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The Help
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message 1: by Marnie (new) - added it

Marnie (marniekeister)


Roseanne Oh I loved this book. The terrible awful. lol


Sheila (sheilaj) I think this was the only book/movie combo where I loved them both.


Roseanne I never saw the movie but I would watch this one.


message 5: by Denise (last edited Jun 01, 2018 09:12AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Denise Lauron (dlauron) | 13 comments Both the movie and the book were great. An easy read.


message 6: by Parker (new) - added it

Parker | 204 comments Denise wrote: "Both the movie and the book were great. An easy read."

I got to a point where I just had to quit reading, it made me so angry.

I was involved with the Civil Rights movement, so I lived through this period.


aPriL does feral sometimes  (cheshirescratch) Spectacular novel, manages to put everything in about this era.


message 8: by NancyJ, Moderator (last edited Jun 07, 2018 07:13PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 1835 comments Mod
Parker wrote: "
I got to a point where I just had to quit reading, it made me so angry.

I was involved with the Civil Rights movement, so I ..."


Some of the character's beliefs were really shocking. I had heard of Jim Crow laws, but I never knew just how crazy they were. It was eye opening, and I think that's why this book was so important. It was inspiring to see people working together to fight for change. The book also had some very tender and funny moments, and it was very satisfying.

Where did you work in the Civil Rights Movement?


Paula Before I read the book, I listened to an interview with Kathryn Stockett on NPR. She explained a lot about how she grew up with "help" and how it was normal for them. I believe her book demonstrates her comments about how her family loved the people who served them. But she also mentioned that her views had changed, which is why she felt led to write about how a whole people group needed justice. The movie screenplay followed the story fairly accurately and that's something I always appreciate.


message 10: by Parker (new) - added it

Parker | 204 comments NancyJ, I was very young (6 years old) when I got involved, and most of it consisted of writing letters to the editor and calling my congresspeople. I was too young to march, and the town I grew up in had few integration problems. I also called out anyone (including grownups) who made racial slurs. There was a board formed my freshman year of high school to resolve complaints made by black students and I was chosen to be a part of it (I was the only underclassman). My Living History career for the past 23 years has been educating people about the contributions of enslaved Afticans (yes, the Movement stretches back that far!). I'm involved with Black Lives Matter, the NAACP, and The Urban League (mostly periphially, as I don't drive).


message 11: by NancyJ, Moderator (new) - rated it 5 stars

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 1835 comments Mod
I wanted to add that this is a perfect book for a book club. If people in your real-life group missed it, I would strongly recommend it. The book gives us a lot to talk about. It's serious, dramatic, heartbreaking, heartwarming, and at times very funny. There are characters to love, and some you'll love to hate.


message 12: by NancyJ, Moderator (last edited Jun 08, 2018 09:10AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 1835 comments Mod
Parker wrote: "NancyJ, I was very young (6 years old) when I got involved, and most of it consisted of writing letters to the editor and calling my congresspeople. I was too young to march, and the town I grew up..."

Wow, that's impressive. An activist at the age of 6! I don't think I was aware of anything outside my own little life at that age. When I was a little older than that, my best friend's father agreed to let us go with him to civil rights demonstrations, and I think an anti-war demonstration. It was eye-opening and exciting for us. They were peaceful, and there was a lot of talking rather than yelling (at least from what I can remember). I remember singing We Shall Overcome around a huge camp fire on night. Our mothers wouldn't allow us to go to a really big march or down south. (I also wasn't allowed to go to Woodstock.) I thought my parents were so unreasonable. That cracks me up now.


message 13: by NancyJ, Moderator (new) - rated it 5 stars

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 1835 comments Mod
Paula wrote: "Before I read the book, I listened to an interview with Kathryn Stockett on NPR. She explained a lot about how she grew up with "help" and how it was normal for them. I believe her..."

That was one thing I couldn't understand. So many white kids were being practically raised by black women. It would expect that the emotional bond would help those kids to reject discriminatory attitudes later on. That love did seem to rub off on some people, like Stockett, and thank goodness.


message 14: by Parker (new) - added it

Parker | 204 comments NancyJ, I was involved in the anti-war movement as well. Protested, marched, sang...the whole gamut. My mum wouldn't allow me to go to Woodstock either, even though the friends who wanted to take me were super-responsible (some of my Vietnam vet "big brothers"). I was unbelievably ticked off at her. Now, as a mother myself, I totally understand.

Mum and Da always told me that I was an old soul, so maybe that's why I was more aware. I'm also an only child, basically raised with adults.

Mum used to tell a funny story about me: there was a book she read to me when I was tiny (before I started reading by myself) which involved a boy getting hurt. Mum said that book upset me so much that I'd start crying because someone was injured and I couldn't stand it. I saw pictures on the TV of people being attacked by dogs and injured by fire hoses, and I asked my Da why. He explained, and I stood up, put my hands on my hips and announced, "That's just not right and I'm gonna do something about it!" Thus an activist was born.


Colleen  | 47 comments Like everyone, I enjoyed this book too. But I did like The Healing by Jonathan O’Dell more. (Sorry, I’m on the app.) Not quite exactly the same kind of storyline but I thought it was really well done. He has written other great southern novels.


message 16: by NancyJ, Moderator (new) - rated it 5 stars

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 1835 comments Mod
Parker wrote: "NancyJ, I was involved in the anti-war movement as well. Protested, marched, sang...the whole gamut. My mum wouldn't allow me to go to Woodstock either, even though the friends who wanted to take m..."

I wouldn't have let my kids go either, even if they were older than i was then. I honestly thought I was grown up enough. My dad always said I was 12 going on 30. I really wanted to be 10 years older to be able to participate in all the things that were going on in the late 60's and early 70s.

I968 and 1969 were two pivotal years in the US for both good and bad reasons. It was an exciting time.


"That's just not right and I'm gonna do something about it!"

I love to see moral courage!

This reminds me of the discussion on the 1984 discussion about the ability to speak out against something wrong.


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