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Tristram Shandy | 4856 comments Mod
Dear Curiosities,

Alas, I must confess that I did not really enjoy “The Steam Excursion”, which was published in the Monthly Magazine in October 1834. In fact, I found it hard to concentrate on since it does not really tell us a story but focuses on a kind of joyride among middle class families, probably also with the intention of finding possible matches for their unmarried daughters. This could have been interesting as a chapter of a novel where we would have had more background information on the characters and where, consequently, those characters would have been of more interest to us.

Here is the plot, in a nutshell: Mr. Percy Noakes, a law student who apparently does not pay a lot of attention to his studies but is more interested in social life, and his friend, “the funny gentleman”, Mr. Hardy, organize a steam excursion on behalf of Mrs. Taunton and her daughters. Somehow, there is also Mr. Briggs involved. Mr. Briggs is the younger son of Mrs. Briggs, who also has three guitar-playing daughters, and who is the sworn enemy of Mrs. Taunton – as well as the Misses Briggs are the sworn enemies to the Misses Taunton. We get a glimpse of the difficulties arising from organizing the trip – and we get the trip itself, which suffers slightly from bad weather and from everyone finally suffering from seasickness without wanting to show it.

The narrator describes all these events in great detail but at the end, the reader – at least I – does not feel that the story has left any great impact. It’s amusing to read, but is there more to it?

Some thoughts and observations

Even in this rather average story, Dickens shows himself as both a great observer and a writer who can cast his observations into original and funny language. How, for instance, do you like his “town-made children with parenthetical legs” in the first paragraph of the story?

The first paragraph also tells us of Mr. Percy Noakes that

”[h]e had a large circle of acquaintance, and seldom dined at his own expense. He used to talk politics to papas, flatter the vanity of mammas, do the amiable to their daughters, make pleasure engagements with their sons, and romp with the younger branches.”


A little later, we learn:

”It may readily be imagined that these numerous avocations were rather calculated to interfere with Mr. Percy Noakes’s professional studies. Mr. Percy Noakes was perfectly aware of the fact, and had, therefore, after mature reflection, made up his mind not to study at all—a laudable determination, to which he adhered in the most praiseworthy manner.”


We also learn that he has run up certain debts, and that he also resorts to prevarication in order to stall his creditors. What kind of person is Mr. Noakes? Is he a social adventurer, like Mr. Horatio Sparkins, whom we met last time, or is he simply a good-natured, happy-go-lucky young man who wants to make the most of his youth? How do you judge our hero?

There are some details in the story – details of no consequence – that reminded me of later novels. In one description, the narrator mentions

”[a] little sweep […] standing at a short distance, casting a longing eye at the tempting delicacies […]”


Does this also remind you of a later character appearing in one of Dickens’s novels?

A little later, we get a passage, where Dickens – notwithstanding Victorian sensibilities – mentions prostitutes, which I found interesting in that a prostitute plays an important role in Oliver Twist. But, as in that novel, Dickens would not use the word but leave it to the reader to make the necessary implications:

”The wan looks and gaudy finery of the thinly-clad women contrasted as strangely with the gay sunlight, as did their forced merriment with the boisterous hilarity of the two young men, who, now and then, varied their amusements by ‘bonneting’ the proprietor of this itinerant coffee-house.”


Quite frankly, I did not come across a lot of interesting things in this story. The genteel war between the Tauntons and the Briggses is a template for similar satirical passages in many later novels, and it does a good deal to carry the reader’s mild (?) interest along.

Did you come across anything worth mentioning?


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Kim | 6388 comments Mod
Tristram wrote: " It’s amusing to read, but is there more to it?"

No.

[a] little sweep […] standing at a short distance, casting a longing eye at the tempting delicacies […]”


Does this also remind you of a later character appearing in one of Dickens’s novels?


Yes

Did you come across anything worth mentioning?

Yes, here are the illustrations. :-)



"Steam Excursion — Pt. 1"

George Cruikshank

1839

Text Illustrated:

Mr. Hardy, in a blue jacket and waistcoat, white trousers, silk stockings, and pumps — in full aquatic costume, with a straw hat on his head, and an immense telescope under his arm; and there was the young gentleman with the green spectacles, in nankeen inexplicables, with a ditto waistcoat and bright buttons, like the pictures of Paul — not the saint, but he of Virginia notoriety. The remainder of the committee, dressed in white hats, light jackets, waistcoats, and trousers, looked something between waiters and West India planters. — "Tales," Chapter 7."

