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The Eustace Diamonds (Palliser, #3)
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The Trollope Project - Archives > The Eustace Diamonds May 27-June 2: Chapters 49-56

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message 1: by Frances, Moderator (new) - rated it 4 stars

Frances (francesab) | 1937 comments Mod
Curiouser and curiouser, the saga of the diamonds become even more confused with the second robbery. Who do you think is doing this? Is it the same thief as before?

We have the reintroduction of both Lady Glencora and of Lord Fawn, and I'm rather hoping we will get back to the saga of the various matches currently on hold-Lucy and Frank, Lucinda and Sir Griffin, Lady Eustace and Lord Fawn/Lord George/Frank. Which do you think will end in marriage? It is hard to see, from a 21st century perspective, that any of the above will work out, or be happy, but this is the 19th century, and marriage was about so much more than love.

I am enjoying Lady Glendora's return. I particularly enjoyed her letter to the Duke about Plantagenet's speech in the house about the currency reform

My Dear Duke,

Plantagenet was on his legs last night for three hours and three quarters, and I sat through it all. As far as I could observe I was the only person in the house who listened to him. I'm sure Mr Gresham was fast asleep. It was quite piteous to see some of them yawning. Plantagenet did it very well, and I almost think I understood him. They seem to say that nobody on the other side will take trouble enough to make regular opposition, but that there are men in the City who will write letters to the newspapers, and get up a sort of Bank clamour. Plantagenet says nothing about it, but there is a do-or-die manner with him which is quite tragical. The House was up at eleven, when he came home and eat three oysters, drank a glass of beer, and slept well.


I loved the affection and support and understanding shown by Lady Glencora towards her husband, and it warms my heart to see how well their marriage has survived and thrived since its rocky beginnings.

Please share your thoughts on any of the above, or on what you most enjoyed in this section.


message 2: by Lori, Moderator (new) - rated it 3 stars

Lori Goshert (lori_laleh) | 1440 comments Mod
I went ahead and finished the book, but I didn't take detailed notes for this section.

I think I remember feeling exasperated with all these characters and thinking all of them deserved whatever was coming to them, with the exceptions of Lucy and Lucinda. Lucinda just because I kind of like her, and she seems to be so firmly under her aunt's control. And I like her bluntness. Lucy got on my nerves before with her perfect trust in Frank, but now that she's starting to see he's a human and not a god, I wish her the best (which might or might not include Frank).

It was nice to see Lady Glencora again, and the Chilterns and Madame Max. I suppose we'll see them more in the next book since we'll be back to Phineas Finn.


message 3: by Phrodrick (new)

Phrodrick I continue to find it hard to think of Lizzy as anything but a ninny. In this wayshe is a perfect match for Lord Fawn. He cannot make a decision except in terms of what his married daughter demands of him and what others might think.
Lizzy would be a scam artist except that she cannot hold a single thought for two pages. Rarely does she stay focused for two paragraphs.
Frank seems to love temptation but remains just this side of, Lucy continues to live on hope.

Duchess Glencora seems to be here so that we can get an outsiders take on the affair of the necklace, but how anyone can continue to support Lizzy now that her stolen necklace has been stolen again is a tad hard to take,.
Me thinks we are to realize that Glencora is hardly the deepest thinker and is given to placing her sense of romance ahead of mere common sense.
The Duke of Omnium, sorry this reads more like padding, but it is of possible interest that his wife maintains a a loving relationship with him. Besides these are political novels, so poof we have politics.

Over all this reads like Trollope was experimenting with the crime novel. Ratiocination made its way into the literary consulting detective around 1840. Side note: In 1822 Home Sec Robert Peel had begun the process of making a professional police department for London. The literary exploitation of investigative and deductive crime solving would have been fairly new and gaining popularity as a literary form.
1841 The Murders in the Rue Morgue
1871 The Eustace Diamonds
1887 (in A Study in Scarlet),


message 4: by Lori, Moderator (new) - rated it 3 stars

Lori Goshert (lori_laleh) | 1440 comments Mod
Phrodrick wrote: "I continue to find it hard to think of Lizzy as anything but a ninny. In this wayshe is a perfect match for Lord Fawn."

I agree. Lord Fawn's spinelessness makes him a really despicable character.


Brian E Reynolds | 755 comments I think of Ms. Hittaway, who I thought was Lord Fawn's married sister, as quite the imperious character, maybe because the same actress plays Ms. Hittaway in the Pallisers TV miniseries and Lady Catherine de Bourgh (Pride & Prejudice) in the Death at Pemberley miniseries.


message 6: by Frances, Moderator (new) - rated it 4 stars

Frances (francesab) | 1937 comments Mod
Trollope readers-when would people like to start the next novel, Phineas Redux? Would you like to
a) Start early July, a couple of weeks after finishing The Eustace Diamonds.
b) take a summer break, and start in early September.

I'm posting this question in several of the discussions, feel free to answer wherever you find it!


message 7: by Rosemarie, Moderator (new) - rated it 3 stars

Rosemarie | 2941 comments Mod
Mrs. Hittaway is Lord Fawn's married sister, a real know-it-all.
I was not impressed with Glencora's meddling in a situation that she doesn't fully understand. Lord Fawn may not be a hero, but he isn't that bad, just weak. He was surrounded by doting women, so he really never had any reason to be strong. Now that he needs to come to a decision, he has no idea what to do.

I think Sir George stole the diamonds.


message 8: by Frances, Moderator (new) - rated it 4 stars

Frances (francesab) | 1937 comments Mod
Rosemarie wrote: "Mrs. Hittaway is Lord Fawn's married sister, a real know-it-all.
I was not impressed with Glencora's meddling in a situation that she doesn't fully understand. Lord Fawn may not be a hero, but he i..."


Agreed-I just felt that poor, not terribly bright Lord Fawn was simply in way over his head with the scheming and not-playing-by-the-rules Lizzie.


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