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The Prose Edda
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Archive: Other Books > Prose Edda - Snorri Sturluson - 3 stars

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Jason Oliver | 2098 comments The Prose Edda was written or compiled in the 13th century. It quotes from poems that scholars believe to give evidence of an older Edda. The discovery of a version of the Poetic Edda, written after the Prose Edda, adds further proof of the existence of a Poetic Edda that was written before the Prose Edda. Because of this, The Prose Edda is refereed to as the Younger Edda and the Poetic Edda as the Older Edda.

These two works are pretty much all we know about Norse mythology. This is not an easy read a Neil Gaiman 2017 Norse Mythology is a much more entertaining read.

I enjoyed seeing the connections to Greek, Roman, and Norse mythology. I enjoy the stories but again, it is not an easy read.


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Karin | 7468 comments Correct. This book, though, as I might have mentioned elsewhere, was used as a textbook on Scaldic poetry. The poetry in this book is NOT the best (not surprising you gave it 3 stars), and was never considered top poetry. However, it was prized for how well it helped people understand this.

No, this information is not on wikipedia, but I read a couple of biographies on Snorri Sturluson (as I mentioned in that other thread, one of my ancestors).

Actually, Heimskringla: or, The Lives of the Norse Kings also includes some information on Norse mythology, with a rather strong connection to Nimrod, et al if you are familiar with the history of the Babylonian Mystery Religion, from which some say Norse, Egyptian and Hindu religions came from. Middle Earth is what we call the Middle East today. This is before the parts about the Norse kings and is considered one of the two greatest history books of the middle ages. He even travelled and did a bit of research.


Jason Oliver | 2098 comments Karin wrote: "Actually, Heimskringla: or, The Lives of the Norse Kings also includes some information on Norse mythology, with a rather strong connection to Nimrod, et al if you are familiar with the history of the Babylonian Mystery Religion..."

This is very interesting. Another book to add to the TBR. I also wonder how many mythologies can also be traced back to the Nephilim and their fathers.


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Karin | 7468 comments Jason wrote: "Karin wrote: "Actually, Heimskringla: or, The Lives of the Norse Kings also includes some information on Norse mythology, with a rather strong connection to Nimrod, et al if you are familiar with t..."

Nimrod was descended from Noah and born after the flood. He founded Babylon.


Jason Oliver | 2098 comments Yes I know who Nimrod was. Wanted to build a tower to the heavens and not disperse through the earth. It was at that point that God confused the languages and that place became none as Babel.

Just was proposing the idea of the Nephilim being sources for some myths. They fit the prototype right? I'm sure Noah, Shem, Ham, and Japheth told their decedent's of the materialized angles and their sons and possibly the stories grew. Maybe even grew enough by Nimrod's time.


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Karin | 7468 comments Jason wrote: "Yes I know who Nimrod was. Wanted to build a tower to the heavens and not disperse through the earth. It was at that point that God confused the languages and that place became none as Babel.

Jus..."


I don't know much about that, although Dagon is most likely post-diluvian given that he was a fish god.


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