The Three Musketeers (The D'Artagnan Romances, #1) The Three Musketeers discussion


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d'Artagnan sells horse... against father's wishes???

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message 1: by [deleted user] (last edited May 21, 2018 07:05PM) (new)

Have just started reading, just finished chap. 1 so perhaps this is made clear later, if so no please ignore my question, but if not made clear in story later, am curious as to anyone's take on how it is so easy for d'Artagnan to sell the yellow pony his father gave him as soon as he reaches Paris. The father expressly asked him to treat it like family (since it was) and never sell it. Not sure if d'Artagnan or even Dumas, master of irony and tragicomic situations, is treating the father's unrealistic expectations as ridiculously over sentimental which would, along with the pony's ridiculous appearance, justify d'Artagnan selling it. However it is earlier stated that his father's parting words, if not the pony, were priceless to d'Artagnan. It would seem d'Artagnan would have a twinge of guilt?


Gary d'Artagnan sees the pony as an object. His father sees the pony as a member of the family.


message 3: by julie (last edited Jul 26, 2018 09:27PM) (new) - added it

julie Rich wrote: "Have just started reading, just finished chap. 1 so perhaps this is made clear later, if so no please ignore my question, but if not made clear in story later, am curious as to anyone's take on how..." I'm so glad I found your comment as I had the same thought: was Dumas aiming for irony? Was it an oversight on his part? Given that his father's words were priceless to d'Artagnan, shouldn't he at least have hesitated in selling the pony? My conclusion is that the episode serves to reveal d'Artagnan's character. (It's all the more interesting to consider his selling the pony in light of d'Artagnan's later affection for the gift of the Queen's diamond ring. He refuses to sell the ring; the pony, he parts with easily.)


message 4: by [deleted user] (last edited Aug 01, 2018 09:17AM) (new)

Thank you so much Gary and Julie for the feedback! I am glad at least I did not miss any obvious explanation, and thanks Julie for putting the paradox into words much better than I could! And you are right, the ring DOES add even more twist to his horse sale, very good point! I think then, as you say, it must be Dumas' way of showing d'Artagnan's character without highlighting it. Perhaps his father's words were priceless only where they validated his pre-existing desire to achieve honor and adventure in the King's (or Queen's) service. Happy reading to you both and thanks again.


Gary I plan to read more Dumas books. The next one is Monte Cristo book.


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