"Now," said Mr. Percy Noakes, who had just ascended from the fore-cabin, where he had been busily engaged in decanting the wine, "if the Misses Briggs will oblige us with something before dinner, I am sure we shall be very much delighted."

One of those hums of admiration followed the suggestion, which one frequently hears in society, when nobody has the most distant notion what he is expressing his approval of. The three Misses Briggs looked modestly at their mamma, and the mamma looked approvingly at her daughters, and Mrs. Taunton looked scornfully at all of them. The Misses Briggs asked for their guitars, and several gentlemen seriously damaged the cases in their anxiety to present them. Then, there was a very interesting production of three little keys for the aforesaid cases, and a melodramatic expression of horror at finding a string broken; and a vast deal of screwing and tightening, and winding, and tuning, during which Mrs. Briggs expatiated to those near her on the immense difficulty of playing a guitar, and hinted at the wondrous proficiency of her daughters in that mystic art. Mrs. Taunton whispered to a neighbour that it was "quite sickening!" and the Misses Taunton looked as if they knew how to play, but disdained to do it.

At length, the Misses Briggs began in real earnest. It was a new Spanish composition, for three voices and three guitars. The effect was electrical. All eyes were turned upon the captain, who was reported to have once passed through Spain with his regiment, and who must be well acquainted with the national music. He was in raptures. This was sufficient; the trio was encored; the applause was universal; and never had the Tauntons suffered such a complete defeat.

"Bravo! bravo!" ejaculated the captain; — "bravo!" — "Tales," Chapter 7, "The Steam Excursion."


Commentary:

The expanding incomes of the rising middle classes enabled them to become suburbanites with private gardens and "villas" in such developing areas as Norwood and Camberwell. Moreover, these same newly affluent merchants and professionals could begin to spend money on leisure travel or "the vacation," as we now know it. A number of previous illustrations deal with how the middle class used this new "leisure time," going to seaside resorts such as Ramsgate, spending Sunday afternoons in pleasure gardens, and attending outdoor concerts at Vauxhall and The Eagle. Here, Dickens takes a group of bourgeoisie on river-boat excursion down the Thames, the chief organizers being a young law student named Percy Noakes (who bears some resemblance to Dickens) and his stocky friend with the deep laugh, Mr. Hardy (who resembles Dickens's confidant and legal adviser John Forster, whom Dickens met in 1836). The original plan involves steaming "down to the Nore, and back" on a single day, but the vessel runs into rough weather on the return leg, so that the company are not deposited back at Steam Packet Wharf, near the Custom House (London), until 2:00 A. M. the next day. The day begins auspiciously, with a flurry of activity as passengers arrive for the regularly scheduled boats to Margate and Gravesend:

And then the bell at London-bridge wharf rang; and a Margate boat was just starting; and a Gravesend boat was just starting, and people shouted, and porters ran down the steps with luggage that would crush any men but porters; and sloping boards, with bits of wood nailed on them, were placed between the outside boat and the inside boat; and the passengers ran along them, and looked like so many fowls coming out of an area; and then, the bell ceased, and the boards were taken away, and the boats started, and the whole scene was one of the most delightful bustle and confusion. — "The Steam Excursion,".

The steam excursion organized by Percy Noakes with the General Steam Navigation Company begins and ends off the Custom House, between Billingsgate Market and the Tower of London. The destination of Percy Noakes' afternoon excursion is neither a port nor a seaside resort, but a lightship (established in 1732) on a sandbank known as The Nore at the mouth of the Thames Estuary. Until 1964, the Nore marked the seaward limit of the Port of London Authority, for it is the point at which the river meets the North Sea, about midway between Havengore Creek in Essex and Warden Point in Kent.

