Ultimate Popsugar Reading Challenge discussion

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2018 Weekly Checkins > Week 19: 5/3 - 5/10

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message 1: by Nadine in NY (last edited May 10, 2018 04:38AM) (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 7066 comments Mod
Happy Thursday!! This week both flew by and creeped slowly. One or both of my kids has had a school event EVERY night this week, so that's a lot of rushed dinners and driving back and forth. Plus their dad is out of town for business so we have to feed his cat. This weekend won't be any better.

I was pleased with almost everything I read this week, which is a nice change from a few weeks back when every book was disappointing me. I finished 6 titles, including two books for this challenge, I am now 38/50.

This week I checked out a pile of library books in celebration of Asian and Pacific American Heritage month. So far I've finished:

Trade Me by Courtney Milan - this was a lot of fun, it had been a while since I'd read a romance novel and it was a delight to just sort of check my brain.

I enjoyed that book so much that I continued on with the freebie short: The Year of the Crocodile, which follows the same characters eleven months later. It was free and a fast read and not worth even that small bit of time I spent reading. Two thumbs down!

Engine Empire: Poems by Cathy Park Hong - this was intense and quite different. 5 stars.


I also read:

Fingersmith by Sarah Waters - I've been meaning to read this book for a few years now, this year I put it on my list of books I HAVE to read this year; it's also on the 1001 list. I don't generally read or enjoy slow, wordy, Victorian-esque books like this, but this one grabbed me quite by surprise. 5 stars. I used this for "body part in the title" in AtY.

Macbeth by William Shakespeare - I'd never read this and wanted to read the original before reading Jo Nesbø's new version. The Gutenberg version is a little TOO loyal to the original folio, but I managed to enjoy this despite the crazy spelling. (I don't just mean "againe " in place of "again" or "murtherers" instead of "murderers," but really inventive stuff like: "liuer" and "seauenth" and "vpon " and "captiuitie" and "but in a syue ile thither sayle" and "ile giue thee a winde." I'm still not sure what a syue is.). I checked off "book mentioned in another book" with this.

The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes - wow, this was gripping! Starts out a little confusing but just keep reading and it all comes together. Not for the faint of heart! (Also, a dog dies.) I read this for "time travel" but it would also work for "villain."


Question of the Week!

By (slightly) popular demand: who are some of the worst mothers in literature?


Without putting much thought into it, I'm going to just mention two: Corrine in Flowers in the Attic, because whoa the hits just keep coming with her. (Corrine's mother, Olivia, is memorably awful too.)

And Mrs Sucksby in Fingersmith. I don't want to say too much about Mrs Sucksby, because learning about her is part of the story, so just suffice to say that she sucks, but she works hard to redeem herself. But, still, she sucks.

So, on that note, happy Mother's Day to my American friends!! ;-)


message 2: by El (last edited May 10, 2018 05:52AM) (new)

El | 195 comments 32/50

Finished:
The Goose Girl by Shannon Hale for book with an animal in the title.

The Time Machine by H.G. Wells for a book about time travel.

Currently reading:
Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood

QOTW:
The ones from the books I read recently that come to mind are Elizabeth Leefolt from The Help and Ani's mother from The Goose Girl.


message 3: by Dani (new)

Dani Weyand | 303 comments Hello from a pleasant and warm Columbus! I have a ton of short and sweet titles TBR in my pile that I just haven’t gotten around to. It’s been a helluv’a week. Without getting too too personal, I’m dealing with some nonsense custody stuff, things went pretty well though and it’ll all be wrapped up by the end of the month I pray. So I just can’t really focus on anything. Also I can’t stop watching the new Childish Gambino video and it’s sucking up all my time lol.

