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May/Jun 18 The Hate/Radium Girls > Child labour / teenage labor (Radium Girls)

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message 1: by Nonka (new)

Nonka | 11 comments I started the book and I just keep remembering my great-grandmother telling me as a kid how she started working in a factory when she was twelve (in 1920); her brother started earlier when he was 8 . . . For me it has always been a bit shocking a piece of family information, but nowadays I keep running into stories of elderly people remembering the enjoyment of work as a kid. (Or at least they were OK with it.) I suspect the enjoyment greatly depended on the type of the work.


message 2: by Pam (new)

Pam | 1091 comments Mod
I like to think of it as playing pretend while mimicking family. Playing house or with a baby doll. My little brother had a toy mower and would follow my dad around like a shadow when it was lawn day. (Would even mimic the swear words, too :P)

The kids from the Silent Generation didn't have much during that time. But by going to work they could mimic their parents.

And .. they could bring home some money to very happy parents.


message 3: by Nonka (new)

Nonka | 11 comments Pam wrote: "I like to think of it as playing pretend while mimicking family. Playing house or with a baby doll. My little brother had a toy mower and would follow my dad around like a shadow when it was lawn d..."
I enjoyed reading your reply. One learns something new every day. I googled "Silent Generation", I guess, the definition is also true for Central Europe where I live.


message 4: by Pam (last edited May 27, 2018 06:42AM) (new)

Pam | 1091 comments Mod
That's fair. My quote above makes it sound like all fun in games. When it's not. It's a serious topic that those in the US fought to create Labor laws that prevent this.

But while our country doesn't allow it, companies here sure don't seem to care going to other places where it's ok like in the before mentioned sweat shops (Nike, Nestle cough cough). And that's not touching on the sex trade.

Thank you for the correction Keith


message 5: by Nonka (new)

Nonka | 11 comments Meelie wrote: "If you’re interested in photography, Lewis Hine documented child labour in 1908, and because of his photos, this led to change the regulations to protect children.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/mag..."


Thank you! It made me think. As soon as photography became a "mobile" tool outside the studio, it turned into a medium to expose injustice, I guess, it really didn't start with television.


message 6: by Nonka (new)

Nonka | 11 comments Your comments are so impressive. I always thought there was a consideration, I mean that a girl is shorter and supposedly weaker, that's why my great-grandma had to start at 12, not 8.


message 7: by Ashley (new)

Ashley (itsashleychristine) Pam wrote: "That's fair. My quote above makes it sound like all fun in games. When it's not. It's a serious topic that those in the US fought to create Labor laws that prevent this.

But while our country doe..."


Unfortunately, it's very difficult for companies to ensure that their products are ethically sourced, as practically every piece of a Nike product comes from different places, different factories, different middlemen, especially without driving up the prices. Such is globalization.

This is an interesting article on that topic:
https://highline.huffingtonpost.com/a...


message 8: by Nadine (new)

Nadine ♥ (misshappyreading) | 21 comments Meelie wrote: "If you’re interested in photography, Lewis Hine documented child labour in 1908, and because of his photos, this led to change the regulations to protect children.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/mag..."


Thank you so much for sharing this. I must admit I didn't know about this (or in fact radium girls) before. Sadly in central Europe we do not learn a lot about historical facts around the world apart from the WWs.


message 9: by Nonka (new)

Nonka | 11 comments Karina wrote: "Children’s labour is common in my country, México. It’s pretty sad because the poorest people (generally with indigenous background) are obligated to abandon school in order to gain some money and ..."

It's not a true childhood . . .


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