Brighton, England's first seaside resort, began its transformation from sleepy fishing to "London by the Sea" about 1750. Other 19th c. Channel resorts include Folkestone, Eastbourne, Bournemouth, Torquay-Paignton, Hastings, Newhaven, Worthing, Bognor Regis, resorts on the Isle of Wight, Margate, Broadstairs, Weymouth, Exemouth, and, of course, Ramsgate, the destination of the noveau-riche Tuggses in the 1836 Chapman and Hall "Library of Fiction" short story. As early as 1824 regularly scheduled paddle-wheelers provided faster service than the previous sailing packets between the Port of London and the Channel resorts, making the trip in as little as eight hours under steam, as opposed to anything up to 72 hours on the old sailing hoys. The Margate Steam Packet Company was the first new firm set up to exploit the new technology, offering regular service in 1815. Marc Isambard Brunel's 112 ft. Regent, built by Henry Maudsley on the Thames, entered the London-to-Margate run as a mailboat in 1816. The next year, the Gravesend Steam Packet Company began regular service. However, the growth of British seaside resorts really began in the 1840s, when relatively cheap railway fares granted even the working classes access to the seaside, in particular Blackpool in the north of England, although the southern resorts were not connected to the metropolis by railway until the 1860s.

As Frederic G. Kitton notes, Cruikshank had to re-engrave this illustration for the Chapman and Hall serialisation, and the subsequent 1839 anthology:

During the following year (1837) Macrone published a Second Series of the "Sketches" in one volume, uniform in size and character with its predecessors, and containing ten etchings by Cruikshank; for the second edition of this extra volume two additional illustrations were done, viz., "The Last Cab-Driver" and "May-day in the Evening." It was at this time that Dickens repurchased from Macrone the entire copyright of the "Sketches," and arranged with Chapman & Hall for a complete edition, to be issued in shilling monthly parts, octavo size, the first number appearing in November of that year. The completed work contained all the Cruikshank plates (except that entitled "The Free and Easy," which, for some unexplained reason, was cancelled) and the following [twelve] new subjects: "The Parish Engine," "The Broker's Man," "Our Next-door Neighbours" [sic], "Early Coaches," "Public Dinners," "The Gin-Shop," "Making a Night of It," "The Boarding-House," "The Tuggses at Ramsgate," "The Steam Excursion," "Mrs. Joseph Porter," and "Mr. Watkins Tottle." — "George Cruikshank, p. 4.

Dickens mentions that the musical entertainment is a central aspect of the planning directed by Percy Noakes, with a guitar concert winning out in committee:

If Miss Sophia Taunton learnt a new song, two of the Miss Briggses came out with a new duet. The Tauntons had once gained a temporary triumph with the assistance of a harp, but the Briggses brought three guitars into the field, and effectually routed the enemy.

Accordingly, Cruikshank has depicted the three Miss Briggs playing a "Spanish composition" on their guitars, with Hardy (dressed as a sailor and holding a telescope) to the right, and the helmsman, left rear, suggesting that the concert is on the rear deck. A first edition copy of the print, dated 1836, in the Victoria and Albert Museum, is catalogued as "An etching featuring a group of figures watching a group of three woman play stringed instruments. A man in the background holds a steamship wheel." Cruikshank provides two contrasting scenes, the first for the concert on the downward leg, on the rear deck of the steamer, the second in the cain below decks as the storm hits on the return leg. In the concert scene, Cruikshank focuses on the guitar-playing Misses Briggs and the "facetious" Hardy "in a blue jacket and waistcoat, white trousers, silk stockings, and pumps".

Originally published in the Monthly Magazine for October 1834, the story is a young man's narrative — one can well imagine the agreeable "young-man-about-town" with rooms at Gray's Inn in Holborn, one of the old Inns of Court, as being an extension of twenty-two-year-old Charles Dickens himself, who had worked in the offices of Ellis and Blackmore at Gray's Inn in 1827. Later, attorney Tommy Traddles in David Copperfield has his bachelor lodgings here. However, the second half of the story occurs not in Noakes's bachelor rooms, but on the General Steam Navigation Company vessel on the downward leg, and then returning from The Nore upriver — and encountering extremely rough weather.

Whereas Fred Barnard in the equivalent Household Edition illustrations of forty years later captures precise moments in the text (although the first is given in narrative rather than in dialogue), George Cruikshank has provided prolonged scenes — the Misses Briggs' giving their musical performance — "a new Spanish composition, for three voices and three guitars" (190), and the guests' suffering from seasickness as cabin is turned topsy-turvey by the rising wind, prior to their staggering on deck for air:

The party had by this time reached their destination, and put about on their return home. The wind, which had been with them the whole day, was now directly in their teeth; the weather had become gradually more and more overcast; and the sky, water, and shore were all of that dull, heavy, uniform lead colour. . . .


