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Rebecca
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Group Reads > 2018 Rebecca Read - No spoilers!

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message 1: by Critterbee❇ (last edited May 15, 2018 07:29AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 352 comments "Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again..."

I am so excited to finally be reading Rebecca! This is my first read, so I will probably stay in the no spoilers thread for most of the read. Any other first time readers?


Karlyne Landrum | 1964 comments I can't even remember how long it's been since I read it, so other than the flavor of the book, it seems new to me.


message 3: by Abigail (new) - added it

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 724 comments I have never read it and would like to but am not sure time will allow right now.


Peggy (dandelion_cottage) | 272 comments I won't get a chance to reread this time (though I've read it so many times, I might lurk), but I'm jealous of any of you who are reading it for the first time. :)

❇Critterbee wrote: ""Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again..."

I am so excited to finally be reading Rebecca! This is my first read, so I will probably stay in the no spoilers thread for most of the read. Any..."



Karlyne Landrum | 1964 comments Wish you all could join us!


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 1414 comments I’ve never read it before and am trying to get a copy from my library.


Linda Dobinson (baspoet) | 57 comments I read it many years ago and enjoyed it very much. I look forward to reading your opinions.


Karlyne Landrum | 1964 comments Yay, Susan!


Karlyne Landrum | 1964 comments My first thoughts are that our heroine is incredibly young. I'm not sure I've ever been that young and certainly not at the age of 21. Maybe at 10...😁 But I am loving her humble spirit, although when it comes to, especially, Mrs Danvers, I wish I could be there to face her nasty old self down! She needs someone to notice that she needs help and then someone to do it.


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 1414 comments Hi, Karlyne!


Karlyne Landrum | 1964 comments Susan in NC wrote: "Hi, Karlyne!"

Does your library have a copy? I'll keep reading slowly... (ha! I'm tutoring a grandgirl right now and her laptop is spinning, so I checked to see if mine is good...)


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 1414 comments Yes, I requested a copy, I’m just waiting for it to come in...hopefully in the next couple days!


Karlyne Landrum | 1964 comments I just finished Chapter VIII, and the tension, which is at this time all coming from the writer, is intense. It's not just that she is down on herself, which she is, but that she is seeing herself as she must be seen by others. Her handwriting "without individuality, without style, uneducated even, the writing of an indifferent pupil taught in a second-rate school" is a serious reflection on who she is.


Karlyne Landrum | 1964 comments I'm finding it interesting that although our heroine must be jealous of Rebecca, she's not really manifesting it in a typical way. It's more that Rebecca's beauty, poise, and efficiency scare her; she doesn't want to BE Rebecca but just wants to hide from her.

Should we call her, by the way, The Second Mrs. De Winter? Or maybe just invent a nice name for her, like Jane?


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 1414 comments Karlyne wrote: "I'm finding it interesting that although our heroine must be jealous of Rebecca, she's not really manifesting it in a typical way. It's more that Rebecca's beauty, poise, and efficiency scare her; ..."

Thank you! Just started last night and realized, I don’t know what to call the narrator! I defer to those who’ve read before; a little clunky to refer to her as “ the narrator”!


Karlyne Landrum | 1964 comments DuMaurier makes her not exactly faceless (we know she's thin, not very tall and has straight, lank, bobbed hair), but she makes her nameless, I think so that we buy into her own opinion of herself as someone who doesn't matter. Without a name, we're nobody...


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 1414 comments So true...it’s strange, because I’m just reading chapter 4, when Max and the girl first lunch together, and he tells her she has “a lovely and unusual name”...


Karlyne Landrum | 1964 comments Susan in NC wrote: "So true...it’s strange, because I’m just reading chapter 4, when Max and the girl first lunch together, and he tells her she has “a lovely and unusual name”..."

I missed that! But it fits in with what Max apparently sees in her as opposed to what she sees in herself.


Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 352 comments I finished the first two chapters, and the writing is so beautiful! The early, dreamy descriptions of Manderley, and Mrs Van Hopper's pig eyes, and mouth dripping with sauce! How the narrator feels so like nothing.


Karlyne Landrum | 1964 comments ❇Critterbee wrote: "I finished the first two chapters, and the writing is so beautiful! The early, dreamy descriptions of Manderley, and Mrs Van Hopper's pig eyes, and mouth dripping with sauce! How the narrator feels..."

A little later on, a character refers to her as "modest", and she doesn't know what he means, but I see what he's trying to say. She's not, as many people are, falsely self-effacing because they're afraid of seeming arrogant, but really and truly thinks of herself as a nonentity.


message 21: by Barb in Maryland (new)

Barb in Maryland | 499 comments Karlyne wrote: "Susan in NC wrote: "So true...it’s strange, because I’m just reading chapter 4, when Max and the girl first lunch together, and he tells her she has “a lovely and unusual name”..."

I missed that! ..."


Well, I've always thought that Max chose her because she was the antithesis of Rebecca. That was her big attraction for him.


Allegra | 34 comments I dont see Rebecca on the home page. Is this book for the second half of May? I see the June book, and my yet-unstarted Thirkell.


Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 352 comments Allegra wrote: "I dont see Rebecca on the home page. Is this book for the second half of May? I see the June book, and my yet-unstarted Thirkell."

