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Footnotes 2017-2018 > Sunday Conversation Topic 5/13

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message 1: by Jason (new)

Jason Oliver | 2098 comments Is there a book, fiction or non, that you have a connection to. Are you, your family, or your ancestors mentioned in a book? Is your street or neighborhood mentioned in a book? Anyone you know or related to the inspiration for a story or character?

If yes, tell us a little about it. How you discovered this information, what it means to you and anything else you can think of.


message 2: by Karin (last edited May 13, 2018 11:54AM) (new)

Karin | 7470 comments Sure, my mother's ancestors (and so mine) show up in the Icelandic Sagas, and we are descended (more than once) from the author Snorri Sturluson. One of his works was used as a poetry text for about 600 years, but he wrote other things as well.

On a more contemporary note, Samba Dreamers was written by someone I used to know IRL and am friends with on FB, Kathleen De Azevedo. I was in the world premiere production of a student play she wrote (which she forgot all about until we did a catch up a few years ago) as she was dating her now husband who was the director of the special theatre programme (aka theater program) I was in in San Francisco back in the dark ages before your time ;). It's a dark novel, and while well written and an award winner, I won't be reading more of her books. She warned me it was dark :).

I know/knew authors of a few Canadian memoirs.

My parents have been friends with this author's children since before I was in kindergarten, so I met her, Christie Harris when I was little.

There are more, but I can't think of them off the top of my head. No one I know well is a famous author nowadays, though.

My home town comes up in the novel The Goat Lady's Daughter and my mother was interviewed because we knew two sisters that two main characters in this book are based on (rather loosely based, in my opinion).

WOW! I did a google, and apparently there is a mystery series set in my home town, which unlike what they say, is not SLEEPY!!! It was much smaller and different when I was little.

The first book is called The Suspect, but the the author bio doesn't say if she ever actually lived there, but she's from the city where my dad went to medical school.


message 3: by LibraryCin (last edited May 13, 2018 11:49AM) (new)

LibraryCin | 9068 comments I grew up in a small town in Saskatchewan. There were two doctors in town when I was younger. One of them wrote a book of memoirs. (Actually, I think he wrote a couple books, but this is the one - linked to below - that focused on "my" town.) My dad was mentioned in the book, as the doctor was also mayor of the town when I was a teenager, and dad was a councillor at the same time.

More Prairie Doctor

ETA: How I discovered this book. Dad had a copy, so I borrowed it from him.


message 4: by Karin (last edited May 13, 2018 11:52AM) (new)

Karin | 7470 comments Okay, so this same novelist that wrote The Goat Lady's Daughte (which I own and have read) also wrote another novel on one of those women

The Cougar Lady: Legendary Trapper of Sechelt Inlet

but I'm annoyed because she used a real photo for a novel and so even if it's brilliant, I won't read it BUT go ahead because you might like it.


message 5: by Karin (last edited May 13, 2018 12:02PM) (new)

Karin | 7470 comments Found another. I haven't met this relative, but my mother has. Ryan Eyford. He wrote White Settler Reserve: New Iceland and the colonization of the Canadian West and I'm going to put this on my tbr.

Never heard of a white reserve? Here's the book's description



In 1875, the Canadian government created a reserve for Icelandic immigrants on the southwest shore of Lake Winnipeg. Hoping for a better life in Canada, many of the New Iceland colonists found only hardship, disappointment, or death. Those who survived scurvy and smallpox faced crop failure, internal dissension, and severe flooding that nearly ended the project only six years after it had begun.This innovative book looks beyond the experiences of these Icelandic immigrants to understand the context into which their reserve fits within the history of settler colonialism.

Ryan Eyford reveals that the timing and location of the Icelandic settlement was not accidental. New Iceland was one of several land reserves created for Europeans by the Canadian government in the late nineteenth century. Canadian leaders hoped that group settlements of immigrants on Indigenous lands would help realize their ambitious plans for western expansion.

By juxtaposing the Icelanders' experiences with those of the Cree, Ojibwe, and Metis people they displaced, Eyford makes clear the connections between immigrant resettlement and Indigenous displacement. By analyzing themes such as race, land, health, and governance, he draws out the tensions that punctuated the process of colonization in western Canada and situates the region within the global history of colonialism.