State of Wonder- Another Ann Patchett popped in my account from my holds list. It was another title I really enjoyed, and I’m looking forward to more of her books. The more I read, the more I thought “this all sounds vaguely familiar…” I realized, and confirmed, that this is the book Elizabeth Gilbert mentioned she almost wrote in Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear, if you’ve read that book. I like it when my bookish worlds meet unexpectedly. State of Wonder did an excellent job at making me feel really uncomfortable and I’d sometimes have to remind myself that I’m home in my air conditioned bedroom NOT in the Amazon uncomfortably close to cannibals and malaria. But overall I’d totally recommend this, it was a quick easy read for me.

The Monsters of Templeton- Lauren Groff is another author that I’ve been wanting to read thoroughly. Like Patchett’s Commonwealth, Groff’s Fates and Furies really stuck out to me last year. Monsters is a fiction based on legends of the author’s hometown. Fun and engaging, a bit too into mild incest (lots of distant cousins marrying distant cousins but I guess that’s what happens in a small town lol). This was a lot less heavy (emotionally) than Fates and Furies.

My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry - I guess this is when the stress of the week started to kick, or I just didn’t enjoy this at all. I honestly couldn’t even tell you what was really going on this book. Were there elements of magic or was it all imagination? I didn’t really get who half the characters were. Idk, I wish there was a detailed summary for me to try to piece together the parts I didn’t get.

Britt-Marie Was Here- this was already in my account so I went with it and like the previous book I have no idea. I’d read and then realize I had no idea what I just read. Something would happen to a character and I wouldn’t know who they were talking about. I really loved A Man Called Ove so I’m bummed that these last two did absolutely nothing for me. Hopefully I can revisit them soon unless someone here can confirm that these were boring and hard to pay attention to.

So this brings me to 32/49; 0/10 with 77 books read this year.

QOTW: Catelyn Stark. She’s the basically only character in that whole GoT world that I just hate completely.


message 4: by Christine (last edited May 10, 2018 04:54AM) (new)

Christine McCann | 491 comments Yay, the check-in! Momentarily pulling myself out of a perpetual loop of watching "This Is America" and reading analyses of it, to participate.

This week I finished The Tenant of Wildfell Hall - Female author with male pseudonym, and Bitch Planet, Vol. 1: Extraordinary Machine - Book set on another planet (and thank you Nadine for the recommendation!)

These are very strange, yet completely appropriate to read back-to-back. If I were still in college, I would have a term paper all set up for me! Helen is terribly oppressed, and she willingly takes on a lot of roles that The Patriarchy from BP would endorse. But I have to think that she'd be found Non-Compliant and sent to the penal colony right along with the sluts and fat chicks. In fact, one cover in Bitch Planet makes clear that compliance is about being a happy medium that's pleasing to men - being too heretical OR too religious marks you as an NC.

Anyway, individually I loved both stories. In The Tenant of Wildfell Hall Helen sometimes seems a little too insufferably giving and patient, but her backbone and her passion keep her mostly relatable. The romantic mixups and delays toward the end were my only real complaint - it took way too long and was too preposterous. I wanted to slap Gilbert HARD.

As for Bitch Planet, Vol. 1: Extraordinary Machine, it was marvelous. One minute you're shaking your head at how over-the-top the satire is; the next you're like, "Wait, {insert current-day news story that exemplifies the point in BP] just happened this week . . ."

Up next:

John Scalzi's Head On - Book about a sport - just released and my number came up at the library. I'll confess now that I'll probably buy the audio book when my credit comes around next week - loved hearing the reading of the first one (I won't tell anything about the narrator and ruin the fun).

ETA:

Dani wrote: "Without getting too too personal, I’m dealing with some nonsense custody stuff, things went pretty well though and it’ll all be wrapped up by the end of the month I pray. So I just can’t really focus on anything. Also I can’t stop watching the new Childish Gambino video and it’s sucking up all my time lol."

I'm glad things are reaching closure in a good way - best wishes. And it's good to know others are also ensconced in a Gambino-vortex!


message 5: by Anabell (new)

Anabell | 354 comments I finally made it to a check-in on a thursday...

Been busy with work for so many weeks now but at least this week I finally managed to read some books and finish them which brings me to 32/52.

