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Chill Out

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message 1: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Thorogood (tonythorogood) | 43 comments Mod
I thought I'd start with a joke from my book Murder in the Australian Back Blocks: What do you call a Donkey with 3 legs? A wonky. Now there you go I have broken rule number two. So a discussion do you think we live in a very serious time when even young people are charging around being ultra serious? Should we chill out more? This seems to me to be a very serious topic.


message 2: by Jason (new)

Jason (jasondenness) | 27 comments Mod
I don't think people are super serious these days, humour has just changed, my wife and kids spend ages laughing at video's on youtube. I blame cats for peoples lack of humour these days.


message 3: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Thorogood (tonythorogood) | 43 comments Mod
Yes its easy to say people were funnier in the old days but actually they were have you seen the way people used to dress? If I posted pictures of what I used to look like you would laugh your head off. Long hair, flared jeans, phsicodelic shirts actually I never wore a psychodelic shirt and I can't even spell it anyway. I guess there are two types of humour safe and cozy and satirical and confronting I guess my humour is a bit more confronting.


message 4: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Thorogood (tonythorogood) | 43 comments Mod
So a friend, by the name of Heather, who loved to laugh and a fan of my writing has just died. She will be missed.


message 5: by Jason (new)

Jason (jasondenness) | 27 comments Mod
That's a shame, RIP Heather.


message 6: by Mark (new)

Mark Allen | 1 comments I know I don't contribute to these discussions and probably don't again, but I'm sorry to hear this Anthony. I guess you choose to share it for a reason. Take care bud x


message 7: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Thorogood (tonythorogood) | 43 comments Mod
When one writes one puts a lot of oneself on line up front and if you make fans, I use the word fan but friends would be better, of your readers then because you have been so open and up front there follows a fairly close friendship even if you never meet. When that friend dies it is a great loss. This all sounds a bit involved but there you go. Anthony.


message 8: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Thorogood (tonythorogood) | 43 comments Mod
Just read Slaughter House Five - Kurt Vonnegut and quite enjoyed it. It’s a satire about the bombing of Dresden. The thing about Slaughter house Five is that Kurt Vonnegut was there during the bombing and it is very real. There is a brilliant bit about a war film of bombers that is run backwards and it is worth reading the book just for that. Probably one of the best anti-war books ever.


message 9: by Jason (new)

Jason (jasondenness) | 27 comments Mod
I've read that one, amazing book. Read a few of his now and all been good.


message 10: by Charlene Elliott (new)

Charlene Elliott | 2 comments Anthony wrote: "Just read Slaughter House Five - Kurt Vonnegut and quite enjoyed it. It’s a satire about the bombing of Dresden. The thing about Slaughter house Five is that Kurt Vonnegut was there during the bomb..." Yea, it's one of my favourite books!


message 11: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Thorogood (tonythorogood) | 43 comments Mod
Have you read any other of Kurt Vonnegut's books, Breakfast of Champions for instance?


message 12: by Jason (new)

Jason (jasondenness) | 27 comments Mod
Galápagos surprisingly good, really thought this one was gonna be a bit rubbish.

The Sirens of Titan read this one this year, funny satire, you could see America having a future like this.


message 13: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Thorogood (tonythorogood) | 43 comments Mod
Yes I read the Sirens of Titan years ago it's next on my list.


message 14: by Charlene Elliott (new)

Charlene Elliott | 2 comments I have a few on my Kindle but haven't got around to reading them. The last one I read was the Sirens of Titan, mostly because one of my favourite TV writers Dan Harmon is adapting it into a movie.


message 15: by Jason (new)

Jason (jasondenness) | 27 comments Mod
What did you think of Sirens Charlene?

And Dan Harmon is a genius, didn't know he was adapting it.


message 16: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Thorogood (tonythorogood) | 43 comments Mod
So I read a book and it wasn't funny at all and wasn't meant to be: All Quiet on the Western Front.

Basically it's about a whole lot of boys from the same school who are goaded by their teacher to go off to war. As we have come to understand it is hell out there and one really feels for them. The interesting thing for me is that they were Germans – the enemy but as one reads one doesn’t want them to get hurt. Being British and born when I was born the Germans were always the bad guys and I’ve been to Germany and liked the people but reading a war novel even an antiwar novel by a German is quite something. The simple style and the reality and the truthfulness of the writing certainly makes it well worth reading. So it is not a funny book but it is about the crazyness of mankind.


message 17: by Jay (new)

Jay Green | 1 comments Late to this conversation but want to express my worship of Kurt Vonnegut. Not everything he writes is great, but his dry humour and bemusement at humanity's self-inflicted misery is rarely replicated elsewhere. He remains nevertheless a humanist of the highest order whose rule no. 1 is: Be kind. This bears on the topic under discussion. So much of the humour today is shite because it is vindictive and lacking in empathy. Vonnegut shows that you can write humour that makes fun of people while nonetheless feeling sympathetic towards them.