BTW the Canadian government also moved some Innuit up to Ellesmere island and other areas to claim the land for Canada. BTW My mother grew up in that area, although most of her family came later than 1875.


message 6: by Amy (new)

Amy | 9353 comments My father wrote a book called from Bronx to Broadway. And of course, my brother and I are mentioned in it. Similar to that, we also have a very big connection to John Denver‘s autobiography, which might have been called Take Me Home. He was a close personal friend, and my father built his career and made him famous. Later became a Broadway producer, as the title might suggest. And it’s because of John’s music and success that my father also became successful. They were best friends. I guess I would also add, that through my father’s connections with John Denver, there was a book written by John Augustine, about 10 or 12 celebrities who epitomized a certain trait he admired. He picked my father as the only unknown and dedicated the chapter on character to him. Now that I think about it there are a couple of books out there in the What is... series, authored by Lexie Brockway Potamkin, and my quotes are in two or three of them, even though I’m not famous. Definitely my quoteis in what is spirit? My parents are also close personal friends with the Jampolsky’s. Jerry Jampolsky and Diane Cirincione were leaders in the field of peace and healing in the 70’s. Along with Leo Buscaglua and Depalma Chopra. They still write tons of books on attitudinal healing. They are close personal friends in our lives. Other than that, and that’s quite a lot nothing else springs to mind.


message 7: by Jason (new)

Jason Oliver | 2098 comments Karin wrote: "Sure, my mother's ancestors (and so mine) show up in the Icelandic Sagas, and we are descended (more than once) from the author Snorri Sturluson. One of his works was used as a poetr..."

Karen, interesting about Snori Sturluson. I just read The Prose Edda which was written or at the very least, composed by Snori.

Have you ever visited Iceland to learn more?


message 8: by Jason (new)

Jason Oliver | 2098 comments Amy wrote: "My father wrote a book called from Bronx to Broadway. And of course, my brother and I are mentioned in it. Similar to that, we also have a very big connection to John Denver‘s autobiography, which ..."

Wow Amy. You are quoted in a book. I think that does make you famous. haha. How did your dad get the gig with John Denver?.....I might just read the book.


message 9: by Jason (new)

Jason Oliver | 2098 comments So I just learned about my connection to a book.

I learned about 6 month ago that my great grandmother (died in 1989 when I was 1) grew up on Daufuskie Island off the coast of North Carolina, near Hilton Head.

Daufuskie Island has a rough history. English Colonists battled the Yemassee Indians in the early 1700s, giving part of the island the name Bloody Point. Then, after the Revolutionary War, the plantation era started. 12 Plantations were started and the majority of the population were slaves. After the Civil War and the abolition of slavery, oystering became the main industy. Many of the white people left the island, leaving the slaves and their decendants, known as Gulla.

I am still learning the details as my grandfather has passed and I can't learn all this from him, but my great-grandmother, born in 1911, grew up on the island. Her family is one of the few while people that were not plantation owners. I still do not know how her family, the Palmers, settled on the island or when, but there was a Captain John Palmer in the 1700s that fought the Yemassee Indians.

My great-grandmothers sister married a wealthy plantation owner, Hinson White. This past week, I was able to visit the island. Hinson White's house still stands and can be rented on airbnb. I also found Hinson White's grave. (My great-grandmother's sister divorced Hinson and left the island. Not sure why or when.)

While on the Island, I was recommended An Island Named Daufuskie, which mentions my great-grandmother, her sister Agnes, Hinson, and their children all with pictures. I also learned, Agnes and Hinson's daughter, Ida, was a great contributor to the book with pictures. I also have never met Ida and she had already died. I look forward to going back to the island and learning more and reading An Island Named Daufuskie.


message 10: by Kszr (new)

Kszr | 172 comments If I am directly in a book, it is about technical analysis investing - I was interviewed and had a model considered for inclusion in the book. Never looked it up to see if it made it.

I have always had fun reading about places I know. Middlesex, based in Detroit, referenced real places, including the house they purchased in Gross Pointe and the Greek Coney Dog empires that still exist (Lafeyette vs. American Coney is an age old question downtown). Marge Piercy's Braided Lives also brought up both Detroit and Ann Arbor places that were familiar.

The most fun for me, however, is reading the Nick Adam's stories by Ernest Hemingway. Horton's Bay General Store really exists - on rainy days at camp we used to walk there! Hemingway's property neighbored the camp.


message 11: by JoLene (new)

JoLene (trvl2mtns) | 1532 comments Wow, super interesting. I have no such connections. My dad did write a book related to Louisiana state taxes which I never read (I was in high school).

I grew up in New Orleans and now have lived in the San Francisco Bay Area for many years. There are a lot of books set in these places — sometimes well done and sometimes not. I did got to high school with Delfeayo Marsalis ( younger brother to Wynton and Branford) and Wendell Pierce (actor).


message 12: by Jason (new)

Jason Oliver | 2098 comments JoLene wrote: "Wow, super interesting. I have no such connections. My dad did write a book related to Louisiana state taxes which I never read (I was in high school).

I grew up in New Orleans and now have lived..."


