious overtones—but words like negativity don't really have the same gravitas. They don't sufficiently describe the depth and depravity of the barbaric acts done in this world. But I absolutely respect your philosophy on this. It's very sound. Mine's just shaded somewhat differently.

Mark wrote: "Now saying that about the devil not existing I however believe in demons and demonic entities. These in my mind would be a perspective & ignorance scenario, these creatures exist maybe in a different dimension and perhaps we are to them like the Ants,"

Yes, I think they're here, but like you said, it's very hard to know what they are or where they come from or what they're about. I don't fear them in a Judeo-Christian sense, but I guard my boundaries and don't engage in behaviors that may call them forth. The world is a beautiful place with dark edges.


message 13: by Little (last edited Aug 14, 2014 03:57PM) (new)

Little Miss Esoteric (littlemissesoteric) | 1116 comments The anthill example is a good one Mark. Sometimes it is a matter of perspective. 'Do as you would be done by' is dubious advice if you are a masochist, and you really enjoy having pain inflicted on you. :D No way is it a good idea to go spreading that pain in the misguided hope that you will be sharing your happiness.

That moral compass is our conscience. Interestingly 1 in 25 people are low conscience individuals. They KNOW right from wrong but they don't feel pangs of guilt or remorse like we do. They can choose which action to take, on the desired outcome alone, without the baggage of moral ethics. (Not that I think ethics is baggage!) So sometimes I think the urge to act upon a desire is just too overwhelming/addictive/controlling for some, and for others it far more cold bloodied.

But some people are born that way, with large areas of the brain that deal with conscience, introspection, and empathy, seriously impaired. So although they may go out into the world and wreak violence, either emotionally or physically, are they truly evil if they are wired that way? I think it's the choice that defines it. It's what we do with our thoughts and impulses.

I do believe in the existence of demons, lower astral entities and demonic presences too Mark. And yes, I totally agree on Ouija boards. Have a look at this one that Hasbro has made in pink, just for kids...http://www.amazon.com/Hasbro-Ouija-Bo...

Evil is a tricky word for me too Aaron. I've always avoided it. It seemed so black and white, and linked in my mind to a Christian perspective. I do agree with Peejay though that sometimes no other word fits the bill. I think it's a dangerous word in itself as it encourages us not to care or show understanding for some. But then again I have recently discovered that I have been incredibly naive in my life to date, and my inability to perceive and guard against low conscience individuals has caught up with me in a big way. I think the idea of having the ability to observe harmful phenomena is important, and being able to see and recognise it as such, is part of that. For me my inability allowed me to be manipulated for far, far too long. A little less trust and loyalty would have served me well.

Peejay Who Once Was Minsma wrote: "The world is a beautiful place with dark edges."

Great description.


message 14: by Aaron, Moderator (new)

Aaron Carson | 1216 comments The advanced floral human brain: "Make love not war."
The mammalian brain: "To Hell with love, make war."
The Reptilian brain: "To hell with love, make war, and then lets go to the peace rally and get laid."


message 15: by Little (new)

Little Miss Esoteric (littlemissesoteric) | 1116 comments :D So good.


PJ Who Once Was Peejay | 336 comments Excellent analysis, Aaron. :-D


message 17: by Aaron, Moderator (new)

Aaron Carson | 1216 comments It's a quote from somewhere, I just can't remember where.


message 18: by Little (new)

Little Miss Esoteric (littlemissesoteric) | 1116 comments Yes autism is in there as it can apparently affect empathy too. Although I believe this is contested, and those with autism should not be lumped in with low conscience individuals such as your garden variety psychopath for instance.

"The Empathy Quotient, devised by Simon Baron-Cohen, is intended to measure how easily you pick up on other people's feelings and how strongly you are affected by other's feelings....There are no right or wrong answers, or trick questions. We do not advise you take this test too seriously--it is provided simply for your interest..."

The Empathy Trap: Understanding Antisocial Personalities


message 19: by Michaela (new)

Michaela Osiecki (rozemaiden87) Hmmm, evil is a very rigid word, isn't it? And it has all these preconceived connotations gleaned from different major world religions, but if I were to define evil in my world view, I would call it the epitome of all things sadistic - be of it human nature or something less tangible.

I've had encounters with negative hauntings and demons, it's really hard for me think of them as anything but evil, and I mean that in the vaguest sense possible.


message 20: by Little (new)

Little Miss Esoteric (littlemissesoteric) | 1116 comments Michaela wrote: "...and I mean that in the vaguest sense possible"

Vague is fine by me. The word is rigid, isn't it, and the principals defining it, but nothing else really hits it.

