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The Picture-Book Club > June 2018: Women's Suffrage (Master List and General Discussion)

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message 1: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (last edited May 20, 2018 05:21PM) (new)

Kathryn | 6266 comments Mod
In June, our focus will be on Women's Suffrage. It is now time to vote for the six books you would most like to read in June. Please choose from the nominations here and post your choices in a comment here. Votes will be collected until May 27th. Thank you!


message 3: by Laura (new)


message 6: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 2247 comments I picked up some at the library today, have some on hold to pick up on Saturday and some to sit and read at the library. I'll add to the list if I find any more good ones.


message 7: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 2247 comments Marching with Aunt Susan: Susan B. Anthony and the Fight for Women's Suffrage is a must read if only for the author and illustrator's amazing use of archival sources! I wish this book had been around when I was much much younger. I enjoyed the story too but it's so specific to California and that one moment in time. I think I liked the historical notes in the back and the endpapers more.


message 9: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 6266 comments Mod
Thank you for the nominations. It is now time to vote for the six books you would most like to read in June. Please choose from the nominations above and post your choices in a comment here. Votes will be collected until May 27th. Thank you!


message 12: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2596 comments Mod
Around America to win the vote
A Lady has the floor: Belva Lockwood
Ballots for Belva
Ballot Box Battle
Elizabeth leads the way
I Could do that: Esther Morris


message 14: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 6266 comments Mod
This thread now becomes the Master List and General Discussion for PB about Women's Suffrage.

I can't get the chosen Esther Morris book but my library does have another picture book about her and I plan to read that and will post my thoughts here:
When Esther Morris Headed West: Women, Wyoming, and the Right to Vote


message 15: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 2247 comments Kathryn I have them both on hand from the library and will be happy to compare/contrast them.

This is my favorite subject and yet I've managed to find some incredible women I have never heard of. Be prepared to have your mind blown by Belva Lockwood. That particular book doesn't say that (view spoiler) Alice Paul is a favorite of mine too.


message 16: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 6266 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "I have never heard of. Be prepared to have your mind blown by Belva Lockwood. That particular book doesn't say that"

Wow, that's amazing!!! I am looking forward to learning more about these remarkable people, too. It will be great having an expert such as yourself on board for the discussions! :-)


message 17: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 2247 comments Kathryn wrote: "It will be great having an expert such as yourself on board for the discussions! :-)
.."


I wouldn't say I'm an expert but I wrote about educated New England women in reform in the 19th century and early 20th century and I remember reading every suffragette novel I could find at the library when I was about 9-12. FYI: Reject books that use the word suffragette. That was considered a derogatory term. The women referred to themselves as suffragists and their cause was Woman Suffrage. I can poke holes in my childhood favorite Happy Birthday Samantha!: A Springtime Story. I recommend a visit to the National Women's Party Headquarters in Washington, DC.


message 18: by Anne (new)

Anne Nydam | 124 comments Actually, although "suffragette" may have been considered derogatory in the US, it refers to members of the Women's Social and Political Union in the UK, the more militant branch of suffragists led by Emmeline Pankhurst and others. "The Suffragette" was the name of their own newspaper.


message 19: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8792 comments Mod
In July, there will be a longer picture book coming out about the British suffragettes, Suffragettes and the Fight for the Vote (the hardcover, as the paperback edition will only be out come November).


message 20: by Manybooks (last edited May 30, 2018 04:59PM) (new)

Manybooks | 8792 comments Mod
Now, I do know that My Best Friend the Suffragette by Sally Morgan is NOT a picture book, but a middle grade epistolary historical fiction novel set in early 20th century England, but it is a fun and enlightening read and does cover many of the main issues with regard to the British suffragette movement, including the dissent between Emmeline Pankhurst's more radical group and others who wanted to create change without violence and vandalism.


message 21: by QNPoohBear (last edited May 30, 2018 05:32PM) (new)

QNPoohBear | 2247 comments Both those books sound awesome, especially the one that uses archival sources. I wish I could get them here in the U.S. I may have to order them online.

Anne wrote: "Actually, although "suffragette" may have been considered derogatory in the US, it refers to members of the Women's Social and Political Union in the UK, the more militant branch of suffragists led..."

