The Filipino Group discussion

note: This topic has been closed to new comments.
90 views
F2F Book Discussions > F2F78: June 2018 | Short Stories

Comments Showing 1-32 of 32 (32 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Monique (last edited May 31, 2018 08:43PM) (new)

Monique (attymonique) | 2127 comments Hello everyone! I'm Monique, your moderator for June, and I will be reading and talking about short stories (and short story collections) with you this month. Please join the online discussion via this thread, and I hope you could also attend the face-to-face discussion on the final weekend of the month.

As with the previous months, all you have to do is pick one, or two, or more short story collections that you will read for the month. Then, check back here for questions that I will be posting as we go along our readings. I hope everyone participates! :)

Let's start off with the questions for the first week.

Week 1
1. Which short story collections/compendiums are you reading for the month? Why did you choose it/them?
2. What do you think of short stories as a form of literature?
3. Do you have a favorite short story? What is it and in what collection is it included? Why is it your favorite?

Because I love short stories, I'm looking forward to reading your answers! :)


message 2: by Monique (new)

Monique (attymonique) | 2127 comments Of course, I get to go first :)

Week 1
1. Which short story collections/compendiums are you reading for the month? Why did you choose it/them?
- I will be reading Fortune Smiles by Adam Johnson "Fortune Smiles" by Adam Johnson and Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage Stories by Alice Munro "Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage: Stories" by Alice Munro. I picked Adam Johnson because I loved his novel, "The Orphan Master's Son," but I've yet to read his short stories. Meanwhile, I picked Alice Munro's collection because it's long overdue. :)

2. What do you think of short stories as a form of literature?
- They are short but pack a punch. They allow you to read something substantial for short periods, and you get that same feeling of satisfaction that you get after reading a full-length novel, except that you read something that's merely a thousand (or even fewer) words. I love short stories. (I'm a contributor at The Short Story Station, guys! Please visit it [although it's been inactive for a while, hehe.])

3. Do you have a favorite short story? What is it and in what collection is it included? Why is it your favorite?
- My favorite short story of all time is Neil Gaiman's "Snow, Glass, Apples." It's a retelling and it's included in Gaiman's "Smoke and Mirrors" compendium. I love it because of how it was told, how I felt after I read it (in awe), and how creatively it was conceived by the author.


message 3: by Ravenchild (new)

Ravenchild Gardens | 14 comments Mainly because the editor and i can't seem to finish War and Peace ,I'm reading his book Desert Island Decameron published in 1945. Shorts are essential literature because thw power of one sitting makes me relate quicker to the effects of the story. I can't pick a single favorite from my treasured shorts collection Asimovs Mysteries, the stories here have scifi, mysteries, and wit galore:)


message 4: by Abdul (last edited Jun 04, 2018 04:30PM) (new)

Abdul (juramentado) | 58 comments Week 1

1. Which short story collections/compendiums are you reading for the month? Why did you choose it/them?
I'm reading Penelope Lively's Beyond The Blue Mountains and Haggag Hassan Oddoul's Nights of Musk: Stories from Old Nubia, and maybe finish O. Henry Prize Stories 2008. I picked them because I saw them in BookSale and thought, "Why not?" Plus, I have a copy of Lively's Moon Tiger and I want to know beforehand if I like her before I read the novel.

2. What do you think of short stories as a form of literature?
They're great! I have neither the time nor strength of focus to read longer texts, so short stories are a blessing. Plus, you have to hand it to the authors when they get you to feel for the characters in a short amount of time or when they deliver a satisfying conclusion to a story that's basically only thirty minutes of your life.

3. Do you have a favorite short story? What is it and in what collection is it included? Why is it your favorite?
I don't have one. In exchange, I'll list some that I really liked.

