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The Lounge: Chat. Relax. Unwind. > Fishing, hunting, gathering

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message 1: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 16090 comments As much as we are seemingly advanced with all those gadgets, hyper-sonic travel, space exploration, nukes and all, the ancient activities are still kinda popular, maybe not for survival (although who knows), but at least for recreation and pleasure. If we leave aside the oldest profession for a sec, because it's not about it, do you like fishing, hunting or gathering nature's produce? Are any of these available in your location?


message 2: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 11811 comments For abut 25 years I took a week off each year to go catch whitebait on the West Coast of the Sth Island, using the right to a "position" I sort of inherited from my father. I gave up when my hip went bad, and now i have lost it because it has silted up due to a change in the river. I enjoyed those times, although it tended to be hard work, and at ties frustrating when the weather was unkind.


message 3: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 6184 comments All are available in my location, but growing things and fishing are my favorites. Have to release the fish, though. Otherwise, I'd have to clean them, which is not my thing.


message 4: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 16090 comments More members practicing any/all of these activities?


message 5: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments I love fishing, however both my husband and I have been incredibly spoilt for normal fishing, due to having holidayed and fished regularly on the northwest coast of WA on Ningaloo station. Our fishing experiences in NSW have been very disappointing.

This is a video made by my cousin's youngest. In the place that spoiled us for normal fishing forever. Coral trout....mmmmmmmm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Ly3y...

And we have marvellous friends who live on Christmas island who routinely post images of their latest (ginormous) catches.


message 6: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 16090 comments Leonie wrote: "This is a video made by my cousin's youngest. In the place that spoiled us for normal fishing forever. Coral trout....mmmmmmmm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Ly3y......"


Mama mia, that's some fabulous catch!
Reminded me a diving tour off Cairns' shores and the amazing underwater fauna of the GBR


message 7: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments One of the truly most delicious fish :)


message 8: by J. (new)

J. Gowin | 4586 comments Leonie wrote: "I love fishing, however both my husband and I have been incredibly spoilt for normal fishing, due to having holidayed and fished regularly on the northwest coast of WA on Ningaloo station. Our fish..."

That looks like fun.


message 9: by J. (new)

J. Gowin | 4586 comments This time of year, the hot days tend to make night fishing more tempting. An hour or two bowfishing for carp, to use as bait, and then a long night of cold beer and fighting 20-50 pound catfish.

I also hunt. The freezer full of venison, boar, duck, goose, chukar, and rabbit is nice. It has allowed me to weather tough times and help out friends and relatives. However, the reason I do it is because during that time in the field modernity dies away, and the truest and oldest part of me breathes free. You learn a lot about yourself when all that exists is you, nature, and your prey.


message 10: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 6184 comments Sounds wonderful and interesting, J. Do you do the Native American thing of thanking your prey? What's chukar? And does rabbit taste like chicken? :-)


message 11: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 16090 comments J. wrote: "....The freezer full of venison, boar, duck, goose, chukar, and rabbit is nice. It has allowed me to weather tough times and help out friends and relatives. However, the reason I do it is because during that time in the field modernity dies away, and the truest and oldest part of me breathes free. You learn a lot about yourself when all that exists is you, nature, and your prey..."

Impressive! And I dig the experience that many of us lack these days. I wouldn't want to shoot an animal, but I've no objection if anyone else does, except for poachers


message 12: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 16090 comments Scout wrote: "... And does rabbit taste like chicken? :-)"

Not addressed to me, I know, but it's just a lot of stuff reminds chicken, including frogs or crocodile. Wonder if a roasted bat is somewhat different :)


message 13: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 11811 comments I am happy enough to shoot an animal for a good purpose, e.g. for food or pest eradication, but I loathe the idea of killing for sport, or poaching, or for Chinese "medicine".


message 14: by J. (new)

J. Gowin | 4586 comments Scout wrote: "Sounds wonderful and interesting, J. Do you do the Native American thing of thanking your prey? What's chukar? And does rabbit taste like chicken? :-)"

Hi Scout,

I've been thankful, and I've said, "thank you." But I've never really made a ritual out of it. The hard work begins when the animal is down. At the least it needs to be field dressed as quickly as possible. Then you need to get it home before it rots. Once you get it home, you need to skin, butcher, pack, and freeze or salt and smoke it. Anyone who dismisses a rifle hunt for being "too easy" either has no clue what a hunt actually involves, or has only ever gone on guided hunts where the guides did the work.

Chukar are a type of partridge that is native to central Asia, but which has been introduced around the world. This video does a pretty good job explaining them:

https://youtu.be/tyvSwCMt458

Rabbit can be fairly mild, and it is well suited to a lot of the same preparations as chicken. Personally, I think it is closer in flavor to lamb than chicken, but different people will call it how they feel. One of my favorite recipes is rabbit in mustard sauce:

https://youtu.be/U2keZyMtCoY


message 15: by J. (new)

J. Gowin | 4586 comments Ian wrote: "I am happy enough to shoot an animal for a good purpose, e.g. for food or pest eradication, but I loathe the idea of killing for sport, or poaching, or for Chinese "medicine"."

In the US most Hunter's follow a fair chase ethos, and they either eat their prey or donate it to food kitchens. I feel that it is apropos to point out that while many disdain sport hunters, well managed hunting is critical to the long term survival of wildlife which has had its predators eradicated and its habitat bulldozed. Also hunting funds habitat restoration and maintenance.


message 16: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 11811 comments Hunting to manage ecosystems is fine as long as the entire ecology is fully understood, but often it isn't. I saw one area in Africa where an area was managed to keep out elephants and all that happened was it became choked with thorn bush, which effectively kept everything of size out.


message 17: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 6184 comments Thanks for your reply, J. For some species, like deer, hunting is the only way to manage populations. Otherwise they would starve from overpopulation due to a lack of natural predators and reduced habitat.


message 18: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) | 3079 comments Scout wrote: "Thanks for your reply, J. For some species, like deer, hunting is the only way to manage populations. Otherwise they would starve from overpopulation due to a lack of natural predators and reduced ..."

Could always get the natural predators back. Europe is trying to increase Wolf population and reintroduce some birds of prey


message 19: by J. (last edited Jun 30, 2020 03:18PM) (new)

J. Gowin | 4586 comments There have been reintroduction programs in the US. Their success is limited by the amount of land that the wolves/grizzlies/pumas can use without interacting with humans. This can be seen in the Yellowstone wolves. Inside of the park, the wolves have been incredibly successful, and have had fascinating impacts on their habitat. But whenever they leave the park they often prey on livestock, and get killed.

It's a truism that the biggest threat to wildlife is not a hunter's gun, but rather a developer's bulldozer, farmer's plow, and rancher's fence.


message 20: by G.R. (new)

G.R. Paskoff (grpaskoff) | 257 comments Or humans in general.


message 21: by Scout (last edited Jun 30, 2020 08:26PM) (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 6184 comments I agree, G. R. More humans equals more consumption, more development, more deforestation, more decimation of wild animal populations, more problems overall globally.


message 22: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 11811 comments Yes, unfortunately we consume habitat as well as other consumables


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