Love Inspired Historicals discussion

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Monthly Author Q&A > 2018 June Q & A

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message 1: by Melinda (new)

Melinda M (researcher707) | 2554 comments Just want to let you all know that we will be having a Q & A for June. It will be June 4 thru June 9. I know here in the US there is a 3 day weekend coming up and the start of vacation season. In other places, there are always things going on so I wanted to let you know the dates and the week. We have authors coming. I know that June 9th is a Saturday but it worked better for an author. a couple of the authirs will do giveaways. We will find out what they plan to do from here. So do not be sad Sad that it is the last month for Love Inspired Historicals, let's enjoy this and know that we plan to get together every month. I will list the authors as we get closer.

Make sure to mark June 4- June 9 on your calendar. I look forward to seeing you then.


message 2: by Jolene (new)

Jolene | 30 comments See you then! :)


message 3: by Paula (new)

Paula Shreckhise | 74 comments I’ll be checking in!


message 4: by Dorothy (new)

Dorothy Clark | 1393 comments Thanks, Melinda. I'll be here!


message 5: by Melinda (last edited Jun 02, 2018 09:55PM) (new)

Melinda M (researcher707) | 2554 comments I am putting up the schedule for the June Q & A which starts on Monday ,June 4 thru Sat. June 9.
The schedule is as follows:
Monday, June 4 Mollie Campbell
Orphan Train Sweetheart by Mollie Campbell


Tuesday, June 5- Shannon Farrington
Handpicked Family by Shannon Farrington

Wednesday, June 6 Regina Scott
Never Borrow a Baronet by Regina Scott

The June Bride Conspiracy (The Spy Matchmaker #2) by Regina Scott

Never Doubt a Duke (Fortune's Brides #1) by Regina Scott


Thursday, June 7- Linda Ford

Reluctant Bride (Dakota Brides Book 4) by Linda Ford


Three Brides for Three Cowboys Complete Collection The Cowboy Tutor\The Cowboy Father\The Cowboy Comes Home by Linda Ford

I was unable to get in touch with Linda Ford but she has written many stories since the last time she was at a Q & A. Have you read any?

Friday, June 8 -Stacy Henrie
A Cowboy of Convenience by Stacy Henrie
Stacy Henrie could not be with us this week so we will discuss her new books and her past books.

Saturday, June 9 Karen Kirst
Romancing the Runaway Bride by Karen Kirst


message 6: by Melinda (new)

Melinda M (researcher707) | 2554 comments Hope you all will stop by and discuss the books with the authors and each other. See you on Monday, June 4.


message 7: by Valri (new)

Valri Western | 964 comments Sounds great! I love that we are continuing!!!


message 8: by Becky (new)

Becky Smith | 679 comments Dorothy wrote: "Thanks, Melinda. I'll be here!"

Dorothy, I am halfway through your book from last month, and it is so much fun to read! I wish I didn't have to put it down!


message 9: by Melinda (last edited Jun 03, 2018 10:06PM) (new)

Melinda M (researcher707) | 2554 comments I would like to welcome, Mollie Campbell to the June Q & A.

Here is a little information about Mollie.
Mollie Campbell has always had stories in her head but never imagined that writing would turn out to be the perfect fit for her. She loves antiques and watching all the superhero shows and movies she can get her hands on.
A life-long Midwestern girl, Mollie lives in central Indiana, where her family has roots back to the 1860s. She is so thankful she gets to spend her days putting together words for people to read and hanging out with her husband, two kids, and a rather enthusiastic beagle.

Her release this month Orphan Train Sweetheart Orphan Train Sweetheart by Mollie Campbell
It is available in paperback and e-book editions.

This is the blurb for the book, Orphan Train Sweetheart:

Finding a Frontier Family

Spring Hill is the orphan train’s last stop—a final chance for Simon McKay to find homes for his young charges. When his fellow placing agent quits, Simon enlists help from the frontier town’s pretty schoolteacher. Cecilia Holbrook is as intriguing as she is independent, yet Simon’s devotion to his mission will soon call him back to New York.