May Day Eve by Nick Joaquin
from May Day Eve and Other Stories

The Flicker by Ian Rosales Casocot
from Heartbreak and Magic

The Specialist's Hat by Kelly Link
from Stranger Things Happen

The Fountain House by Ludmilla Petrushevskaya
from There Once Lived a Woman Who Tried to Kill Her Neighbor's Baby: Scary Fairy Tales

Touch by Alexi Zentner
from O. Henry Prize Stories 2008

Victory Lap by George Saunders
from Tenth of December

An Army Newspaper by Hassan Blasim
from The Corpse Exhibition and Other Stories of Iraq

Dinner for Ten by Aatish Taseer
from Noon

Crazy Glue by Etgar Keret
Hat Trick by Etgar Keret
from The Girl on the Fridge

Story of Your Life by Ted Chiang
from Stories of Your Life and Others


message 5: by Maria Ella (new)

Maria Ella (mariaellabetos) | 1351 comments Week 1

1. Which short story collections/compendiums are you reading for the month? Why did you choose it/them?

- I am currently reading this book Noisy outlaws, unfriendly blobs, and some other things that aren't as scary, maybe, depending on how you feel about lost lands, stray cellphones, creatures from the sky, parents who disappear in Peru, a man named Lars Farf, and one other story ...  by Eli Horowitz

Curious story I randomly found this on a Book Sale in Legazpi, Albay!!! It was placed together with other children books. Little did I know that these whimsical stories are written by some great authors (Neil Gaiman, George Saunders, Lemony Snicketts, etc)

2. What do you think of short stories as a form of literature?

- Echoing Monique, they are short but pack a punch. At first, reading these stories in one go is tiring, because you tend to shift from one story to another, a different feel compared to the immersive flow of the novels (especially if a novel is action-filled)

3. Do you have a favorite short story? What is it and in what collection is it included? Why is it your favorite?
- Not exactly favorite, but actually it has the greatest recall --- it was Impeng Negro by Rogelio Sicat. I first read it in 6th grade, and I still remember the scenes up to this day. It may be a poverty porn of sorts (or social realism in the 70s), but it simply hits you with its easily-understood Filipino.

(view spoiler)


message 6: by Don (new)

Don (donx) | 19 comments Week 1

1. Which short story collections/compendiums are you reading for the month? Why did you choose it/them?
I will be reading Alice Munro's Best: A Selection of Stories.
She's a master of the form so I think this is a good choice.


2. What do you think of short stories as a form of literature?

I love short stories (and novellas) because you can finish reading them in one sitting. They are also less of a roller coaster ride than that of novels.


3. Do you have a favorite short story? What is it and in what collection is it included? Why is it your favorite?

It's hard to pick just one so here are my top three (from the few that I've read).

Train Dreams, by Denis Johnson (from The O. Henry Prize Stories 2003)

The Road to Rankin's Point, by Alistair MacLeod (from The Lost Salt Gift of Blood: Stories)

Cecil Grounded, by Richard Plant (from Best Stories from New Writers, edited by Linda S Sanders, 1989)


message 7: by Meliza (new)

Meliza (mecawish) | 720 comments 1. I'm going to read Nocturnes: Five Stories of Music and Nightfall by Kazuo Ishiguro because it's by Kazuo Ishiguro, it's about music and I love the paperback cover. (I was torn between buying this and one of Murakami's but the cover made the difference. LOL. Will buy the Murakami stories collection next time, maybe.)

2. Before joining TFG, I seldom read short stories but now I really appreciate this form. Short stories tend to make me pay more attention while reading. It's as if because it's short, I have to savor every sentence, every word, each moment. And I admire authors who write good short stories, how they could make me think and make me feel something for fewer words and less time than reading a novel.

3. I don't have a favorite story but I really love the following collections (in no particular order):
- CivilWarLand in Bad Decline by George Saunders
- Drown by Junot Diaz
- Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri


message 8: by Reian'sReads (new)

Reian'sReads (reee_yan) | 4 comments 1. Which short story collections/compendiums are you reading for the month? Why did you choose it/them?

I will be reading Six Months, Three Days, Five Others
I chose this because synopsis of the different stories sees very intriguing to me. Plus its on the library app i use so i can read it for free. hehe. while supporting my library. Plus its only 190 ish pages. :)

2. What do you think of short stories as a form of literature?

I think its a very helpful way for people who just struggle going immensely and deeply into worlds of standard novels. Its also a great way for introducing people to different authors with distinct writing styles within just one book.

