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Archived > June 2018 Book Nominations

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message 1: by La Tonya (last edited May 21, 2018 03:36PM) (new)

La Tonya  Jordan | 725 comments Mod
It is time to choose our June 2018 read! Let us read a classic that has to do with the mountains as a theme. I look forward to seeing the nominations.

Rules
1. One book per person
2. Poll will be set up when we reach 6 valid nominations
3. Book should follow the theme
4. Book should be considered a classic
5. Try to explain why you are choosing the book (optional)

Please check against the list of books the group has already read:
https://www.goodreads.com/group/books...


message 2: by JazzyJake (new)

JazzyJake | 26 comments The Snow Leopard - Peter Mattheissen


message 3: by Hannah (new)

Hannah | 72 comments The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann

The mountain isn’t necessarily the subject of the book, but I think the separation of the setting from the war plays a significant role in the story itself.


message 4: by La Tonya (new)

La Tonya  Jordan | 725 comments Mod
JazzyJake wrote: "The Snow Leopard - Peter Mattheissen"

JazzyJake wrote: "The Snow Leopard - Peter Mattheissen"

La Tonya wrote: "It is time to choose our June 2018 read! Let us read a classic that has to do with the mountains as a theme. I look forward to seeing the nominations.

Rules
1. One book per person
2. Poll will b..."


The Snow Leopard by Peter Mattheissen was published in 1978, To be considered a classic for this group, the book needs to be at least 50 years old. The Snow Leopard is disqualified.


message 5: by La Tonya (new)

La Tonya  Jordan | 725 comments Mod
Heidi by Johanna Spyri Heidi


message 6: by Daphne (new)

Daphne Walker | 2 comments Well Heidi was the first book I thought of as well, but maybe Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. Is this too modern/new?


message 7: by David (new)

David Johannesen (davidtaylorjohannesen) | 15 comments Magic Mountain in its literary range is larger than any mountain!


message 8: by JazzyJake (new)

JazzyJake | 26 comments Trying again: Snow Country by Yasunari Kawabata


message 9: by Matt (new)

Matt (mmullerm) I nominate The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

This book fits the theme of mountains perfectly.


message 10: by Lia (new)

Lia I nominate Prometheus Bound (probably) by Aeschylus.

You have no doubt heard, seen, and read many representations of this myth — in paintings, in sculptures, in comics, in movies, in modern adaptations, in poems and novels. Prometheus is carried by “force” and “violence” — two representatives of Zeus — to a mountain, to be chained by Hephaestus, for the crime of giving fire to men. But what was the play originally about? Read to find out!


message 11: by La Tonya (new)

La Tonya  Jordan | 725 comments Mod
Leslie wrote: "Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier. I'm choosing this because it's been on my To Read list for awhile. I'm in NC and love history and it was a beautiful movie. It's always ..."

Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier was published in 1997, To be considered a classic for this group, the book needs to be at least 50 years old. Cold Mountain is disqualified.

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message 12: by Leslie (last edited May 22, 2018 06:32AM) (new)

Leslie | 49 comments Trying again. How about Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin which is definitely a classic, not unbearably long, and probably on summer reading lists for families reading together.


message 13: by La Tonya (new)

La Tonya  Jordan | 725 comments Mod
Leslie wrote: "Trying again. How about Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin which is definitely a classic, not unbearably long, and probably on summer reading lists for families..."

Perfect !!!! Thank You !!!!


message 14: by Susan (new)

Susan (superbookfreak) | 8 comments what about Inkheart?


message 15: by Maryam (last edited May 22, 2018 10:53AM) (new)


message 16: by La Tonya (new)

La Tonya  Jordan | 725 comments Mod
Susan wrote: "what about Inkheart?"

We selected the first six valid nominations. Below is the poll to vote:
https://www.goodreads.com/poll/show/1...


message 17: by La Tonya (new)

La Tonya  Jordan | 725 comments Mod
Susan wrote: "what about Inkheart?"

We selected the first six valid nominations. Below is the poll to vote:
https://www.goodreads.com/poll/show/1...


message 18: by David (new)

David Johannesen (davidtaylorjohannesen) | 15 comments “Silas Marner” by George Eliot, author of Middlemarch: one of the most heroic novels of the 19th century!


message 19: by La Tonya (new)

La Tonya  Jordan | 725 comments Mod
David wrote: "“Silas Marner” by George Eliot, author of Middlemarch: one of the most heroic novels of the 19th century!"

The group has read this book. It is disquailifed.


message 20: by Carsie (new)

Carsie (launeybookshop) | 1 comments Hi everyone,
I'd like to nominate Sabrina Fair by Samuel A Taylor.
I've seen both of the Sabrina movies based on it, which were great. And we all know the book is always better that the movie...


message 21: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Hale (kahale) | 36 comments I would like to nominate Silent Spring by Rachel Carson Silent Spring. Even though it is more modern than many you have read before it is a classic about the harm being done to our environment.


message 22: by Eileen (new)

Eileen Secrest | 3 comments Great choice!


message 23: by Eileen (new)

Eileen Secrest | 3 comments Great choice!


message 24: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 49 comments The Story of San Michele by Axel Munthe The Story of San Michele by Axel Munthe, first published 1929, 368 pages.

The Story of San Michele (a villa built on the ruins of a Roman Emperor's villa in Capri) is a series of overlapping vignettes, roughly but not entirely in chronological order. It contains reminiscences of many periods of the author's life. He associated with a number of celebrities of his times, including Jean-Martin Charcot, Louis Pasteur, Henry James, and Guy de Maupassant, all of whom figure in the book. He also associated with the very poorest of people, including Italian immigrants in Paris and plague victims in Naples, as well as rural people such as the residents of Capri, and the Nordic Lapplanders. He was an unabashed animal lover, and animals figure prominently in several stories, perhaps most notably his alcoholic pet baboon, Billy.


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