Long overshadowed by her flirtatious sister, Cecilia is done with waiting for a man to choose her. She’s already fighting the school board to keep her position. Now she’s struggling not to lose her heart to Simon. Could their shared concern for the children show them how to follow a new dream, together?


message 10: by Melinda (new)

Melinda M (researcher707) | 2554 comments Mollie,
Thank you for joining us. What made you decide to write ?
Did you have to do a lot of researcher for this books?
What time period do you like to read about ?
If it is different than what you write in, why and what are the differences that you like?

How did the idea for Orphan train Sweetheart story form?


message 11: by Ausjenny (new)

Ausjenny | 4955 comments Wow Cecilia has so much to contend with. I didn't have a flirtatious sister but did live in the shadow of a brother who was great at any sport he played and also an academic and in the popular group. I was the not so good sport player and not so good at school and often over looked or compared to him with teachers who had had him often expecting more than I was able to do.
But to also have to deal with the school board and now the children who I can see her losing her heart to and now Simon who if she does fall for she knows hes going back to New York she has so much to contend with.
This makes the book even more interesting. Did you enjoy writing about the children in the book?


message 12: by Melinda (last edited Jun 04, 2018 05:54AM) (new)

Melinda M (researcher707) | 2554 comments Ausjenny,
Glad that you could pop in. Love your question.


message 13: by Valri (new)

Valri Western | 964 comments Sounds like an interesting book! Love the premise!


message 14: by Shannon (new)

Shannon Farrington Hi Mollie! Congratulations on your newest release! It sounds like a wonderful story!


message 15: by Mollie (new)

Mollie Campbell (molliecampbell) | 29 comments Hi, everyone! I'm thrilled to be with you today. Looking forward to a great discussion!


message 16: by Mollie (new)

Mollie Campbell (molliecampbell) | 29 comments Ausjenny, I LOVE writing about kids! I have two young kids of my own, so that's kind of the mindset I live in all the time :)


message 17: by Mollie (new)

Mollie Campbell (molliecampbell) | 29 comments I have a question for all of you. Since writing this book, I've had friends mention they know someone who traveled on the orphan train. Do any of you have a connection to an orphan train rider?


message 18: by Melinda (new)

Melinda M (researcher707) | 2554 comments I do not know of any connection to the orphan train. Until recently , I did not realize how many people that I know are adopted,


message 19: by Melinda (new)

Melinda M (researcher707) | 2554 comments Mollie,
How do you find time to write with young children? Do you plot your stories?


message 20: by Andrea (new)

Andrea | 558 comments Hi Mollie! Congratulations on your book! I do not have connections to an orphan train that I'm aware of. I have connections to Indiana though. I was born and raised in and around Bloomington. I've been away for nearly 35 years and miss it so very much.
With the LIH line closing 😥 what are your future plans?
I like the descriptions of your books listed on Amazon.


message 21: by Mollie (new)

Mollie Campbell (molliecampbell) | 29 comments Melinda, here are answers to your questions.

What made you decide to write ? I've always loved writing but worried I wasn't creative enough for fiction! One of the Love Inspired contests gave me the courage to try it and I'm so thankful that now I get to share all the stories in my head :)

Did you have to do a lot of researcher for this books? Yes! I read a lot of personal accounts of orphan train riders for this story. I also had to do research on how schools worked in the 1860s.

What time period do you like to read about ? I love the end of the Victorian era, around 1900. So elegant and the world was changing quickly, especially for women.

If it is different than what you write in, why and what are the differences that you like? It is different from my two Love Inspired Historical books. I like learning about all different time periods, so writing in a different one from what I usually read was exciting!

How did the idea for Orphan train Sweetheart story form? I've had a fascination with the orphan train for a long time, so most of the story formed when I tried to figure out if that could be what brought my hero to town. Sure enough, the historical timing was right!


message 22: by Mollie (new)

Mollie Campbell (molliecampbell) | 29 comments Oh, and also for Melinda, I tend to write in small chucks naturally, so I've found it works well for me to write when my kids are around. I try to utilize the times when they're most occupied, like during cartoons at breakfast or in the afternoon when they have quiet reading time.