Alice Paul was a member of the WSPU while studying at Oxford. The difference between the two terms is the militant action of the WSPU vs. the civil disobedience favored more by the American suffragists. The media picked up on the difference to characterize the suffragettes are unladylike vs. suffragists who were more gentle and ladylike. Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Carrie Chapman Catt were all suffragists. Alice Paul was both. Suffragette is now considered an outdated term in academia.

Darn technology for changing so quickly. If I can find my paper, I'll see what sources I used but a quick Google search brings up some scholarly sources.


message 22: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8792 comments Mod
Suffragettes and the Fight for the Vote

Interesting, factual, and thankfully generally educationally straight-forward and unemotional (although sometimes perhaps a trifle overly narrationally and informationally dense for the intended age group, for older children from about the ages of nine to twelve or so), but truth be told, Sarah Ridley's Suffragettes and the Fight for the Vote is also both suitable and indeed glowingly recommended to and for interested adults who might desire a relatively condensed and basic but still always and generally detailed and textually "meaty" enough introduction to the history of the struggles for women to obtain the basic human right of being allowed to vote in political elections both at the local and the national levels (in the United Kingdom). And Suffragettes and the Fight for the Vote therefore presents and features a for the most part readable and above all also well and intensely, meticulously researched and organised marriage of Sarah Ridley's non-fiction text and accompanying photographs and illustrations, including a number of rather telling and interesting, but also ridiculously nasty caricatures of suffragettes, of women who dared to demand the right to vote, who dared to demand equal rights as men (which in my opinion certainly does show for one how scared and hysterically frightened many men and in particular many politicians were of even considering granting women the right to vote and for two how that same encountered all-round male dominated negativity might actually have also been one of the main reasons that some women's rights organisations started to become increasingly impatient and to promote not only verbally demanding the right to vote but also began to react with violence and increasingly destructive acts of civil disobedience, with acts of vandalism, physical assault and the like, although according to the author, the activists supposedly did try to make sure that especially and in particular if they set arson fires, that the buildings being targeted were empty of people and animals, although I for one doubt that this could have been even all that easily verified to the extent necessary to make sure that no lives were in danger).

And with said latter fact in mind, while I am on an intellectual and entirely academic level quite appreciative of the fact that the author's, that Sarah Ridley's presented narrative is by in-large striving with Suffragettes and the Fight for the Vote to simply show and feature the main movers and shakers of the United Kingdom women's suffrage movement without too much analysis and personal interpretation (and yes, that Sarah Ridley also portrays not only the women who tirelessly fought for voting rights for ALL, gender notwithstanding, but also does point out some of the men who were equally in favour of votes for women) I still and definitely would have liked and even rather wanted a bit more comparison and contrast with regard to the more radical (and violence, acts of anarchic vandalism supporting) suffrage societies such as the WSPU to other groups that were as committed to women obtaining the right to vote but absolutely rejected violence as a means to obtain this end (not to mention that especially Emmeline Pankhurst obviously tended to show some rather dictatorial tendencies as leader of the WSPU, often categorically ejecting any members who dared to criticise her leadership and in particular those individuals who in any manner questioned the promotion, enabling and support of violence and vandalism). And finally, on an entirely emotional (and personal) level, that whole scenario, that episode during Derby Day, 1913, when Emily Wilding Davison killed herself by stepping in front of King George V's horse Anmer, well sorry, I for one have NEVER seen her behaviour as in any way even remotely laudable (or martyr-like) as she could with and by her behaviour have so easily caused serious injury and perhaps even death to either Anmer or the jockey astride of him (and frankly, and with my apologies to those of you who actually might indeed think that Emily Wilding Davison acted justifiably and correctly, and with that I mean to say supportively of women's rights, it is in my humble opinion very lucky that it was only she who ended up gravely injured and later dead, as her foolishness could so easily have killed that poor horse, and as a horse enthusiast, that is something I just cannot and will not accept, not to mention that if Anmer had spooked and run into the crowd of spectators in a panic, there could easily and even likely have been massive injuries, and all caused, all the fault of Emily Wilding Davison).