My brain still tries to skirt around the concept too. I think for those with conscience imagining it any other way is very hard.


message 21: by Little (new)

Little Miss Esoteric (littlemissesoteric) | 1116 comments Brian wrote: ""Sometimes evil is just another point of view."

From a discussion about chaos gods..."


Yes, as in the buddhist idea of the Malevolent Deities, that appear to help one gain liberation on the Sipa Bardo, and therefore pass on. Or the demons that strip our past deeds away before we pass on. Saturn/Satan as Cronos the devourer has a place in the grand scheme in the same way, but not as the Big Evil Dude, but as the challenge of entropy and the passing/changing of all things.

So what of evil then? Because it does exist doesn't it? Humans show it. Some just by going along in a trance like state and obeying. Others with specific goals or games in mind. And malice exists in the spirit world too. But animals don't have it do they? They work on instinct. They can go rogue, but that's usually due to illness. But then again mental illness in humans is illness too. So is evil an aberration or part of the great plan?

Reading The Sociopath Next Door: The Ruthless Versus the Rest of Us and it's got me thinking even more. Why are 4% (1 in 25) of the population born without empathy and conscience? And I'm not thinking genetics here, which would be an obvious answer.


message 22: by Little (new)

Little Miss Esoteric (littlemissesoteric) | 1116 comments "To admit that some people literally have no conscience is not technically the same as saying that some human beings are evil, but it is disturbingly close. And good people want very much not to believe in the personification of evil."

The Sociopath Next Door: The Ruthless Versus the Rest of Us by Martha Stout


message 23: by Amy (new)

Amy I doN't think it matters much if someone believes in the personification of evil. As long as they do something. To me if anyone sees something wrong being done to someone else and decides not to act isn't much better than the violator. Anyone who chooses ignorance isn't better. There is no excuse for that


message 24: by Aaron, Moderator (new)

Aaron Carson | 1216 comments But how do you define it?


message 25: by Amy (new)

Amy Well, there are many options and possibilities. Someone may be handicapped. But at least call for help. Not just avert eyes


message 26: by Aaron, Moderator (new)

Aaron Carson | 1216 comments Sorry, no I meant evil. For me rabid dogs, serial killers, volcanoes, these things are compelled to cause harm by their very nature, and thus are the closest thing I can imagine to evil. Someone else might disagree.

For instance in the courts a different punishment is allotted for someone who commits a crime in cold blood, as opposed to someone who does it in a fit of passion, and still another punishment is designated for someone who has a condition which compels them to commit harm.

It seems the philosophy of our judicial system(s) is roughly that someone who commits a crime in cold blood is curable, that's why they're punished. The hope is that they we see the error of their ways and be rehabilitated.

The same is not the case for someone who has a condition like psychopathy. Although we send them to mental facilities, the intent is usually that they stay there indefinitely until they die.

For me I have to say that I think the notions of evil, and even good, are mostly intellectual. Nature itself includes both destruction and creation, cruelty and compassion. As beings with advanced mental faculties, we are able to use these faculties to achieve either. The mystery is what compels a person to choose one over the other.


message 27: by Amy (new)

Amy I see, sorry. Well, I don't count catastrophes. No one can control those. And animals aren't usually evil on their own. Say a snake doesn't bites because it wants necessarily harm, but because it may feel threaten, or is on the hunt, but that's instinct.

I count evil only with humans because we have the gift of creative thinking. Our actions aren't usually controlled by our basic instincts.


message 28: by Aaron, Moderator (new)

Aaron Carson | 1216 comments Catastrophes can't be controlled but they can be guarded against, without blame.


message 29: by Amy (new)

Amy Yes, some can be. Bu as I said, I don't count natural catastrophes.


message 30: by Aaron, Moderator (new)

Aaron Carson | 1216 comments I just think it's important to understand how each of us defines evil. Each person, (certainly each culture), may have their own definition.

For me personally it's mainly a question of guarding against, as the primary point of concern. I live in a world where there are many destructive forces, some are by design and some are by accident, but I'm not sure which of these would fall into the category of evil as understood in a religious sense.

Certainly I think the contemporary opinion is that evil is peoples intent to get ahead at the expense of others and I would tend to agree that this is probably the worst sort of behaviour. But this is quite removed from the original idea of something, (like the devil) which is evil by nature. But is this not like a volcano? Presumably something which is evil by nature has no choice in the matter?


message 31: by Amy (new)

Amy We all live in such a world. Just some places may be worse than others.
I am from Central Europe, and we may be at the brink of war between Russia and Ukraine. And then there is the every day evil.

