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The Girl Before
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Archive - Group Reads > The Girl Before by J.P. Delaney (no spoilers) - June 2018

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message 1: by Gem , Moderator & Admin (last edited May 30, 2018 11:34AM) (new)

Gem  | 1339 comments Mod
Hello fellow Crime, Mystery, and Thriller readers! This discussion is about The Girl Before by J.P. Delaney and your host is Nguyen.
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Information about Spoilers

Please note no spoilers should be revealed in this discussion.
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The Girl Before by J.P. Delaney The Girl Before by J.P. Delaney The Girl Before by J.P. Delaney

Summary

Please make a list of every possession you consider essential to your life.

The request seems odd, even intrusive - and for the two women who answer, the consequences are devastating.

Emma

Reeling from a traumatic break-in, Emma wants a new place to live. But none of the apartments she sees are affordable or feel safe. Until One Folgate Street. The house is an architectural masterpiece: a minimalist design of pale stone, plate glass, and soaring ceilings. But there are rules. The enigmatic architect who designed the house retains full control: no books, no throw pillows, no photos or clutter or personal effects of any kind. The space is intended to transform its occupant - and it does.

Jane

After a personal tragedy, Jane needs a fresh start. When she finds One Folgate Street, she is instantly drawn to the space - and to its aloof but seductive creator. Moving in, Jane soon learns about the untimely death of the home's previous tenant, a woman similar to Jane in age and appearance. As Jane tries to untangle truth from lies, she unwittingly follows the same patterns, makes the same choices, crosses paths with the same people, and experiences the same terror as the girl before.


Beth  (techeditor) | 1011 comments I could have sworn I already posted this.

This book is Emma’s and Jane’s stories of craziness and lies.

The psychological conditions presented are real and possible, I suppose. But who would really agree to the architect’s ridiculous demands? That spoiled the story for me.

Also, as an editor, I gagged during Emma's chapters. In her first-person accounts, she uses "go" and "goes" rather than "say" and "says." Plus, she uses no quotation marks.

Although this was my first experience with a narrator's use of "I go" and "he goes" in a novel, I have noticed more and more authors' nonuse of quotation marks in dialog. Quotation marks were invented to add readability, that is, make books easier to read. Therefore, their nonuse is rude.


Beth  (techeditor) | 1011 comments I could have sworn I already posted this.

This book is Emma’s and Jane’s stories of craziness and lies.

The psychological conditions presented are real and possible, I suppose. But who would really agree to the architect’s ridiculous demands? That spoiled the story for me.

Also, as an editor, I gagged during Emma's chapters. In her first-person accounts, she uses "go" and "goes" rather than "say" and "says." Plus, she uses no quotation marks.

Although this was my first experience with a narrator's use of "I go" and "he goes" in a novel, I have noticed more and more authors' nonuse of quotation marks in dialog. Quotation marks were invented to add readability, that is, make books easier to read. Therefore, their nonuse is rude.


Georgia | 52 comments Again it's me! I read this book also some months ago. Not one of my favorites. I respect your noticing the changes new authors are making in the use of rules of the English language. I wonder if they don't know the difference or if they feel their audience does not.


Nguyen Xuan | 16 comments Beth, I agree, the architect's demands were at best ridiculous. That's one of the reason why there were no other tenants than Emma and Jane over a long period.


Beth  (techeditor) | 1011 comments Georgia wrote: "Again it's me! I read this book also some months ago. Not one of my favorites. I respect your noticing the changes new authors are making in the use of rules of the English language. I wonder if th..."

I think that authors who don't use quotation marks think that they're making some kind of statement. Notice that in Jane's chapters she did use quotation marks


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