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The Steam Excursion - Pt. 2

George Cruikshank
"I beg your pardon, sir," said the steward, running up to Mr. Percy Noakes, "I beg your pardon, sir, but the gentleman as just went on deck — him with the green spectacles — is uncommon bad, to be sure; and the young man as played the wiolin says, that unless he has some brandy he can't answer for the consequences. He says he has a wife and two children, whose werry subsistence depends on his breaking a wessel, and he expects to do so every moment. The flageolet's been werry ill, but he's better, only he's in a dreadful prusperation."

All disguise was now useless; the company staggered on deck; the gentlemen tried to see nothing but the clouds; and the ladies, muffled up in such shawls and cloaks as they had brought with them, lay about on the seats, and under the seats, in the most wretched condition. Never was such a blowing, and raining, and pitching, and tossing, endured by any pleasure party before. Several remonstrances were sent down below, on the subject of Master Fleetwood, but they were totally unheeded in consequence of the indisposition of his natural protectors. That interesting child screamed at the top of his voice, until he had no voice left to scream with; and then, Miss Wakefield began, and screamed for the remainder of the passage.

Mr. Hardy was observed, some hours afterwards, in an attitude which induced his friends to suppose that he was busily engaged in contemplating the beauties of the deep; they only regretted that his taste for the picturesque should lead him to remain so long in a position, very injurious at all times, but especially so, to an individual labouring under a tendency of blood to the head. — "Tales," Chapter 7, "The Steam Excursion."

Commentary

As Frederic G. Kitton notes, Cruikshank had to re-engrave this illustration for the Chapman and Hall serialisation, and the subsequent 1839 anthology:

During the following year (1837) Macrone published a Second Series of the "Sketches" in one volume, uniform in size and character with its predecessors, and containing ten etchings by Cruikshank; for the second edition of this extra volume two additional illustrations were done, viz., "The Last Cab-Driver" and "May-day in the Evening." It was at this time that Dickens repurchased from Macrone the entire copyright of the "Sketches," and arranged with Chapman & Hall for a complete edition, to be issued in shilling monthly parts, octavo size, the first number appearing in November of that year. The completed work contained all the Cruikshank plates (except that entitled "The Free and Easy," which, for some unexplained reason, was cancelled) and the following [twelve] new subjects: "The Parish Engine," "The Broker's Man," "Our Next-door Neighbours" [sic], "Early Coaches," "Public Dinners," "The Gin-Shop," "Making a Night of It," "The Boarding-House," "The Tuggses at Ramsgate," "The Steam Excursion," "Mrs. Joseph Porter," and "Mr. Watkins Tottle." — "George Cruikshank.

Accordingly, Cruikshank has depicted the inconveniences and vicissitudes of steamship travel, with Noakes (centre) trying to preserve order even as the rest of the company experience severe discomfort. A first edition copy of the print, dated 1836, in the Victoria and Albert Museum, is catalogued as "An etching of figures gathered around two tables laden with dishes which appear to be tilting. Many of the figures are holding their heads and mouths. There are baskets with dishes on the floor and two portholes are visible in the background." Cruikshank contrasts the utter chaos in the ding-room with the previous, tranquil scene of the guitar concert on the downward leg, on the rear deck of the steamer. In this second scene, set in the cabin below decks as the storm hits on the return leg, Cruikshank focuses on the general effects of seasickness as young men are about to throw up in their hats, a middle-aged husband comforts his wife (down left) and plates on the table are about to slide off as the tilts towards the left.


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The facetious Hardy

Fred Barnard

Text Illustrated:

Here, the singer was interrupted by varied cries of the most dreadful description, proceeding from some grove in the immediate vicinity of the starboard paddle-box.

"My child!" screamed Mrs. Fleetwood. "My child! it is his voice — I know it."

Mr. Fleetwood, accompanied by several gentlemen, here rushed to the quarter from whence the noise proceeded, and an exclamation of horror burst from the company; the general impression being, that the little innocent had either got his head in the water, or his legs in the machinery.

"What is the matter?" shouted the agonised father, as he returned with the child in his arms.

"Oh! oh! oh!" screamed the small sufferer again.

"What is the matter, dear?" inquired the father once more — hastily stripping off the nankeen frock, for the purpose of ascertaining whether the child had one bone which was not smashed to pieces.