3. Do you have a favorite short story? What is it and in what collection is it included? Why is it your favorite?

This would be the first (i believe) short story that i will read. But maybe i have read some short stories. If so I don't remember. heh.


message 9: by Angus (last edited Jun 05, 2018 09:10PM) (new)

Angus (angusmiranda) | 4337 comments Week 1:

1. I'll be reading Edith Pearlman's Binocular Vision because it's an NBCC winner for fiction. It's kinda thick though, so if I chicken out, I'll go with Lucia Berlin's A Manual for Cleaning Women (still in its shrink wrap lol).

2. Being a contributor of the defunct inactive blog Short Story Station should speak for itself, no? While novels excel at capturing big themes, short stories effectively tackle the minutiae of daily life (an arbitrary statement as this could go the either way). But anyway. Short stories are more immediate, less demanding of time, and just as potent as other forms of literature.

3. My answer will change every time so for now, it would have to be A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner. I read it in a college text book, and I distinctly remember that nagging want to write a story with a similar effect on the reader. It's one of those stories that made me attempt to write (attempt is the keyword).


message 10: by Bennard (new)

Bennard | 730 comments Week 1:

1. I'll be reading William Trevor's Last Stories. It's the final collection of the Irish master before he died two years ago. I've always encountered Trevor's work in magazines and anthologies but I've always wanted to read a full collection of his work. It feels odd that I am going to start at the end with Trevor but here I am.

2. I have immense respect for the short story and, whenever I think of some of the most potent pieces of literature that I have read in the entirety of my life, my mind almost always go to a short story rather than other forms of literature. Also, I don't think anyone can name a better living writer right now than Alice Munro, a writer who has exclusively dealt in short fiction.

3. Like Angus, my answer changes every time. For now, and this story has to be at the very top of the heap, my answer would be Alice Munro's Axis. The way that Munro plays with time and the way that she writes about human emotion is astounding. There are certain truths about this world that very few have access to and Munro is one of those people.


message 11: by Tin (new)

Tin (rabbitin) | 560 comments Week 1
1. Which short story collections/compendiums are you reading for the month? Why did you choose it/them?

I choose Neil Gaiman's Fragile Things: Short Fictions and Wonders because Neil Gaiman's writing is kind of a comfort food for me, weirdly enough. And if I have time, squeeze in a Lorie Moore.

2. What do you think of short stories as a form of literature?
Short Stories as a form of literature is often under appreciated next to the long form, BUT I think it has gained more popularity thanks to the digital age. There are lots of short stories you can read online, from big and small publications and websites etc. Also, literary awards have been recognizing them too, take for example Tenth of December which won the Folio Prize. So yeah, I think things are looking up for the short story form!

3. Do you have a favorite short story? What is it and in what collection is it included? Why is it your favorite?

I have to echo Angus and Benny and say that mine changes depending on the time of day. But most if not all of George Saunders' I love. On the top of my head, there's Semplica Girl Diaries (Tenth of December), The 300-pound CEO (Civilwarland in Bad Decline). And the others I still remember being particularly jarred by are Car Crash while Hitchhiking by Denis Johnson, Jhumpa Lahiri's Sexy (Interpreter of Maladies) and Miranda July's Roy Spivey.


message 12: by Monique (new)

Monique (attymonique) | 2127 comments RAVENCHILD: It seems it's hard for a lot of people to pick just one favorite story!

WILLIAM: I take it Neil Gaiman is also a favorite author? Have you read "The Sleeper and The Spindle"?

ABDUL: I hope you get to finish Penelope Lively's collection, because I also have a copy of "Moon Tiger" and would like feedback on her writing style, as well. And I hope to see you again in the F2Fs!

ELLA: Hmm, I'm curious about that book. See you at the F2F! Matagal ka na (ring) absent!

DON: I also have a copy of that Alice Munro. Have you read her before?

MELIZA: Ah, beloved Ishi. "Nocturnes" also exemplifies his beautiful writing. Would love to hear your thoughts on it soon.

