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The Book Thief
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message 1: by Marnie (new) - added it

Marnie (marniekeister)


message 2: by Codie (new)

Codie | 61 comments Such a deep, detailed book. The movie has nothing on it, although it tries.


Roseanne I love this book so much that I didn't even bother with the movie. I could not understand how they would even come close to portraying Death right.


message 4: by Sheila (new)

Sheila (sheilaj) I highly recommend the audiobook of The Book Thief


Colleen  | 47 comments One of my favorite novels of all time. The movie wasn't bad - just not much you could do.


Linda  | 915 comments I didn't love it as much as most.......not that it was bad, just after a while, got tedious. I think I gave detailed review


Linda | 10 comments The Book Thief is the second best book read for me....The Good Earth was my first, I plan on re-reading TGE so that I can read the rest of the trilogy this year.


message 8: by MJD (new) - rated it 5 stars

MJD I appreciated the narrative structure. Non-traditional, but not disorienting.


Diane Just finished The Book Thief. I really enjoyed it. I thought it was interesting how the story was told from Death's perspective during WWII. Most WWII books I have read had Jewish people as the main character. I thought it was interesting to tell the story of a non-Jewish family and what it was like to live in Germany during that time-frame. The author also developed the characters quite well and added some entertaining and endearing sections during a rough historical time period.


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

Very good book


Paula I didn't find out until I'd finished The Book Thief that it was a YA book. It certainly had appeal to me, and I'm far from that age group. Death as the narrator is a splendid idea. Death came across as an almost tender character.


message 12: by NancyJ, Moderator (new) - rated it 5 stars

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 1835 comments Mod
Paula wrote: "I didn't find out until I'd finished The Book Thief that it was a YA book. It certainly had appeal to me, and I'm far from that age group. Death as the narrator is a splendid idea. Death came acros..."

I just heard a funny segment in my car, that makes me want to read this book even more. It's from The Storied life of A.J. Fikry. He's a bookstore owner, and a regular customer comes in demanding a refund for a terrible book he recommended. She said it's terribly insensitive to give an 82 year old woman a book narrated by death! She was mad for having her tears jerked, and because she had to stay up all night to finish it. After letting her rant, he mildly said: I"m sorry, most of our customers rather liked The Book Thief. It was very funny the way he wrote it.


message 13: by Ella (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ella (ellamc) | 300 comments This book stands out as one of my best reads of 2018, and I agree that it's one of the smartest YA books ever penned (typed, I guess.) It's so subtle, and so lovely, and even if you're upset by it, you stay up all night to finish it.

When I read it, I found myself thinking of some of the lines while washing dishes one night, and I ended up doubled over in my kitchen sobbing -- suds everywhere. This book seriously affected me, more strongly than many other "wonderful" books. I know people sometimes think it's schmaltzy, but it's actually just really beautiful.


message 14: by [deleted user] (new)

The movie was also very good


Paula NancyJ wrote: "Paula wrote: "I didn't find out until I'd finished The Book Thief that it was a YA book. It certainly had appeal to me, and I'm far from that age group. Death as the narrator is a splendid idea. De..."

The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry is a favorite of mine. My city library scheduled it a few years ago as the Battle Creek Reads community experience. (we all read the book together during a set period and the author comes to town to speak and do a Q & A.)

This book is on my list of "Repeaters."


Linda  | 915 comments Paula wrote: "NancyJ wrote: "Paula wrote: "I didn't find out until I'd finished The Book Thief that it was a YA book. It certainly had appeal to me, and I'm far from that age group. Death as the narrator is a sp..."

Woot woot to the Battle Creek I know!.........as in, "They're GRRRReat!" ? :)


Diane What also struck me with this book was it's similarities to A Tree Grows In Brooklyn. I just finished both of these books as part of the Great American Book Read. Both lead characters in the stories learn to read under tough circumstances and then develop an immense fascination with reading. Perhaps that is one of the reasons that fervent readers (both young and old) have been drawn to these books and continue to grow personally because of them.


Linda  | 915 comments Diane wrote: "What also struck me with this book was it's similarities to A Tree Grows In Brooklyn. I just finished both of these books as part of the Great American Book Read. Both lead characters in the storie..."
I know that I, too, love books about people who love books. "The Shadow of the Wind" and "The Old Man who Read Love Stories" are among my favorites, and they're both about people who love to read.