Three full and indeed very glowing stars for Suffragettes and the Fight for the Vote (and while from and on a thematic and informational point of view, the book most definitely is a wonderful and educational introduction to the history and the struggle for women's suffrage in the United Kingdom, I just cannot and will not with a clear conscience give four stars to a one hundred percent non fiction history book that does neither include source acknowledgments nor any suggestions for further study and reading, as this absolutely does majorly infuriate academically oriented me and also totally lessens the supplemental research, the teaching and learning potential and value of Suffragettes and the Fight for the Vote (and I actually have trouble understanding why Sarah Ridley has NOT included bibliographical information in this otherwise excellent and enlightening book).


message 23: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (last edited Jul 30, 2018 01:52PM) (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6837 comments Mod
Ladies Were Not Expected: Abigail Scott Duniway and Women's Rights is not a picture-book, but it does look like an interesting juvenile biography. I'll be starting it tonight....

I found this engaging and rounded my evaluation to four-stars. Review here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 24: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 2247 comments A Mighty Girl's new blog post with books on women's suffrage from picture book to adults. Most of the picture books we've read or recommended but there are some new books I haven't read yet and plan to when I get a chance.


message 25: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8792 comments Mod
This is very long and as such not really a picture book but an illustrated non fiction account, and I am only posting the title because the subject fits, the illustrations are wonderful and it is well written, but the complete lack of bibliographic materials makes me absolutely livid, Suffragette: The Battle for Equality.


message 26: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 6266 comments Mod
Thanks for posting! Definitely relevant. It really is a shame how many new/recent PB biographies contain no or scant bibliographical info. I just don’t see any excuse for that ever in scholarship let alone in this day and age.


message 27: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8792 comments Mod
Kathryn wrote: "Thanks for posting! Definitely relevant. It really is a shame how many new/recent PB biographies contain no or scant bibliographical info. I just don’t see any excuse for that ever in scholarship l..."

Absolutely no excuse, especially for longer non fiction books geared towards older children! With no bibliography, if I were a teacher, I would even hesitate allowing my students to use this in a class project, book report or paper, as there really is no way to check the author’s information.


message 28: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 6266 comments Mod
It truly goes against academia as well as common sense. If a student submitted a report without a bibliography that would be unacceptable. One must show ones sources! Argh.


message 29: by Manybooks (last edited Sep 26, 2019 05:24AM) (new)

Manybooks | 8792 comments Mod
Kathryn wrote: "It truly goes against academia as well as common sense. If a student submitted a report without a bibliography that would be unacceptable. One must show ones sources! Argh."

Exactly, and it also gives students a very bad form to follow. How can students learn that one must show sources if the non fiction books he or she reads do not do this.


message 30: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 2247 comments Rightfully Ours: How Women Won the Vote, 21 Activities a non-fiction, in-depth look at the women's suffrage movement from just after the Revolutionary War to the 19th amendment. The text is easy to read and understand, the author defines unfamiliar words, it includes a lot of primary source images and quotes, fun projects to do at home, a list of resources including places to visit and an index. The only thing I want to criticize- and this is a big one- is the way women of color got thrown under the bus by Alice Paul and Carrie Chapman Catt. There's no mention of how suffrage didn't extend to all citizens until 1965. This is not something I knew as a child and would have wanted to know. This book also doesn't mention any Native American suffragists either. I also would have liked the author to either remove the fact about Anna Howard Shaw never marrying or mention that Anna Howard Shaw did indeed have a supportive partner- another woman. (Thank you Wikipedia!) It's important to note that these women found support with each other. Another minor thing I would have included was that Lucy Burns was so broken by her jail time and was in such poor health she quit activism after the 19th amendment was passed.

If there's an updated version of the book these things might be corrected along with listing the Lucy Burns Institute under places to visit.