REIAN'SREADS: We'd love to hear how you will like (or dislike?) this first short story!

ANGUS: Never say defunct! Hahaha. We shall return. :D

BENNY: "Short story" is now synonymous with "Alice Munro," right? :)

TIN: "Fragile Things" is my favorite Neil Gaiman collection, ever. And you know what, my copy was given by another Tin! Hihi. I hope you'll like this collection, too. (I know you will, hehe.)


message 13: by Eleanor (new)

Eleanor Tolentino | 7 comments Hello there!

I will be reading Men Without Women by Haruki Murakami

Since I really liked his South of border west of sun, I thought I should give it a try. I have no idea which collection to read anyway and the title is too intriguing to resist.

I can’t recall the last time I read a short story so I can’t name any that I like in particular.

I’m glad though that this is our topic for this month. This reminded me to read more short stories.


message 14: by Don (last edited Jun 07, 2018 07:44AM) (new)

Don (donx) | 19 comments Monique wrote: "DON: I also have a copy of that Alice Munro. Have you read her before?


Nope, I don't remember reading her before, but she's always on the top of my to-read list. I just started reading the first story from Alice Munro's Best, and I was blown away instantly. :)


message 15: by Monique (last edited Jun 07, 2018 07:19PM) (new)

Monique (attymonique) | 2127 comments Thank you for all your answers, guys! On to the next set of questions.

Week 2

1. Practically all of you who answered said that you more or less appreciate the short story as a literature form. This simply means that you've read short stories before, and I'm sure we've all read them when we were in school. Is there a particular short story that you've read in school that has stuck with you up to now?

2. Apart from the writing composition projects that we were all subjected to in school, have you ever tried writing a short story? Why or why not? If yes, what was the story about?

3. Ernest Hemingway wrote "For sale: baby shoes, never worn", when challenged to write a short story in just 6 words. Have you come across a similar short story - written in 10 or fewer words - that leaves an impact on the reader? Please share.


message 16: by Eleanor (new)

Eleanor Tolentino | 7 comments 1. Its literally a blur to me now— my early school days (showing my age)
I can’t recall a specific title but I would enjoy getting these small books from our library during a reading class held there. Looking back, how I wish I read more of them when I had more time.

2. I did try to write once, the setting was in Tagaytay, early days of course since this was back in HS. All I can remember that it is set in a cafe while raining. The cafe of course, Bag of Beans, back in the day they were still considered a gem, an escape. My heroine had an amnesia. That’s all I remember because I didn’t get to finishi it.

3. No this is foreign to me.


I’m loving Murakami’s Short Story Collection. Finished my first one and on to the next story.

Happy reading everyone!


message 17: by Louize (last edited Jun 08, 2018 11:57PM) (new)

Louize (thepagewalker) | 1830 comments Week 1
1. Which short story collections/compendiums are you reading for the month? Why did you choose it/them?

>I'm listening to Neil Gaiman's Trigger Warning: Short Fictions and Disturbances. Most of the stories here I've read before, but there seems to be magic listening to Gaiman's voice.

2. What do you think of short stories as a form of literature?

>Short stories, for me, are like optical instruments of particular event/s or occurrence/s in a daily life. It's not necessarily grand or epic, but can turn tides or mark a human soul.

"I grew up loving and respecting short stories. They seemed to me to be the purest and most perfect things people could make: not a word wasted, in the best of them." -Neil Gaiman

3. Do you have a favorite short story? What is it and in what collection is it included? Why is it your favorite?

>I have plenty. Let us just settle with these in the meantime. And almost anything Neil Gaiman wrote.


message 18: by Abdul (last edited Jun 10, 2018 10:18AM) (new)

Abdul (juramentado) | 58 comments Week 2

1. Practically all of you who answered said that you more or less appreciate the short story as a literature form. This simply means that you've read short stories before, and I'm sure we've all read them when we were in school. Is there a particular short story that you've read in school that has stuck with you up to now?

Doreen's Story by Rosario Cruz Lucero.