Diane Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "Diane wrote: "What also struck me with this book was it's similarities to A Tree Grows In Brooklyn. I just finished both of these books as part of the Great American Book Read. Both lead characters..."

Thanks Linda - I added those two books to my To Read list!


Linda  | 915 comments Diane wrote: "Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "Diane wrote: "What also struck me with this book was it's similarities to A Tree Grows In Brooklyn. I just finished both of these books as part of the Great A..."

Oh, good! I hope you enjoy them!
I always used to say I'd read Zafon's grocery list, however, the 3rd book in that series left me underwhelmed. And I've re-read "The Old Man" about 8 times or more. Every time I'm teaching that in class, I get excited about being in class again.


message 21: by Heather (last edited Jul 16, 2018 09:25AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Heather (bruyere) I'm obviously in the minority, but I didn't like this book. I found it really childish. I also don't like the trend of writing novels about WWII, when there are perfectly good true stories. The whole "death" narrator was annoying and I was glad they at least dropped the color themes early on. The title turned out to be just a cute title, and didn't really have much to do with the story, which also annoyed me. The only positive, to me, was a viewpoint from the German side, considering almost all stories in books are from the Jewish side. I've been to the town that this book takes place in, so I had mixed feelings on the location of the novel and believably.


message 22: by Joy, Your Obedient Servant (new) - rated it 3 stars

Joy (jammons42) | 510 comments Mod
Bruyere wrote: "I'm obviously in the minority, but I didn't like this book. I found it really childish. I also don't like the trend of writing novels about WWII, when there are perfectly good true stories. The who..."

I kind of agree! I didn't love this book, but I didn't hate it either. I liked death as the narrator, because it was different and took some of the usual emotions of a holocaust book out of the mix.

The most interesting part foe me that it was the story of a German family, not a Jewish one.

I was also annoyed by the title having very little relation to the story told.


message 23: by Heather (last edited Jul 16, 2018 05:29PM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Heather (bruyere) I've read a lot of autobiographies and I was surprised to only end up reading one who was an SS. I really do think we need a better understanding of "the other side." When I was in Germany and Austria recently, I was interested/surprised by how things were portrayed. It made me really consider how a country moves forward. Of course we have similar ideas to explore with our Civil War. I've been listening to a Great Courses on the topic and have found that I grew up with a very skewed viewpoint (by being on the "winning side").


Linda  | 915 comments Bruyere wrote: "I've read a lot of autobiographies and I was surprised to only end up reading one who was an SS. I really do think we need a better understanding of "the other side." When I was in Germany and Aust..."

And the stigma...........a friend of mine, who was born in the U.S., used to feel guilt because her mother (who was German) had been a switchboard operator during the war...........she felt guilt for her mother's just doing what she needed to do to survive......it was so odd.


message 25: by Joy, Your Obedient Servant (new) - rated it 3 stars

Joy (jammons42) | 510 comments Mod
Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "Bruyere wrote: "I've read a lot of autobiographies and I was surprised to only end up reading one who was an SS. I really do think we need a better understanding of "the other side." When I was in ..."

Obviously, I believe it's important to have stories about the holocaust, because even today people don't believe it ever happened. I do think a lot of "ordinary german" stories get overlooked when talking about that part of history because so many other things were so horrific. That being said, I think it's a good perspective to explore if only to acknowledge that great evil doesn't present itself as such and by the time most people catch on to it, it's probably too late.


message 26: by Ella (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ella (ellamc) | 300 comments No time to dwell on the book. I'm just here to point out that there were many German Jews. Jews had been the height of German society at points throughout history. Needless to say, WWII changed things.

I do appreciate reading the non-Allied sides of this war, AND I agree there are too many stories just pushed into this timeframe to create conflict and emotional issues. Lately my interest has been in the Soviet historical view of WWII.


Heather (bruyere) I've become interested in the Soviet side as well after my trip to Dachau. I'm embarrassed to say that I wasn't aware, much, of the many political prisoners.


Kirsten  (kmcripn) I haven't seen the film. But I read the book YEARS ago. I loved it. The narrative structure, the setting, the characters. IT made me cry.


message 29: by Jess (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jess Penhallow | 28 comments I just finished this book today and sobbed my way through the last 50 pages! What a lovely and beautiful book.


Kirsten  (kmcripn) Me, too, Jess. My dad laughed at me at the time. "It's the Holocaust, it doesn't end well!!"


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