I do plot my stories. There are only two things I never end up plotting: the kissing scenes and the very end, when they profess their love. For some reason, those have to come to me when I get to that point in the writing!


message 23: by Mollie (new)

Mollie Campbell (molliecampbell) | 29 comments Hi Andrea! I always love meeting another Hoosier :)

I'm not sure at the moment where my writing will go next. I have worked up an idea for a contemporary Love Inspired story that I hope to see published at some point, but at the same time, I don't think I can give up historical romance. I'm also working on a new historical story and I hope to find a home with another publisher for that someday!


message 24: by Paula (new)

Paula Shreckhise | 74 comments I will miss the historicals. My favorite genre!


message 25: by Andrea (new)

Andrea | 558 comments Mollie wrote: "Hi Andrea! I always love meeting another Hoosier :)

I'm not sure at the moment where my writing will go next. I have worked up an idea for a contemporary Love Inspired story that I hope to see pub..."

Mollie, I'm not associated with them at all but Barbour Publishing does a lot of historical novella collections. I think you could fit in with them nicely.


message 26: by Melinda (new)

Melinda M (researcher707) | 2554 comments Mollie,
Have you always liked history? Do you have a connect to the Orphan train besides writing about it?


message 27: by Melinda (new)

Melinda M (researcher707) | 2554 comments Paula wrote: "I will miss the historicals. My favorite genre!"

Paula,
Most of the authors are still writing and publishing . Pick your authors and check them out on Amazon and the web. Most of the authors have either a website or a Facebook page.


message 28: by Becky (new)

Becky Smith | 679 comments Mollie wrote: "I have a question for all of you. Since writing this book, I've had friends mention they know someone who traveled on the orphan train. Do any of you have a connection to an orphan train rider?"
No connection that I know of, but my great grandfather and 3 of his siblings lost their father in Sweden before they started for America. On the voyage over here, their mother who was still in Sweden died. The youngest on the voyage was 12, and the oldest sister was 20. I can't imagine a new country and no living parents! The orphan trains are interesting but a little sad to think about.


message 29: by Becky (new)

Becky Smith | 679 comments Mollie wrote: "Ausjenny, I LOVE writing about kids! I have two young kids of my own, so that's kind of the mindset I live in all the time :)"
Do you work any true-life experiences of your children into your book children?


message 30: by Pamela (new)

Pamela (pamela3265) | 4 comments I haven't read "Orphan Train Sweetheart" yet, but I enjoyed your previous book "Taking on Twins. I hope you are able to continue writing and publishing. I'll be watching for more.


message 31: by Melinda (new)

Melinda M (researcher707) | 2554 comments Mollie,
What has been different between writing your historical stories and getting an ide to form into a story for contemporary story?


message 32: by Mollie (new)

Mollie Campbell (molliecampbell) | 29 comments Andrea, I'd love to write for Barbour someday :) I think writing shorter formats like a novella is a fun challenge!

Melinda, I have always loved history. I don't know if it was because my mom was always reading historical novels or because my parents really value our family history, but it's been my passion forever. In fact, I worked at a museum after college and almost went to get a master's degree in history!

Becky, how neat to know that story about your family. The fact that the orphan train had to exist is sad to me, too. Especially because many of the children still had families, they just couldn't or wouldn't take care of the kids. But having that alternative to living on the street had to have been a blessing to many of them at the time.

And yes, I have put real things my kids did into my books! Especially my first one, Taking on Twins. The twins were the same age that my daughter was at the time and I used several things she did in the book. One of the contemporary ideas I'm working on also features a little boy who has some cute personality quirks that my son has :)


message 33: by Mollie (new)

Mollie Campbell (molliecampbell) | 29 comments Melinda wrote: "Mollie,
What has been different between writing your historical stories and getting an ide to form into a story for contemporary story?"