"Oh! oh! — I'm so frightened!"

What at, dear? — what at?" said the mother, soothing the sweet infant.

"Oh! he's been making such dreadful faces at me,’ cried the boy, relapsing into convulsions at the bare recollection.

"He! — who?" cried everybody, crowding round him.

"Oh! — him!" replied the child, pointing at Hardy, who affected to be the most concerned of the whole group.

The real state of the case at once flashed upon the minds of all present, with the exception of the Fleetwoods and the Wakefields. The facetious Hardy, in fulfilment of his promise [to keep the unwelcome children amused by teasing them], had watched the child to a remote part of the vessel, and, suddenly appearing before him with the most awful contortions of visage, had produced his paroxysm of terror. Of course, he now observed that it was hardly necessary for him to deny the accusation; and the unfortunate little victim was accordingly led below, after receiving sundry thumps on the head from both his parents, for having the wickedness to tell a story. — "Tales," Ch. 7, "The Steam Excursion,"


Commentary:

"The Steam Excursion," the seventh of the stories in the "Tales" section of the collected edition of Sketches by Boz, was originally published in The Monthly Magazine in October 1834. The story is a young man's light-weight narrative — one can well imagine the agreeable "young-man-about-town" with rooms at Gray's Inn in Holborn, one of the old Inns of Court, as being an extension of twenty-two-year-old law clerk Charles Dickens himself, for he worked in the offices of Ellis and Blackmore at Gray's Inn in 1827, and was living in bachelor rooms at No. 13, Furnival's Inn, in December 1836. However, the second half of the story occurs not in Noakes's bachelor rooms, but on the General Steam Navigation Company vessel on the downward leg (during which the Misses Briggs give a performance on their guitars) and then returning from The Nore upriver — and encountering extremely rough weather in the sequel, The Steam Excursion — Part 2. In 1839, Cruikshank had provided two contrasting scenes, the first for the concert on the downward leg, on the rear deck of the steamer, the second in the cabin below decks as the storm hits on the return leg. In the concert scene, Cruikshank focuses on the guitar-playing Misses Briggs and the "facetious" Hardy, whom Barnard makes the subject of his first large-scale illustration "in a blue jacket and waistcoat, white trousers, silk stockings, and pumps — in full aquatic costume, with a straw hat on his head". Whereas Fred Barnard captures precise moments in the text (although the first is given in narrative rather than in dialogue), George Cruikshank has provided prolonged scenes — the Misses Briggs' giving their musical performance — "a new Spanish composition, for three voices and three guitars", and the guests' suffering from seasickness as the cabin is turned topsy-turvey by the rising wind, prior to their staggering on deck for air. Again, we see Barnard's tendency to particularize, to move in for the closeup, rather than pan back for a group scene. As with the other humorous vacation narrative, The Tuggses at Ramsgate, Fred Barnard depicts an earlier stage of the story, before the musical entertainment, the dinner, and the bout of seasickness occasioned by the sudden storm. As Paul Schlicke remarks,

Formally, the sketches and tales are organized in fundamentally different ways. The sketches generally lack plot and proceed wherever Boz's enquiring eye happens to alight. Their tone is genial, compassionate, and urbane. The tales, in contrast, are generally sardonic, moving boldly towards narrative climax, which often exposes vain or foolish characters to ridicule. . . . — The Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens.

Since the actual plot of the short story is slight, Dickens emphasizes the rivalries between the balloting factions in the organizing committee meetings, and between the Briggses and Tauntons, the antics of the peculiar Mr. Hardy, and the moments of physical humour, rather than the development of character, internal conflict, theme, and atmosphere that one would find in a modern short story. Barnard wisely focuses on two moments of vigorous activity; in the first, the comic man of the play, Mr. Hardy (who resembles Dickens's confidant and legal adviser John Forster, whom Dickens met on 25 December 1836). Barnard depicts the oversized elf in the ridiculous Victorian fashion for male children as anything but an innocent four-year-old "infant," as the subsequent thumping that his parents give him "for having the wickedness to tell a story" implies. Rather than behaving like an ogre, Hardy seems to be doing a pirate imitation — certainly Barnard vivifies a comic scene that Dickens neglected to develop.


