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Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI
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Archive - Group Reads > Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann (no spoilers) - June 2018

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message 1: by Gem , Moderator & Admin (last edited May 30, 2018 11:38AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Gem  | 1335 comments Mod
Hello fellow Crime, Mystery, and Thriller readers! This discussion is about Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann and your hostess is Erica.
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Information about Spoilers

Please note no spoilers should be revealed in this discussion.
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Killers of the Flower Moon The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann Killers of the Flower Moon The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann

Summary

In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian Nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, the Osage rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe.

Then, one by one, they began to be killed off. One Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, watched as her family was murdered. Her older sister was shot. Her mother was then slowly poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more Osage began to die under mysterious circumstances.

In this last remnant of the Wild West—where oilmen like J. P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes such as Al Spencer, “the Phantom Terror,” roamed – virtually anyone who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll surpassed more than twenty-four Osage, the newly created F.B.I. took up the case, in what became one of the organization’s first major homicide investigations. But the bureau was then notoriously corrupt and initially bungled the case. Eventually the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to try to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only Native American agents in the bureau. They infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest modern techniques of detection. Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most sinister conspiracies in American history.


message 2: by M.A.R. (new)

M.A.R. Unger | 127 comments Being a student of Native American history since 1970, I found this book to be written with more journalistic integrity than expected. If written back then, there would be a whole different telling. I'm glad there were photos. I wanted to see the people affected. Greed, a clash of cultures ... it's all here. Yes, I a summary is a good starting point, but let's see discussions. Look at what happened when this Osage community was thrust into modernity and wealth.


message 3: by Erica (new) - added it

Erica | 46 comments Hello everyone!

I am hosting this discussion for this book. I am not a native English speaker so I apologize my grammar mistakes.
Can't wait to start the book and have a lively discussion about it.

This book won the second place in Goodreads 2017 choice awards in a category Best History and Biography.
I started reading this book today and just finished the first chapter.

Since it is a true story I was surprised to find it reads more like a fiction book. What I mean is, it grips you from the start and the writer is describing for example the flowers etc in detail which perhaps is not what one would expect from a True Crime book. Like M.A.R. I am glad there are photos in this book. It is a reminder that these terrible things really happened to people and we should not forget about them.

This book is not very long about 291 pages (hardback version) + pages for side notes bibliography.

It is interesting to see how this discussion is going to go now that there is a second thread with spoilers.

On a side note, this book made me curious about the author and I can see he has written two other books: The lost city of Z and The Devil and Sherlock Holmes.
Have anyone read these books?


Tonya Mathis | 75 comments I finished reading the book awhile ago. I haven't read any other books by the author, but I did, I'm not sure if enjoyed is the right word because I was sickened and outraged by what happened all those years ago. Why was this not taught in school during US history?


message 5: by M.A.R. (new)

M.A.R. Unger | 127 comments Much of "history" is omitted in schools in the US and elsewhere. History is also re-written to show modern interpretations and political correctness. This can be seen in films and TV shows. When I contacted the History Channel to dispute the "conclusion" reached in one segment, the response in writing was that the channel's goal is entertainment, not historical accuracy.
What fascinated me in the book were telling comments like "I don't work. I married an Osage." The book did read like a mystery novel, and the motivation goes to "follow the money.'" It seems man's greed knows no boundaries. Need I say I really liked this book. REALLY liked it.


RJ - Slayer of Trolls (hawk5391yahoocom) I'm starting this one today. I previously read The Lost City of Z A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon by David Grann The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon by the same author and enjoyed it a lot.


Pamela Mclaren | 186 comments Just finally bought this book and must get started on reading it. I've read the The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon by David Grann and like you, Randy, I enjoyed it a lot. I have a feeling that we will have lots to talk about regarding the new book.


message 8: by Gem , Moderator & Admin (new) - rated it 4 stars

Gem  | 1335 comments Mod
> When I contacted the History Channel to dispute the "conclusion" reached in one segment, the response in writing was that the channel's goal is entertainment, not historical accuracy.

Good to know, I don't think I'll be watching any more programs on the History Channel.


Jamie Zaccaria | 157 comments I started this on audiobook yesterday. I want to look up the photos but I don't want to get spoiled. Feel free to share any with me with general descriptions lol

I also read and loved The Lost City of Z. I didn't even know it was the same author until today!


Jamie Zaccaria | 157 comments This was a wonderfully written story that sheds light on a horrific time in our history that we should all know about. The fact that this even happened blows my mind and the twists and turns of it read like fiction. The book had an important narrative and was an enjoyable, and sobering, read.


PattyMacDotComma | 403 comments No spoilers in my review, but I did include a couple of the wonderful photographs. What a terrific historical resource as well as a murder mystery. An amazing book by an obviously experienced writer. I had no idea I'd enjoy it so much!
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


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