The biggest thing I've found is that research is sometimes easier for a historical story! Historical details are already well-documented and pretty easy to find online or in books the library would have. Figuring out what it's really like to work in a modern job I've never had or live in a place I've never been to is harder! I spend more time worrying over getting those little details right so I don't jerk readers out of the story with something unrealistic.


message 34: by Mollie (new)

Mollie Campbell (molliecampbell) | 29 comments Pamela wrote: "I haven't read "Orphan Train Sweetheart" yet, but I enjoyed your previous book "Taking on Twins. I hope you are able to continue writing and publishing. I'll be watching for more."

Thank you, Pamela! It means a lot to an author to hear that!


message 35: by Mollie (new)

Mollie Campbell (molliecampbell) | 29 comments I'll be back in through the evening, but I wanted to add that I have a copy of Orphan Train Sweetheart to give away to one of the commenters.

If you've been lurking, let us know you're here so I can include you in the giveaway!


message 36: by Ausjenny (new)

Ausjenny | 4955 comments I don't know of any who went on an orphan train but then I am an Aussie. I do know of a few that thankfully didn't go on the orphan trip from Liverpool to Australia as many of these children were then abused.
I know of quite a few people who are adopted including my brother and two cousins. A couple of friends also have adopted children from overseas.


message 37: by Melinda (last edited Jun 04, 2018 03:34PM) (new)

Melinda M (researcher707) | 2554 comments Mollie,
I already ordered the book so do not include me in the giveaway.

I had not thought about the aspect of not having material to research on the now things.

Was there a part of either book that is your favorite part or that made you laugh?


Do you have a newsletter?
I know you have a website and a Facebook page.
Website is https://www.molliecampbell.com

Mollie's Facebook page is
https://www.facebook.com/molliecampbe...


message 38: by Melinda (new)

Melinda M (researcher707) | 2554 comments Mollie,
When you did your research on the Orphan train did you find many happy endings ? IS there a story that stick with you?


message 39: by Mollie (new)

Mollie Campbell (molliecampbell) | 29 comments Ausjenny wrote: "I don't know of any who went on an orphan train but then I am an Aussie. I do know of a few that thankfully didn't go on the orphan trip from Liverpool to Australia as many of these children were t..."

I love hearing how adoption has impacted families in great ways! It always seems to sneak into my books, too :)


message 40: by Mollie (new)

Mollie Campbell (molliecampbell) | 29 comments I don't have a newsletter at the moment, but I hope to get that up and running soon. If you'd be interested, check my Facebook page or website, as Melinda posted above, or follow me on Twitter (@MollieACampbell) to keep updated.

As for my favorite part or one that made me laugh, I love the epilogue of Orphan Train Sweetheart. I won't give it away, but the hero is quite surprised by the previously unsure heroine and I had so much fun writing that!


message 41: by Mollie (new)

Mollie Campbell (molliecampbell) | 29 comments Melinda wrote: "Mollie,
When you did your research on the Orphan train did you find many happy endings ? IS there a story that stick with you?"


For all the stories of sad situations, there are as many where children found a loving home and grew up happy. Some even found their birth parents later on, as the Children's Aid Society tried to keep the best records they could. There were several stories that stuck with me and I used those as inspiration for scenes in the book.

One of those is the oldest orphan train girl in the story. I have no idea if she ended up in a good home or not, but the real-life girl I read about grew attached to the baby in her group and wanted to be placed out in the same home. So I had my oldest girl and the baby end up on neighboring farms, as a nod to the real girl's dreams.


message 42: by Dorothy (new)

Dorothy Clark | 1393 comments Becky wrote: "Dorothy wrote: "Thanks, Melinda. I'll be here!"

Dorothy, I am halfway through your book from last month, and it is so much fun to read! I wish I didn't have to put it down!"


Thanks, Becky. I'm glad you're enjoying the book. I had fun writing that Stand-In Bride Series.


message 43: by Mollie (new)

Mollie Campbell (molliecampbell) | 29 comments I'm off for the night, but I'll check back in the morning to answer any last questions and announce the giveaway winner.

