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Black Like Me
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Black Like Me--John Howard Green

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message 1: by Dylan (new)

Dylan | 12 comments Black Like Me—John Howard Green
Reviewed by Dylan Wong

Black Like Me, written by John Howard Green, is a true story that took place during the 1960s in southern United States. During this time in America, discrimination towards the African-Americans was highly prevalent and in some situations, encouraged. Green, a middle-aged Caucasian journalist and author, decided to perform an outrageous and inexplicable experiment. With the help of medicine, he would darken the shade of his skin to appear as if he were an African-American. There were many motives as to conduct such a dangerous trial. He wanted to prove that the color of one’s skin does not automatically place false labels upon them. Green also desired to understand the African-Americans better, and be able to experience the hatred and unkindness that was shown to them.

Overall, I thought that this was a great non-fiction book that was informative, but also provided personal insights from the author. I enjoyed that the book was written in the form of a journal. It was easy to identify progression and was presented in an organized fashion. Black Like Me explained stories and details, different from what would be learned in a history class at school. The greatest aspect of the story were Green’s insights. He displays truth, intelligence, and courage through all his thoughts and perceptions. Green really encourages the reader to think about the racial issue and forge their own opinion on the subject. Although I did enjoy reading this book, I found Green’s style of writing to be quite boring at times. It didn’t seem to spark much excitement.


message 2: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Rodriguez | 7 comments How long is the book? It sounds very interesting, but I do have a tendency to get bored with slower books. Would you say it was worth the read?
Also, were there people in the story that got upset with what he did change his skin color? It seems like a fairly controversial thing to do.


message 3: by Des'Ree (new)

Des'Ree Henry | 16 comments This book seems really intresting! Would you recommend this book to students? And was there anything challenging about the book?


message 4: by Bella (new)

Bella | 15 comments I am surprised I have never heard of this before. This seems like such a wild thing to do, I would think it would still be relevant.


message 5: by Jay (new)

Jay | 13 comments I like books that are based off actual events. So it does sound really good and it's even cooler how the author takes the writing as journal entries.


message 6: by Dylan (new)

Dylan | 12 comments Nancy wrote: "How long is the book? It sounds very interesting, but I do have a tendency to get bored with slower books. Would you say it was worth the read?
Also, were there people in the story that got upset ..."


The book is a couple hundred pages. Overall, I didn't think it was worth the read. It was an extremely slow read that took me forever to finish, and it was quite boring at times. African-Americans supported Green's experiment, but the Caucasians were furious and classified him as a Negro.


message 7: by Dylan (new)

Dylan | 12 comments Des'Ree wrote: "This book seems really intresting! Would you recommend this book to students? And was there anything challenging about the book?"

I wouldn't recommend to read this book for pleasure, but I do recommend it to students that would like to learn more about life when segregation was prevalent. It was definitely a challenging read with difficult vocabulary.


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