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One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter
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One day we'll all be dead... > Fighting Two Uphill Battles

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SCPL (st_catharines_public_library) | 542 comments Mod
Throughout her book, Scaachi often refers to two uphill battles that she's constantly up against: being a female in the publishing business and being an 'Other' (that is to say, of Indian descent).

I can only empathize with one of these battles and even in that respect, partially so. I have the luxury of working in an organization with a high female population and it would be difficult to discover a glass ceiling that still required shattering. Scaachi, however, works in publishing. These days, publishing almost inevitably goes hand-in-hand with social media, which means a constant barrage of unsolicited opinions. For example, Scaachi's simple tweet that asked for media to diversify (to go beyond non-white and non-male) led to a hailstorm of threatening and derogatory responses.

Scaachi is also of Indian decent and, oftentimes, people she associated with growing up said horribly racist things to her, particularly during her high school years (some very intentional, others simply ignorant), most of which were absolutely unrelated to her cultural background. (Check out the Fair & Lovely chapter) "Racism," the author writes, "does not have to be accurate, it just has to be acute."

Do you think that people living in Canada have become more accepting of a more diverse population over the last fifteen years? (since Scaachi was in high school)

How do you think Scaachi feels about living as a minority in Canada?


Heidi Madden | 118 comments I really liked the comment about racism not having to be “accurate, just acute.” That is so true.

Part of me wants to say that yes, “Canada” is more accepting of a diverse population. I mean you have at least two generations of school-children (at least since the mid-eighties if not before) who have been raised with multiculturalism as the norm in the school curriculum. So it seems like we SHOULD be more accepting. But then you turn to the news or social media and see the terrible horrible things that people still say to each other and realize just how far we still have to go.

How do I think Scaachi feels? Probably more comfortable than the people who are uncomfortable with her being here. If that makes sense. She’s chose to use her voice to speak out which is commendable. But she inevitable gets flak for that (another trait she shares with Jen Agg!) I think her insights about how the internet makes us “invisible” and how people hide behind keyboards was very insightful. I was also kind of amazed at the time and patience she poured into working with the people who verbally abused her to figure out where their anger was really directed. That’s is very admirable. I don’t think I would have the patience for it!


Jean | 5 comments Heidi, I agree Scaachi is very comfortable in her role. I like how she is breaking ground for women, journalists and minorities. Her revelations may help newer and older female generations too.


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SCPL (st_catharines_public_library) | 542 comments Mod
Hi Heidi - I love your comment about how Scaachi "probably more comfortable than the people who are uncomfortable with her being here." I think that's SO true! I'm sure that feeling doesn't apply across the board for everyone who is new to this country but the author is obviously very proud of her heritage (maybe more so now than in high school!) and that pride definitely gives her confidence.

Jean, you make a great point - Scaachi is also helping bring confidence to other minorities and women as well!

People certainly do take advantage of the anonymity of the Internet to hide behind their comments. I have a hard enough time reading commentary on social networking platforms that are directed at OTHER people and I have to step away because I feel so indignant on their behalf! I can't even imagine reading, never mind engaging in, abusive commentary directed at me like Scacchi did!!

~Marcella


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