Thanks for chatting with me today, I really enjoyed hearing from all of you!


message 44: by Melinda (new)

Melinda M (researcher707) | 2554 comments Thanks for coming Mollie.


message 45: by Dorothy (new)

Dorothy Clark | 1393 comments Hi Mollie. I'm sorry I'm so late getting here. It was one of those days!

I don't know anyone connected to the orphan trains personally. How scary an experience that would have been. Especially for a timid child. Did you find many letters, etc. from the real orphans while doing your research?


message 46: by Melinda (new)

Melinda M (researcher707) | 2554 comments Mollie will check in and answer any unanswered question in the morning.


message 47: by Melinda (last edited Jun 04, 2018 09:39PM) (new)

Melinda M (researcher707) | 2554 comments Tuesday, June 5 has Shannon Farrington visiting us.
Welcome , Shannon!

Here is a little background on Shannon.

Shannon Farrington and her husband have been married for nearly 25 years, have two children, and are active members in both their church and community.

When she isn't researching or writing, you can find Shannon visiting national parks and historical sites or at home herding her small flock of chickens through the backyard. She and her family live in Maryland. You can follow her on twittter @_SFarrington

Her release this month is Handpicked Family. Handpicked Family by Shannon Farrington

The Synopsis follows.

Father by Design

After the Civil War, newspaper editor Peter Carpenter insists he’ll never marry or raise children in such a troubling world. His commitment to bachelorhood only intensifies as he and his lovely assistant, Trudy Martin, search the ravaged Shenandoah Valley for his missing widowed sister-in-law and her baby.

Ever the optimist, Trudy refuses to embrace Peter’s bleak outlook. Unfortunately, that doesn’t diminish her deep feelings for him—feelings she knows he’ll never reciprocate. But when Peter and Trudy become responsible for two war orphans, will Peter still keep his heart closed to his newfound family…or can he find hope in fatherhood?


message 48: by Melinda (new)

Melinda M (researcher707) | 2554 comments Shannon,
What inspired you to become a writer? Why have you picked the Civil War Era for your stories? While doing you research what surprised you the most?


message 49: by Ausjenny (new)

Ausjenny | 4955 comments this sounds interesting. I visited the Shenandoah valley area when I visited America and did a Historical highlights trip. The whole area is so beautiful but I bet after the civil war would have needed a lot of time to regenerate and become beautiful again.
I too love visiting the historical landmarks. I loved my tour.


message 50: by Shannon (new)

Shannon Farrington Good morning, ladies! It is great to be with y'all again! Hope each of you is doing well.

It is a beautiful, sunny morning here on the east coast. Hope the weather is good where you are!

Jenny, I'm glad you got to visit the Shenandoah valley. It is such a beautiful place any time of year. Sounds like you had a fun time.

To answer your questions, Melinda.... I'm not sure any one event inspired me to be a writer. I think maybe God just put it there from the beginning. I have always been a "scribbler." I can remember writing a fictionalized account of my dad when I was in the second grade. I said he fought pirates when he was in the Navy. He did serve in the navy but there were no pirates. :) I would also write new endings to TV shows if they didn't turn out the way I wanted. When I got into high school I wrote poetry and short stories for the school literary magazine.

The civil war has always interested me because it was such a vast, consuming event in our history. It was such a dark time but there are also stories of light-- people who showed incredible mercy to their enemies, or selflessly gave their life for others. When I do research I always wonder, how did people come to make the choices they did? How did their faith, or lack there of, influence their decisions? What can we learn from that process today?

When writing Handpicked Family I tried to show two contrasting personalities. Trudy has known grief and privations but at heart, she remains optimistic. She holds onto her faith, believing God is still in control, that the future will be better than the past.

Peter, on the other hand, is so disturbed by the war, the condition of humanity, that he thinks God no longer concerns himself with the everyday affairs of men and women. It takes a crisis Trudy soon faces and two little children (with plenty of unexpected twists) to change his mind and renew his faith.


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