Not as in-depth is With Courage and Cloth: Winning the Fight for a Woman's Right to Vote
This book for older children focuses on Alice Paul and the National Women's Party. That's it. The writing is dry and I think this one is better suited to teachers and students writing papers. The photographs have been tinted in purple and gold for the National Women's Party which is a little weird. The originals can be found on the Library of Congress website. Includes profiles, chronology and resource guide.


message 31: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 6266 comments Mod
Thank you for sharing!


message 32: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 2247 comments The two books I mentioned aren't exactly picture books per say but they're not chapter books either so I thought I'd mention them here anyway. I enjoyed Rightfully Ours: How Women Won the Vote, 21 Activities more. I may have more books for this category to check out. Other people are interested in this topic right now too, obviously and that's great! My nieces heard about the 19th amendment in school last year. They can't wait to be old enough to vote!


message 33: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 6266 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "The two books I mentioned aren't exactly picture books per say but they're not chapter books either so I thought I'd mention them here anyway. I enjoyed [book:Rightfully Ours: How Women Won the Vot..."

That's great!


message 34: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6837 comments Mod
Thank you for the extra information that wasn't included in the more in-depth book. It is a shame that some of the white women fighting for suffrage didn't feel it important to be as inclusive as possible....

It seems as if it's human nature to always define 'one's own' vs, 'those others' that don't matter.

I don't have any idea how to get past that except to keep reminding each other about it whenever we see it.


message 35: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 2247 comments Cheryl wrote: Thank you for the extra information that wasn't included in the more in-depth book. It is a shame that some of the white women fighting for suffrage didn't feel it important to be as inclusive as possible....."

The first book says Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton fell prey to a male master marketing genius who also happened to be virulently racist. Even Alice Paul threw women of color under the bus. The second book states she believed women's suffrage was the MOST important thing. Once women had the right to vote, she assumed they'd vote for reforms of all kind. She basically let the states decide who could vote and for most states that meant educated whites and not immigrants or people of color. I was shocked, in my research, to learn my grandmother and her mother and grandmother couldn't automatically vote in Massachusetts when they became citizens unless they chose to/could afford to pay a poll tax. I know my grandmother had political opinions but I don't know how old she was when she first voted. My dad was already a teenager by 1965.

Anyway, I was sadly disappointed in my heroes for not being more inclusive. Immigrants, working class women and women of color did organize to march in parades, etc. for the right to vote, they just didn't earn it until 1965.

I have one more women's suffrage picture book on hold at the library.


message 36: by Kelly (last edited Nov 22, 2020 04:27PM) (new)

Kelly Wilson (kellysclassroomonline) I haven't read the entire thread... but I wanted to share this book I found on NetGalley not too long ago. I meant to write a blog post about it, but haven't found the time yet. It fits in with the theme of women's suffrage. The Big Day by Terry Lee Caruthers

The Big Day by Terry Lee Caruthers
https://www.netgalley.com/catalog/boo...


message 37: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6837 comments Mod
I'm always glad to see new posts on these old threads!


message 38: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 2247 comments Kelly wrote: "I haven't read the entire thread... but I wanted to share this book I found on NetGalley not too long ago. I meant to write a blog post about it, but haven't found the time yet. It fits in with the..."

That looks fantastic!


message 39: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 2247 comments Fight of the Century: Alice Paul Battles Woodrow Wilson for the Vote Fight of the Century Alice Paul Battles Woodrow Wilson for the Vote by Barb Rosenstock

Framed as a boxing match between suffragist Alice Paul and President Woodrow Wilson, this book nicely summarizes the key points of Alice Paul and the NWP's campaign for women's suffrage. It even includes Alice Paul's jail time and hunger strike. Being a picture book for children, the story is naturally very short and summarized but the author really hits the key points. In the back, there's a timeline of women's suffrage, a two-page biographical note of Alice Paul's fight and an extensive list of sources for adults, quotation sources. The only real problems I have with the book are 1) I didn't like the boxing match format and 2)The storybook portion mentions how Alice's Quaker faith made her believe everyone was equal yet neglects to mention how she let the segregationists throw Black women under the bus. However, the author's note DOES explain what happened and how Ida B. Wells refused to march in the back of the parade.

The illustrations are excellent! The author based the style on lithographs of the period. She really paid attention to detail in regards to the fashions of the time and copied what she saw. I'm impressed. (Fashion history nerd)

This may be the best picture book about Alice Paul I've read so far.


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