The Jewels of Historical Romance discussion

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message 1: by Jill (new)

Jill Barnett | 12 comments I just finished THE ESCAPE, the new Mary Balogh. Loved it.


message 2: by Jill (last edited Jul 29, 2014 05:42PM) (new)

Jill Barnett | 12 comments Now I'm reading research. Not so lovely.


message 3: by Glynnis (new)

Glynnis | 14 comments I'm reading Goodreads instructions.


message 4: by Jill (new)

Jill Barnett | 12 comments LOL, Glynnis.


message 5: by Giulia (new)

Giulia I didn't know there was such a thing as Goodreads instructions.


message 6: by Jill (new)

Jill Barnett | 12 comments She's making them up. Everything she writes is made up.


message 7: by Giulia (new)

Giulia Is everything you write also made up? ;)


message 8: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl Bolen | 7 comments I just bought a book titled Studio Relations, which is a romance set in 1930's Hollywood. I love different time periods that are not "done to death."


message 9: by Giulia (new)

Giulia That does sound like an interesting period and setting! I'm reading a romantic suspense right now, but the last historical I read was Trade Winds by Christina Courtenay . I thought the setting was interceding, mostly set in Sweden then in China.


message 10: by Brenda (new)

Brenda Hiatt | 22 comments Mod
I always seem to be reading half a dozen books at once. I'll have to pick one to talk about.


message 11: by Lauren (new)

Lauren Royal (laurenroyal) | 14 comments I am between books. My daughter thinks I should read both THE FAULT IN OUR STARS and GONE GIRL. They are both sitting in our shared Kindle account, just waiting for me to tap "Download." Which one should I read first? Decisions, decisions...


message 12: by Jill (new)

Jill Barnett | 12 comments Jewels ♥ My Devastating Reads wrote: "Is everything you write also made up? ;)"


Yes, I lie for a living. JB


message 13: by Jill (new)

Jill Barnett | 12 comments Lauren wrote: "I am between books. My daughter thinks I should read both THE FAULT IN OUR STARS and GONE GIRL. They are both sitting in our shared Kindle account, just waiting for me to tap "Download." Which one ..."

Gone Girl is good, except for the bad ending, which I hear the author rewrote for the movie when the director said, "Bad ending."


message 14: by Lauren (new)

Lauren Royal (laurenroyal) | 14 comments Thanks for the warning, Jill! I am a reader who really prefers happily-ever-afters, so I will mentally prepare myself for the bad ending!


message 15: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Wright (cynwright) | 1 comments I am reading IF THE WALLS COULD TALK (An Intimate History of the Home), by Lucy Worsley, the chief curator at Historic Royal Palaces. It's a fascinating book that I'm mainly reading for research, but it's written so well! I heard an interview on NPR with the author that inspired me to buy the book in hardcover.

I buy most research books in hardcover - and I'm wondering if my Jewel sisters feel the same way?


message 16: by Lauren (new)

Lauren Royal (laurenroyal) | 14 comments Cindy, I am cheap. :-) I buy the least expensive versions of research books I can find, whether that's hardcover, paperback, or ebook. :-)

I have many hundreds of research books, though! I am a research book junkie. When my daughter and I started writing our Tudor series, I went through my research books and found more than 50 that covered the period, even though I'd never written that period before!


message 17: by Jill (last edited Jul 30, 2014 01:36AM) (new)

Jill Barnett | 12 comments Well, hardcovers are solid, but a couple of my favorite research books are old and out of print and in trade paperback. Also I'm cheap, so if I can save money I do. The truth is most of my research books come out of GB and university presses and they're not always readily available in paperback. My library is mostly hard, but many of those kinds of books are hardback size with paper bindings. I don't like research in digital at all. I'm an open book and pink marker researcher and I write all over the books. Since I downsized, my research library is in a bookcase lined, climate controlled 15 x 20 storage unit.


message 18: by Giulia (new)

Giulia Jill wrote: "Jewels ♥ My Devastating Reads wrote: "Is everything you write also made up? ;)"


Yes, I lie for a living. JB"


LOL


message 19: by Brenda (new)

Brenda Hiatt | 22 comments Mod
When I was writing Regencies, ebooks were still a dream way in the future, so my research library is almost all hard-copy, hardbacks and paperbacks. Though I admit I've bought a few research ebooks as well, especially when I see one on sale...even though I haven't had a chance to use those yet! But they're there, waiting for me, as soon as I get back to the Regency period. :)


message 20: by Lucinda (new)

Lucinda Brant | 5 comments I'm reading research books on the culture of diplomacy in the 1700s. It's not as dry as it sounds,as I'm specifically interested in the domestic arrangements for diplomats, their wives and children, oh and of course all that intrigue! I buy hardbacks (support the starving academic! ) :) where I can, and now eBook versions too if available because it is soooo much easier to carry around lots of books and they're searchable.


message 21: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl Bolen | 7 comments I am a huge research book junkie and still committed to buying print copies, which I mark up and flag pages. I know that having these on digital makes them even more searchable, but I'm an old dog. Agree with Jill that most of these books come from the UK--and I've often paid the postage. Ouch.


message 22: by Annette (new)

Annette Blair (annetteblair) | 5 comments Reply to Cynthia's question. I usually buy used hardcover research books, even if they're old library books. I love that other people have loved them. I like the bookplates, notes and dates they were used or given as a gift. It's the history of the thing, I guess. One of Regency research books has a note beside a picture that says: This is the view outside my window. :)


message 23: by Annette (new)

Annette Blair (annetteblair) | 5 comments Annette wrote: "Reply to Cynthia's question. I usually buy used hardcover research books, even if they're old library books. I love that other people have loved them. I like the bookplates, notes and dates they we..."