There are things many refer to as evil. Say like drugs. Someone takes drugs, drives and kills some people. But these substances that may cause hallucinations, paranoia and anxiety were either just usual plants, some sort of mineral, or whatever. It's just people misusing everything.
Remember all those big inventions. Gunpowder. It was designed for fireworks, and a bit later people started using it for guns. Same with the blade, arrow. The wheel. An we make chariots for war. If we go a bot further to the nuclear bomb. It's a source of energy. But the first idea comes for a bomb, which has been used even if it was not necessary. It's always humans misusing something against each other, and that is bad.

Sure, if a volcano explodes it drives many people away from their homes. Or hurricanes. They might destroy, injure and kill. But, I don't know, I don't see the forces of nature as evil. But that's just me.


message 32: by Little (new)

Little Miss Esoteric (littlemissesoteric) | 1116 comments Amy Victoria's girlfriend ❤ wrote: "To me if anyone sees something wrong being done to someone else and decides not to act isn't much better than the violator. Anyone who chooses ignorance isn't better. There is no excuse for that
."


"Conscience is the window of our spirit, evil is the curtain." Doug Horton.

I so agree with this. Apathy or indifference is the greater evil to me, as it is being aware of the act and it's consequences, but remaining unwilling or uninterested in doing anything about it.

No I don't see forces of nature as evil either. But the idea of Satan, or Saturn, Cronus etc as the destroyer, disrupter and such, is most closely aligned with the idea of the devil, and in this way it is a force of nature, isn't it? But to me, in this physical realm, evil is the result of humans and human activity.

Aaron wrote: "For me I have to say that I think the notions of evil, and even good, are mostly intellectual. Nature itself includes both destruction and creation, cruelty and compassion. As beings with advanced mental faculties, we are able to use these faculties to achieve either. The mystery is what compels a person to choose one over the other. "

Evil actions are committed by different types and for different reasons. It can be a result of temporary loss of empathy--brought on by psychosis, illness, brain damage or overwhelming emotions that block out all else. Cold blooded acts of evil are something else.

Psychopaths--the cold ones-- do know right from wrong, they just don't care. They are without conscience and remorse.

As you said Aaron psychopaths are committed for life because there is NO cure, and therapy itself is useless with these people. Psychopaths or Sociopaths (very little difference and the differences are debated) who have been caught make up the bulk of the most violent criminal offenders. But most psychopaths are not physically violent and choose instead to wreak destruction through manipulation and games within our communities. They hardly ever get caught, and those that find out, oppose them, or call them out, are at risk of vengeance in all forms.

As Martha Stout says sociopathy/psychopathy it is a result of both nature and nurture. They are born with a predisposition, with brain areas affected, but the environment in which they grow up also contributes to whether they become fully fledged empathy devoid cold blooded bastards. (Sorry, got carried away there...)

It is thought (debated) that Hitler was a malignant narcissist/psychopath (again the distinction between the two are blurred, all psychopaths are narcissists and many narcissists are psychopaths) along with other antisocial/borderline personality disorders. Personally I think pretty much all of the Black Shirts (S.S) and all of the Brown Shirts were psychopaths. And under their control psychopathic behaviour became the norm. War is fertile ground for psychopaths and apathy aids them greatly.

I've even read discussions about Cain and Abel with the idea that psychopaths are the progeny of Cain, and as such are an almost separate race of humans...

And if narcissism as a form of psychopathy is increasing, and it certainly is, what does that say for our future?

I have so many questions and very few answers. Good to contemplate though.


message 33: by Aaron, Moderator (new)

Aaron Carson | 1216 comments Little wrote: "fully fledged empathy devoid cold blooded bastards"

:D :D :D Love you Gina.


PJ Who Once Was Peejay | 336 comments I'm currently reading The Witch's Shield: Protection Magick and Psychic Self-Defense by Christopher Penczak. I wanted to quote a couple passages that might be interesting in the context of this discussion:

[M]ost witches, myself included, are not Pollyannas about the existence of harmful spirits and people. Just because we don't believe in an ultimate source of evil, like the Christian Devil, does not mean that people's strong intentions and beliefs have not created toughtforms and constructs of evil, or that less-than-loving spirits don't answer to the various names of the devil to receive attention and energy from humans.


Psychic Amy Allan says something similar, that thoughtforms can turn into real harmful entities, given energy by the harmful emotions of people in an environment: anger, envy, fear, etc. She also says that there are entities more powerful than poltergeists and demons. You might call them devils, but they aren't The Devil. She also does not believe in an ultimate source of evil. She says these devils are very rare and very powerful, she doesn't know what creates them, but they exist in places all around the world, often places with a lot of blood, conflict, hate, bad histories, etc. You can protect yourself from them, but you can't banish them.