The Rebecca read has only just started (May 15), and you're right, it is not on the home page of the group. Let's see if we can fix that.


message 24: by Susan in NC (last edited May 17, 2018 11:42AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 1414 comments Barb in Maryland wrote: "Karlyne wrote: "Susan in NC wrote: "So true...it’s strange, because I’m just reading chapter 4, when Max and the girl first lunch together, and he tells her she has “a lovely and unusual name”..."
..."


Agree wholeheartedly; it’s my first time reading, and the writing is amazing, but it feels so oppressive! I guess for romantic suspense that’s to be expected. I like our heroine, but hate that she feels she’s a non-entity.

I’ve got the paperback from my library, and was interested to find a few differences from the audiobook I was listening to (wonderfully narrated by Anna Massey), odd little things like the paperback said there were six books in the art book set given by Beatrice as a wedding present, but the audiobook said it had four books. All the changes are small, seemingly unimportant text changes like that.


Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 352 comments I am through the 4th chapter now, or wherever she is when he gives her the poetry book, and that poem (!) and the heavy Rebecca signature, all these little details just drawing a picture of Rebecca, and how much the narrator is in awe of her already.


Karlyne Landrum | 1964 comments That's odd, Susan (my book says 6, too) - I wonder if it's the reader or the book she's reading from.

Our heroine is so humble that she's in awe of Rebecca, like you said, Critterbee, and she's frightened of her, too. If she'd had the chance to actually meet her, I think she would have hidden behind the door.

I'm far enough into the book that I'm going to jump over to the spoiler thread, so I don't let anything slip. Except I'll mention the incredible tension that builds and builds and builds...


Susan in Perthshire (susanageofaquarius) | 3 comments I think Daphne du Maureen was such an amazing writer. I have read Rebecca several times and always become engaged in the story and with our nameless narrator - as if I had never read the book before!
It really is an amazingly brave thing to do -create a character who is both narrator and important character - yet is totally anonymous. The characters and setting are so out-with my own experience and yet the author manages to make it real and fascinating and sympathetic to me. The second Mrs de Winter is so vulnerable, so frighteningly at the mercy of all around her that one shudders in fear of what might happen to her. Fabulous descriptions and wonderful plotting. Looking forward to the rest!


Christmas Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 1750 comments Mod
Yes sorry about not changing the book to currently reading! It doesn't change over automatically & I am ahead of Pacific Standard time so I often forget.

I remember in the book that Max (view spoiler)

@ Susan in P - yes amazing writing skills in this book!


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 1414 comments Susan in Perthshire wrote: "I think Daphne du Maureen was such an amazing writer. I have read Rebecca several times and always become engaged in the story and with our nameless narrator - as if I had never read the book befor..."

This is my first read, and you sum it up so well!

The audiobook I’m listening too has the same picture as the cover photo above.


Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 352 comments So far, there is a sense of evil approaching, mainly because of the early references to how things are now. (The 'present' scenes from early in the book, before the flash back to Monte Carlo).


Karlyne Landrum | 1964 comments Yes! We already know that evil has happened, but not how or why or even who.


Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 352 comments "When the leaves rustle, they sound very much like the stealthy movement of a woman in evening dress, and when they shiver suddenly, and fall, and scatter away along the ground, they might be the patter of a woman’s hurrying footsteps, and the mark in the gravel the imprint of a high-heeled shoe."

Beautiful, and unnerving at the same time!


Karlyne Landrum | 1964 comments That's the word! Unnerving!


Elinor | 209 comments One feels sorry for the nameless protagonist as she is such a pathetic little creature, but it's difficult to identify with her.

It's a fascinating book, though. My real-life book club read it and we all enjoyed it and had a lively discussion.


Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 352 comments Ah, I totally identify with her, but I do not think that is a healthy thing! When I was younger, I could disappear into my mind and create scenarios to live, only to be brought back to reality at the end of the car ride / when another person spoke, etc as she does in the beginning of the book.


Karlyne Landrum | 1964 comments She reminds me (a lot!) of both Jane Eyre and Fanny Price (Mansfield Park), but she doesn't have their stiff sense of morality. She definitely counts the world well lost for love, and, as far as justice is concerned, I think she feels Rebecca got what she deserved for not playing fair with the beloved Max, so she's not concerned with justice at all.


Elinor | 209 comments @Karlyne -- Yes, Jane Eyre is a good comparison! Physically they could be twins.


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 1414 comments Karlyne wrote: "She reminds me (a lot!) of both Jane Eyre and Fanny Price (Mansfield Park), but she doesn't have their stiff sense of morality. She definitely counts the world well lost for love, and, as far as ju..."

Yes!


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 1414 comments Elinor wrote: "@Karlyne -- Yes, Jane Eyre is a good comparison! Physically they could be twins."

Oh, yes, great comparison, physically and plot wise.


Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 352 comments I have not been able to post so much due to internet issues, but I wanted to say that I am finding some similarities to Georgette Heyer's Barren Corn! Just spots here and there, and certainly the overall quality of Rebecca is much higher than Barren Corn, but I was surprised by a few things.


Karlyne Landrum | 1964 comments I've never been able to find any of the suppressed novels, so that's interesting, Critterbee! They must have been written during the same time period, too?


Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 352 comments Barren Corn was published in 1930, I believe, and Rebecca was 1938?


Karlyne Landrum | 1964 comments I wonder if DuMaurier read Heyer?


Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 352 comments She might have! OR, they both wrote about things they were observing in life, and they both lived at the same time, with similar experiences.


Elinor | 209 comments What an interesting idea -- that popular authors are influenced by other popular authors.


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