Hey your dad wrote a book. That counts as a connection.


message 13: by Amy (new)

Amy | 9353 comments Now that I think about it, my thyroid doctor wrote an entire chapter on functional medicine's approach to thyroid treatment, on infertility, and I was his central case. It took me a long time to get pregnant with my first child, and I worked with him during that time. I joked with him for years that he got me pregnant and was responsible for all my children. I am his central case for that condition. He passed away last summer, and my close friend took over his practice.


message 14: by Kszr (new)

Kszr | 172 comments Amy - if that is where you are going, I am sure I am referenced somewhere in my sister's publishings about sibling pairs.....just not named.


message 15: by Amy (new)

Amy | 9353 comments That would be fascinating- to read your sisters work about siblings, and hear how she sees you and the dynamic. I bet that spurred tons of conversation.


message 16: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 6400 comments María, Daughter of Immigrants by Maria Antonietta Berriozabal María, Daughter of Immigrants by Maria Antonietta Berriozabal

My mother was a mentor to Maria. When she was writing her book, Maria asked me if she could use a photo I had taken of her and my mother in her book. I said, "Of course, as long as you give me credit." I was really joking about the credit, but when the book was published she DID credit me on the photo.

Four pages of the book are devoted to my mother. It came out while she was still living but I didn't read it until a couple of years after Mom passed away.

==============

In a less specific way, Cormac McCarthy's All the Pretty Horses, the early parts of Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry, and Laura Esquivel's Like Water for Chocolate are all set in the border area between Texas and Mexico. My family hails from those parts and I really could picture the landscape in each of these novels ... made me feel I was part of the story in ways that other books just don't do.


message 17: by Amy (new)

Amy | 9353 comments Forgot to mention the thousands and thousands of books that take place in Boston and it suburbs. But most specifically defending Jacob takes place in the woods of cold Springs Park, which is in my specific town outside of Boston, and those woods are in the back of my house. That’s my neighborhood. Cold Springs Park where the woods connect most of that Township together.


message 18: by Kszr (new)

Kszr | 172 comments Amy wrote: "That would be fascinating- to read your sisters work about siblings, and hear how she sees you and the dynamic. I bet that spurred tons of conversation."

It spurred something ;-)


message 19: by Amy (new)

Amy | 9353 comments K, Someday I would love to hear more. Also as a note for you, Thinking about doing the hearts invisible furies for the next impromptu book club. Like this summer. If you want to come find us near cold Springs Park - lol.


message 20: by Idit (new)

Idit | 1028 comments I can’t think of anyone I know that inspired a story or is in a story (not counting non-fiction)
But:
I had a bottle of ketchup in the fridge which my mum stole and gave to an illustrator or a children book that needed to illustrate one. So my bottle of ketchup is in a book :-)


message 21: by Kszr (new)

Kszr | 172 comments Amy wrote: "K, Someday I would love to hear more. Also as a note for you, Thinking about doing the hearts invisible furies for the next impromptu book club. Like this summer. If you want to come find us near c..."

Would love to! You doing ok with planning?


message 22: by Jason (new)

Jason Oliver | 2098 comments Idit, that's a really unique story.


message 23: by Jason (new)

Jason Oliver | 2098 comments This is such a coincidence. Today while delivering mail, I met a published author. Here is her page on goodreads. https://www.goodreads.com/author/show...

Not my kind of story. I stay away from paranormal, but I thought I'd share. I was invited to stop in one day.


message 24: by LibraryCin (new)

LibraryCin | 9068 comments Idit wrote: "I had a bottle of ketchup in the fridge which my mum stole and gave to an illustrator or a children book that needed to illustrate one. So my bottle of ketchup is in a book :-) ..."

LOL!


message 25: by Karin (new)

Karin | 7470 comments Jason wrote: "Karin wrote: "Sure, my mother's ancestors (and so mine) show up in the Icelandic Sagas, and we are descended (more than once) from the author Snorri Sturluson. One of his works was u..."

The Prose Edda is the one that was used as a poetry textbook for about 600 years. I read that in a couple of biographies about him. He is also considered one of the two greatest historians of the middle ages (scholars disagree as to who is the greatest and who is the second greatest). I believe he also wrote a saga, but my memory is rusty.

In addition he was a chieftain and also served a number of terms as the Law Speaker, which means he had the entire Icelandic code of law memorized, such as it was at the time.

No, I haven't been to Iceland, although it's been on my bucket list for years. Well, I don't have a bucket list, but I have wanted to go. However, now that I know how the water reeks of sulphur in most places it's put a damper on that for the moment. One of my cousins is now a citizen, though.


message 26: by Karin (new)

Karin | 7470 comments Amy wrote: "My father wrote a book called from Bronx to Broadway. And of course, my brother and I are mentioned in it. Similar to that, we also have a very big connection to John Denver‘s autobiography, which ..."

That's cool!


message 27: by Karin (new)

Karin | 7470 comments This is a fun thread. I'm hoping to hear more of this.


message 28: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) One of my favorite authors is a contemporary of mine, from a small town just short drive from the small town in which I was raised. I don't know if I love Michael Perry's philosophical memoirs and essays even more because I feel a resonance of the heart with him or not. But I am glad to have learned that he's gradually becoming more popular outside of Wisconsin as readers learn that much of what he writes about is universally relevant... and is beautifully written.


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