I find myself wondering if they aren't another factor, beyond the purely human kind of evil, that push those already on the brink of human evil over the edge? A sort of metaphysical source of psychopathy?

Don't get me wrong, like many have stated here, I think human beings and their various pathologies are fully capable of cooking up evil themselves without metaphysical aid, but I think it's an interest concept that this also might be in the mix.

More from Penczak:

"Harmful energy" is a phrase I use where other people say "negative energy." I don't use the term negative energy and strongly suggest that other people don't use it in ritual with me. Denoting "negative" with "bad" and "positive" with "good" is another polarizing New Age concept. Although the intention behind such words is clear, the literal meaning is not, since negative/positive refer to an electrical charge, and things like negative ions can be healthy for you. Anything that brings you out of balance is "bad," but it is not necessarily negative. If it is something that causes harm, disruption, or imbalance, then call if harmful, unbalanced, or discordant energy.


It's very difficult to know how to name things, and as any witch knows, the names of things can sometimes hold great power. "Evil" carries so much baggage from religion, but as I've said before, most other words in the English language that I can think of aren't adequate to describe some forms of intentional harm. I suppose psychopath and sociopath come closest.


PJ Who Once Was Peejay | 336 comments Little wrote: "But most psychopaths are not physically violent and choose instead to wreak destruction through manipulation and games within our communities. They hardly ever get caught, and those that find out, oppose them, or call them out, are at risk of vengeance in all forms. "

And then there's this: CEO's are four times more likely than any other profession to meet the criteria of sociopath.

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/drishtik...

http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffberco...

Just type "CEO sociopath study" into Google and there are a multiplicity of sources. Those two are just the first couple.

Now, we're talking about 4% of the CEO population, but that's 1 in 25, so that's definitely thought provoking. And not much of a surprise to me.

Personally, I nominate Donald Trump as Sociopath-in-Chief.


message 36: by Aaron, Moderator (new)

Aaron Carson | 1216 comments I love Rosie's impersonation. I can't stop watching it.


PJ Who Once Was Peejay | 336 comments Yes! She nails him good. And that hairstyle alone would peg him as a sociopath. He's the only one in the world who doesn't think it's a ridiculous comb-over.


message 38: by Little (new)

Little Miss Esoteric (littlemissesoteric) | 1116 comments Aaron wrote: "Little wrote: "fully fledged empathy devoid cold blooded bastards"

:D :D :D Love you Gina."


Back at you Aaron. :D:D:D


message 39: by Little (last edited Aug 27, 2014 06:43PM) (new)

Little Miss Esoteric (littlemissesoteric) | 1116 comments Peejay Who Once Was Minsma wrote: "Little wrote: "But most psychopaths are not physically violent and choose instead to wreak destruction through manipulation and games within our communities. They hardly ever get caught, and those ..."

Adding the Penzance book. Thanks! Re the places that attract the ancient entities, places of conflict and bloodshed, that's also in keeping with LAEs and Shedim etc.

Re psychopaths:
Top Ten Jobs of a Psychopath:

1. CEO
2. Lawyer
3. Media (Television/Radio)
4. Salesperson
5. Surgeon
6. Journalist
7. Police officer
8. Clergy person
9. Chef
10. Civil servant

http://www.forbes.com/sites/kellyclay...

Overall these are jobs that hold power, control and prestige. They have an excitement factor (psychopaths are chronically bored) and give an aura of helpfulness and respectability. Camouflage. And of course chefs get to play with knives. Always a bonus.

Snakes in Suits: When Psychopaths Go to Work covers this I believe (on my to read list).

Now if so many of our global companies are run by psychopaths what does that say for the state of the world? Very scary. When we say they are cold blooded that's exactly what they are. And I can tell you looking into the eyes of a psychopath at a time of intense distress and seeing nothing--absolutely no emotion other than a look of faint smugness, is extremely unnerving! They appear cool, calm and collected, not because they have it together, but because they feel nothing.

I find myself playing 'spot the psychopath' now when I'm out and about. I'm getting pretty good at it. Unfortunately they are far better at 'spot the empath or next sucker who I'm going to sink my teeth into'.

“He will choose you, disarm you with his words, and control you with his presence. He will delight you with his wit and his plans. He will show you a good time but you will always get the bill. He will smile and deceive you, and he will scare you with his eyes. And when he is through with you, and he will be through with you, he will desert you and take with him your innocence and your pride. You will be left much sadder but not a lot wiser, and for a long time you will wonder what happened and what you did wrong. And if another of his kind comes knocking on your door, will you open it?"

Robert D. Hare


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