My group was assigned to report on Doreen's Story. At first I was bored reading it and found its inclusion of a mermaid very silly, much more the love triangle including said mermaid. Then it came to this one scene where a misguided man, in celebration of his nth wedding anniversary, plays a record on the village center's PA system at midnight to loudly declare his enduring love for his wife, waking up the entire barangay in the process. That record was the opera single Nessun Dorma. I Googled it, read its translated lyrics, and burst into an uncontrollable fit of laughter. That was when I realized I had missed a lot of cues that this story was supposed to be partly funny, if not amusing. I paid more attention in class afterwards.

2. Apart from the writing composition projects that we were all subjected to in school, have you ever tried writing a short story? Why or why not? If yes, what was the story about?

Yes. Because why not write?

The most recent one is about two students in a Catholic all-boys school, a Muslim boy and an openly gay atheist, becoming friends in secret.

3. Ernest Hemingway wrote "For sale: baby shoes, never worn", when challenged to write a short story in just 6 words. Have you come across a similar short story - written in 10 or fewer words - that leaves an impact on the reader? Please share.

Nothing with as much punch as that Hemingway line.

A few years ago, a lot of tumblr users tried to write six-word stories. My favorite is this:

"I destroy myself so you can't." (Confusing Sin and Morality)

As you can see, they were more like vaguebook hugot type, like so:

"But, do you yearn for me?" (the worlds in words)

Anyway, here's a tumblr about them: Six Word Stories.


message 19: by Tin (last edited Jun 09, 2018 11:02PM) (new)

Tin (rabbitin) | 560 comments Week 2

1. Some of the high school short stories we read that I still remember to this day are: The Necklace by Guy de Maupassant (the famed French short story writer) because once I read that final line, I was a goner. It is a stab in the heart to an already tragic tale. Also The Cask of Amontillado by Edgar Allan Poe for the reason that it is a sick-ass revenge tale worthy of GoT.

2. Aw no. I don't think I ever did. My mom did tho, about a kid and a fat bird, and I would ask her to tell it to me, like every chance I got. She eventually got tired of having to tell it over and over, so she recorded her voice on a cassette. I may have told this story at some point here.

3. Nope! Not yet. A short story in less than 10 words is new to me. Will go clickety on Abdul's links.

Monique: Snow, Glass, Apples is awesome! It is my best story in Smoke and Mirrors too. I also enjoyed the one with the angels, and Goldfish Pool. :D Fragile Things is going great so far.

Mommy L: Neil Gaiman! Yaaaaas.


message 20: by Angus (new)

Angus (angusmiranda) | 4337 comments Week 2

1. Ang Kuwento ni Mabuti by Genoveva Edroza Matute. I don't remember the details but I remember the grief in the story. I've just skimmed an online version and realize now that I remember it differently.

2. Yes. A lot. They came back to me in a deluge so I listed them down. If I rewrite them all, I could come up with a collection haha.

(view spoiler)

3. Yes, but I'm not a fan of flash fiction. I've read some pieces. They're good but they don't stay with me. I think it's lazy poetry hehe. (Also, it's not entirely substantiated that Hemingway wrote this. It was contested a number of times but Hemingway being a master of brevity, well, I guess that's why.)


message 21: by Ravenchild (new)

Ravenchild Gardens | 14 comments Week 2

1. Practically all of you who answered said that you more or less appreciate the short story as a literature form. This simply means that you've read short stories before, and I'm sure we've all read them when we were in school. Is there a particular short story that you've read in school that has stuck with you up to now?

Rogelio Sikat stories from my H.S. books, looking now for his complete collected stories (Tata Selo rocks;)

2. Apart from the writing composition projects that we were all subjected to in school, have you ever tried writing a short story? Why or why not? If yes, what was the story about?

Few because of my creative writing friends. They are the 'make the author cry with criticism' kind so i wrote an anti-workshop story once to counter all their objections--they didn't like it but couldn't give specific details why. Success!