I didn't know that All Quiet on the Western Front was supposed to be funny it I did enjoy it despite (spoiler alert!) all the protagonists dying. Maybe that was supposed to be the funny bit: the absurdity and stupidity of war. The Good Soldier Schweik is another one in this genre. It's told in quite a po-faced way but you're nevertheless in no doubt that everyone in it is ridiculous.


message 18: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Thorogood (tonythorogood) | 43 comments Mod
Yes Kurt V especially in Slaughter House Five is really great and All Quiet on the Western Front is not supposed to be a humourist book but it does have humour in it. I read All Quiet as I was reading a series of anti war stuff like Wilfred Owen's poems and Slaughter House Five, I'm writing a story on a bunch of guys who went off to war and shot people - non combatants and I was interested to see other peoples take on an anti war theme. War is a dreadful thing and when I was young I wrote an anti war play that was quite successful and my generation thought that we had it beat but now it just keeps coming back like a bad smell, unfortunately I think it is always going to be with us. Cheers Tony.


message 19: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Thorogood (tonythorogood) | 43 comments Mod
Been reading pulp fiction or at least some of the first books in pulp –

The Mask of Fu Manchu, went on a bit very episodic but each episode was ended with a zap, The Mask Of Zorro has an interesting central character but is a bit weak and now I'm reading Dr Savage: The Man of Bronze – the first American superhero book so far it seems a bit labored.


message 20: by Jason (new)

Jason (jasondenness) | 27 comments Mod
They are probably all a little weak, seeing as they were all rushed through to publishing. Usually got some brilliant covers though.


message 21: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Thorogood (tonythorogood) | 43 comments Mod
Yes brilliant covers very evocative - The Fu Manchu book (English) has a great villain who helped give birth to the James Bond villains and in the Doc Savage book you can see the birth of the American Super Heroes which is quite interesting. I read Zorro as I watched it on TV as a boy and in that book you can also see the birth of the Super Heroes. Another English book along those lines is Bulldog Drummond by Saper, he is a bit of a British hero type old school tie and a gentleman! I read the first Bulldog Drummond book then the second then tried the third - they are all the same story!!!


message 22: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Thorogood (tonythorogood) | 43 comments Mod
Some one compared Agatha Christies The Secret Adversary to my Jack Hamma books so I read it and yes I suppose there are similarities to my style – it is easy to read, has a good plot line, is sort of spy story come whodunit, is I think tongue in cheek, has a bit of romance and tries to have a twist at the end, I say tries because I knew who the villain was as soon as he appeared. I like to think my Jack Hamma books are a wee bit more sophisticated and a wee bit more serious with more realistic characters but that is for the reader to decide.

On another note I bought a book on Amazon called: Platonov A Country Scandal (Dover Thrift Edition) translated in 1960 by an American called Alex Szogyi. It is taken from the same play that the film Player Pinano was taken from. Platonov is such a long play that you can quarry it and come up with different works. Anyway this one is written as a farce which is good as it brings out the comedy in Chekhov. I enjoyed it but it is quite a different piece to Player Piano.


message 23: by Jason (new)

Jason (jasondenness) | 27 comments Mod
I always thought you looked similar to old Agatha.


message 24: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Thorogood (tonythorogood) | 43 comments Mod
In a dress you can't tell us apart!


message 25: by Jason (new)

Jason (jasondenness) | 27 comments Mod
Anthony wrote: "In a dress you can't tell us apart!"

She's the one with the beard, right?


message 26: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Thorogood (tonythorogood) | 43 comments Mod
That's right - she's also the one lying down looking like she's off with the angels.


message 27: by Anthony (last edited May 24, 2020 06:25PM) (new)

Anthony Thorogood (tonythorogood) | 43 comments Mod
A FRIEND OF MINE WROTE TO ME:

I'm glad you read the Secret Adversary and that you see some similarities to your books. What I thought reminded me of your books was things like a good beginning that gets you hooked. Then these 2 young daredevil people getting themselves mixed up in the most unlikely and very dangerous adventures. And the adventures reminded me of the Jack Hammer kind of adventures, and they just go from bad to worse (I mean bad to worse for the young people, not for the reader!!!). Lots of unpredicatable twists there. It seemed different from the other Agatha Christie books I've read, and better than them, but then I've only read about 5 of them. I think the fact that she didn't have either Miss Marple or Poirot in there and the two young protagonists had to carry the whole thing by themselves made it better.

I WROTE BACK:
You are right about the Secret Adversary a bit less predictable than the usual Agatha Christie whodunit. Getting back to my writing a good beginning is one of my hallmarks. I like my stories to keep moving, not to contain any waffle, to be humorous, have interesting characters, twists and turns and to be unpredictable. As well as all that I like them to have a deeper meaning without laboring the point. Oh yes I also like them to look at a situation from various angles. The Ten Musketeers looks at the idea of War Crimes from both sides.

That’s actually only some of the things I do to create a Jack Hamma story – underneath the easy read is a complex book and if people don’t realize it that is not a bad thing I won’t to write books that make people think a little bit, I don’t want them to be labored.

Cheers Antony


message 28: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Thorogood (tonythorogood) | 43 comments Mod
The Purple Pimpernel
I wrote a very funny series: Bigfoot Little Foot & West and some reviews commented that it wasn't funny, takes all kinds. So I wrote my Jack Hamma Action Adventures as serious books and reviews commented that they were very funny! Comedy is in the eye of the beholder. But now my latest Jack Hamma Action Adventure: The Purple Pimpernel is out cost $1 and on the 9th it's free, download it and have a read.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0B2R434N9

'A whodunit I didn't guess. I have been a "Jack Hamma" fan since the first book and have always looked forward to them coming out. This one had me guessing and I didn't foresee the ending at all. I would strongly suggest starting with first one "Shakespeare on the Roof" an read the series to get the progression in place. Enjoyed it and read it in one sitting.' Amazon Review.
Cheers Anthony E Thorogood.


message 29: by Jason (new)

Jason (jasondenness) | 27 comments Mod
That's a great review you've included there. :-)


message 30: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Thorogood (tonythorogood) | 43 comments Mod
Jason wrote: "That's a great review you've included there. :-)"

One of my oldest fans. Always wants to know when the next book is ready. Fans can be a bit daunting but I love them anyway.


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