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"One gentleman was observed suddenly from the table without the slightest ostensible, and dart up the stairs"

Fred Barnard

Text Illustrated:

The throbbing motion of the engine was but too perceptible. There was a large, substantial, cold boiled leg of mutton, at the bottom of the table, shaking like blancmange; a previously hearty sirloin of beef looked as if it had been suddenly seized with the palsy; and some tongues, which were placed on dishes rather too large for them, went through the most surprising evolutions; darting from side to side, and from end to end, like a fly in an inverted wine-glass. Then, the sweets shook and trembled, till it was quite impossible to help them, and people gave up the attempt in despair; and the pigeon-pies looked as if the birds, whose legs were stuck outside, were trying to get them in. The table vibrated and started like a feverish pulse, and the very legs were convulsed — everything was shaking and jarring. The beams in the roof of the cabin seemed as if they were put there for the sole purpose of giving people head-aches, and several elderly gentlemen became ill-tempered in consequence. As fast as the steward put the fire-irons up, they would fall down again; and the more the ladies and gentlemen tried to sit comfortably on their seats, the more the seats seemed to slide away from the ladies and gentlemen. Several ominous demands were made for small glasses of brandy; the countenances of the company gradually underwent most extraordinary changes; one gentleman was observed suddenly to rush from table without the slightest ostensible reason, and dart up the steps with incredible swiftness: thereby greatly damaging both himself and the steward, who happened to be coming down at the same moment. — "Tales," Ch. 7, "The Steam Excursion."

Commentary:

The party had by this time reached their destination, and put about on their return home. The wind, which had been with them the whole day, was now directly in their teeth; the weather had become gradually more and more overcast; and the sky, water, and shore were all of that dull, heavy, uniform lead colour. . . .

Since the actual plot of the short story is slight, Dickens emphasizes the rivalries between the balloting factions in the organizing committee meetings, and between the Briggses and Tauntons, the antics of the peculiar Mr. Hardy, and the moments physical humour, rather than the development of character, internal conflict, theme, and atmosphere that one would find in a modern short story. Barnard wisely focuses on two moments of vigorous physical humour. Whereas Cruikshank had employed group studies for the ill-fated pleasure voyage, the first static, the second kinetic, with his penchant for scenes involving just two characters in action, Fred Barnard is thoroughly enjoying the dynamic nature of the accident which involves just two figures in conflict, as the young "gentleman" in trousers and tailcoat butts the steward off his feet as he endeavours to hold onto four plates (although three of them are already air-born). To add to the sense of chaos, a soup tureen has been overturned, discharging its contents in a shower upon a female diner as the youth attempts to make his rapid exit upwards, undoubtedly under the influence of a queazy stomach and a desire to get to the railing as quickly as possible. To narrated moment is brief, but Barnard sees its comic potential, and replaces a dual portrait with volatile action for Cruikshank's rather dour group study of seasickness. The contrast involves the bearded, middle-aged steward's presumably being used to a little rough weather, but the inexperience townsman becoming violently ill.


Tristram Shandy | 4856 comments Mod
Oh dear, Kim! Whatever happened to Mr. Barnard before he did the first illustration? That little child looks like a dressed-up imp. An imp that has grown rather long in the tooth, at that.

My edition gave me the Cruikshank illustrations, which I like a lot, although I think that Phiz would have made more of the little details.


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Kim | 6388 comments Mod
I had to go back to the story to make sure the illustration really did go with the story, I'm not sure where it went, but I was sure it didn't go in our story. I was wrong.


Tristram Shandy | 4856 comments Mod
Yes, it is about Mr. Hardy's scaring the little child - whereas when you look at it, you'd think it could easily be the other way around.


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Kim | 6388 comments Mod
True. :-)


message 10: by Suki (new)

Suki St Charles (goodreadscomsuki_stcharles) | 29 comments The four Sketches we read after PP are the first time I have read any of the Sketches By Boz, and I enjoyed them all, although I do agree with Tristram that The Steam Excursion was my least favorite of the four. I hope that we will continue to read Sketches between longer readings; I know that there's nothing stopping me from just picking up the book and continuing, but it's a lot more fun to read along with everybody's comments, and Kim's pictures.


Tristram Shandy | 4856 comments Mod
I am definitely in favour of reading more of the Sketches and other short pieces in between our major group reads, Suki!


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Kim | 6388 comments Mod
Me too.


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