I also like finding postcards used as bookmarks because the note says something about the sender and previous owner.


message 24: by Brenda (new)

Brenda Hiatt | 22 comments Mod
I never thought of that aspect of used, older hardcovers, Annette! Now my imagination is fired by possible story ideas from a note found in an old library book... LOL!


message 25: by Giulia (new)

Giulia I'm finishing up The Lost Love of a Soldier (Marlow Intrigues #0.5) by Jane Lark I have thirty percent to go.


message 26: by Giulia (new)

Giulia I've received The Temptation of Laura by Rachel Brimble from the author and am about 25% in.


message 27: by Glynnis (new)

Glynnis | 14 comments Cheryl wrote: "I am a huge research book junkie and still committed to buying print copies, which I mark up and flag pages. I know that having these on digital makes them even more searchable, but I'm an old dog...."

Cheryl, you're going about it the wrong way. Instead of paying to have books sent to you, buy yourself an airline ticket and go pick them up. ;)


message 28: by Laurin (new)

Laurin (laurin_wittig) | 8 comments I'm reading Game of Thrones. Yes, I'm in withdrawal from the show and my son told me the writing was really good - he's read all but the last book in the series - so I should read it. He was right and I'm amazed at how close the TV show follows the books, at least as far as I've read. And, even though I know what happens in the story, I'm still riveted. That is good writing!


message 29: by Giulia (new)

Giulia It doesn't follow it that closely after book one.


message 30: by Laurin (new)

Laurin (laurin_wittig) | 8 comments My son warned me about that. He also warned me before I watched the first season never to get attached to a character. Sadly I'm very attached to Tyrion, Arya, and Danerys so I'm constantly waiting to be devastated.


message 31: by Giulia (new)

Giulia Those ones are all good still as far as I know :)


message 32: by Laurin (new)

Laurin (laurin_wittig) | 8 comments Thank goodness! I know my heart will break if any of them are killed off.


message 33: by Giulia (new)

Giulia I haven't read past the middle of the third book, but they were around and kicking last I picked up the novel. All three of those are kinda indispensable I think anyway.


message 34: by Laurin (new)

Laurin (laurin_wittig) | 8 comments That is my hope! My son just smiles and refuses to give me any hints, good or bad, about their fates.


message 35: by Giulia (new)

Giulia My co-worker gave a bunch of plot line away because she thought I'd read the whole series. She has no idea how distracting romance novels are. I love the Game of Thrones books, but they do kinda get you down a bit. You never reach the end of one with a le sigh feeling. It's more of a feeling of dread. And wonder that they still haven't killed off that horrible Cersei.


message 36: by Laurin (new)

Laurin (laurin_wittig) | 8 comments Lol! Exactly about romances. I love that I know I'll be happy at the end of them especially when I don't know how the characters are going to get there.

My son knows me well enough to know I don't really want him to tell me what happens to my favorite three in GoT but he does enjoy keeping me in suspense, too.


message 37: by Giulia (new)

Giulia I'm not a fan of spoilers either LOL I don't want to know what's going to happen next either. I was a little upset at my co-worker for spoiling parts of GoT for me. After all, I'm going to finish the books. Eventually ;)


message 38: by Giulia (new)

Giulia I'm reading Wonderful (Medieval Trilogy, #1) by Jill Barnett


message 39: by Glynnis (last edited Nov 11, 2014 10:09AM) (new)

Glynnis | 14 comments A Knight in Tarnished Armor (Three Sisters Trilogy, #2) by Jill Barnett
I just read Jill Barnett's novella, "A Knight in Tarnished Armor." It's delightful and sweet, sort of "Sleeping Beauty" meets "Camelot."


message 40: by Lauren (new)

Lauren Royal (laurenroyal) | 14 comments I'm reading Sophie Kinsella's new book, "Shopaholic to the Stars." It's delightful!


message 41: by Glynnis (new)

Glynnis | 14 comments I'm reading Tudor Monastery Farm, based on the BBC TV series. It's for research, so not exactly escapism, but it's full of great photos and interesting tidbits for upcoming books. Tudor Monastery Farm by Peter Ginn


message 42: by Brenda (last edited Nov 16, 2014 08:03AM) (new)

Brenda Hiatt | 22 comments Mod
I'm reading "Obsidian," the first book in Jennifer Armentrout's "Lux" series. Not quite what I expected, but fun. Obsidian (Lux, #1) by Jennifer L. Armentrout


message 43: by Glynnis (last edited Nov 19, 2014 08:38AM) (new)

Glynnis | 14 comments Again for research, but I'm poring over "A History of Everyday Things in England: Volume I 1500-1799" by Marjorie Quennell. I like it because it focuses more on social history than political.
A History of Everyday Things in England Volume II 1500-1799 by Marjorie Quennell


message 44: by Glynnis (new)

Glynnis | 14 comments I just read this kid's picture book for a review exchange...
Journey to Jazzland by Gia Volterra De Saulnier
It's cute--sort of Peewee's Playhouse meets the Wizard of Oz.


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