3. Ernest Hemingway wrote "For sale: baby shoes, never worn", when challenged to write a short story in just 6 words. Have you come across a similar short story - written in 10 or fewer words - that leaves an impact on the reader? Please share.

"Reluctantly, she left him."


message 22: by Louize (new)

Louize (thepagewalker) | 1830 comments Week 2

1. Practically all of you who answered said that you more or less appreciate the short story as a literature form. This simply means that you've read short stories before, and I'm sure we've all read them when we were in school. Is there a particular short story that you've read in school that has stuck with you up to now?

>None, sadly. The only fact I sill remember is Deogracias Rosario; and we sort of discussed a few of his stories -one, was very tragic.

2. Apart from the writing composition projects that we were all subjected to in school, have you ever tried writing a short story? Why or why not? If yes, what was the story about?

>Yes. It's about a girl staying for a weekend in the province.

3. Ernest Hemingway wrote "For sale: baby shoes, never worn", when challenged to write a short story in just 6 words. Have you come across a similar short story - written in 10 or fewer words - that leaves an impact on the reader? Please share.

>Yes, but can't remember any of them. I guess, I'm not a fan.


message 23: by Don (last edited Jun 13, 2018 05:20PM) (new)

Don (donx) | 19 comments Week 2:

1. Sandaang Damit by Fanny Garcia.

2. I finished writing two short stories back in college but they were never published and I already lost my copies of them. One of the stories is about a boy who witnessed the drowning of a bad guy.

3. I can't remember any. But I like that one written by Hemingway.


message 24: by Monique (new)

Monique (attymonique) | 2127 comments How was the long weekend, guys? Hope you managed to squeeze in some reading! Which leads me to...

Week 3

Excuse me while I rack my brain for more substantial questions but in the meantime, let's have reading updates!

How's your reading coming along? Any particular story that has stood out in the collection you've picked so far? Please share a favorite quote from it. :)


message 25: by Ravenchild (new)

Ravenchild Gardens | 14 comments A title from the shorts book Desert Island Decameron struck a specific nerve in me: "The Tooth, The Whole Tooth, and Nothing but The Tooth":)


message 26: by Monique (new)

Monique (attymonique) | 2127 comments Ravenchild wrote: "A title from the shorts book Desert Island Decameron struck a specific nerve in me: "The Tooth, The Whole Tooth, and Nothing but The Tooth":)"

I gather the story is all about a tooth? :)


message 27: by Monique (new)

Monique (attymonique) | 2127 comments Answering my own question: I finished reading Adam Johnson's "Fortune Smiles" a couple of weeks ago and in "Dark Meadow," there's this quote that says:

“He says you can defuse a bomb in the real world, but the bomb in your head, that’s forever.”

Truth?


message 28: by Louize (new)

Louize (thepagewalker) | 1830 comments It's always a pleasure to read/ listen to Neil Gaiman. I especially liked his narration of Black Dog.


message 29: by Monique (last edited Jun 24, 2018 06:29PM) (new)

Monique (attymonique) | 2127 comments So, is everyone busy devouring their short stories? :D

For the fourth and final week before the F2F (and as if you haven't had enough short stories to read already), I won't be asking any more questions. Instead, I'll leave you with the controversial short story from 2017, Cat Person by Kristen Roupenian. The story sparked a LOT of controversy in social media - it tackled gender, sex, privilege, and there's some body-shaming in there, too. If you do get to read it, please leave your thoughts/comments on this thread. :)

See you all on Saturday! :)


message 30: by Monique (new)

Monique (attymonique) | 2127 comments For those who will attend the F2F on Saturday:

If possible, please bring the copy of the short story collection that you chose to read. ALSO, please bring OTHER short story collections that you would recommend/book push/shove to everyone. Thank you.


message 31: by Abdul (new)

Abdul (juramentado) | 58 comments Monique wrote: "How's your reading coming along?"

*sweats profusely*


message 32: by Monique (new)

Monique (attymonique) | 2127 comments *Thank you to those who participated online and attended the F2F discussion last Saturday. Next, prepare your classics for the July discussion. :)


back to top
This topic has been frozen by the moderator. No new comments can be posted.