Finished this week:
Stalking Jack the Ripper
Animal Farm

Currently (still) reading:
Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch
Women Who Run with the Wolves
Female Nomad and Friends: Tales of Breaking Free and Breaking Bread Around the World

QOTW: I really liked this question and last week I had several in mind but for the life of me I can not remember any at the moment... Will update later if my brain starts to work again. It has gone on a long weekend ;-)


message 6: by Tricia (new)

Tricia | 121 comments Hello from Brisbane Australia, It looks like winter is on the way with a cold snap coming.

This week I finished:
The Eye of the Storm (a book with a weather element in the title) I know the author won a Nobel Prize for literature, but honestly, I found this book a bit dull. I also hated all of the characters. Maybe there is some deeper meaning that I missed.

The Forgotten Garden (book by a local author) I really liked this one. I have read a few by this author and I have enjoyed them.

The Outside (prompt from 2016 challenge – a dystopian novel). This is a YA vampire novel set in an Amish community. I enjoyed it.

Barbed Wire and Cherry Blossoms (a book from an author with a different ethnicity to you). This author identifies as Australian Aboriginal. I didn’t know much about the event the book is about and thought it was an interesting read from that perspective.

Night's Daughter (a book with the time of day in the title). I read a really good book by this author last year so I was looking forward to reading this. I was disappointed in this one as it was not anywhere as good as the previous one

A Stitch in Time (a book about time travel). This was a cute no-brainer romance with time travel. It was fun and easy to read.

Currently reading:

True History of the Kelly Gang (A book on a villain or anti-hero). In Australia, when you think of anti-heros, Ned Kelly is the one that comes most to mind.

The Bourne Identity ( a book set in the decade you were born – 1970s) This is not a genre I read a lot but I am really enjoying this.

QOTW:
None come to mind but I will second Corrine from Flowers in the Attic. She was very nasty.


message 7: by Brooke (new)

Brooke | 273 comments Hi everyone! Summer has hit Dallas…we have been in the 90’s all week, and I think the extreme temperature fluctuations are done until fall. I learned this week that Dallas has an average of 103 days/year at 90 degrees or above. Say what??!! That sounds like a lot to me. This is my 7th summer here, and I was fine until I learned that tidbit. Now I’m absolutely dreading the months to come.

I had a pretty good reading week thanks to audiobooks on a road trip and a few quick reads. I read 2 that I’m counting for Popsugar, so I’m at 28/52 for this challenge. I am currently 31/52 for the Around the Year challenge.

Books I finished:
For Popsugar
I'll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer by Michelle McNamera for a book of true crime (2). I found this interesting, although not as in depth as I expected. I did appreciate the sideline stories and McNamera’s personal story, though. It is unfortunate that McNamera died before an arrest in the case, but at least her family knows that all of her research and hard work played a role in the recent arrest.

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz for a book with a LGBTQ+ protagonist (12). This was a great coming-of-age story of two friends, both trying to figure out who they are. This would have been a great John Hughes movie. (Those of us who grew up in the 80’s know what I am talking about! He was the teen angst master.) The book is real, heartbreaking, funny, innocent and sweet.

For other challenges
Trespassing by Brandi Reeds. This was a thriller that kept me on the edge of my seat wanting more. Every chapter raised another question about the overall mystery. I read it in 2 sittings because I had to know what happened. This was Reeds’ debut novel, so I’ll be watching for her next one.

Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar--Your Brain's Silent Killers by David Perlmutter. I learned a few new things, but mostly this just reinforced what I’ve learned over the last 20 years from paying attention to how various foods affect my body and working in the food industry. This program has merits, but I am a firm believer in the fact that there is no one-size-fits-all approach for everyone. Chemistry, DNA and environment are different, and all of those things can have a big effect on what foods work for you.

A Stranger in the House by Shari Lapena. I was disappointed in this one. I read a lot of mysteries/thrillers and know that there will always be unrealistic coincidences to help the story along, but the overall plot was too implausible for me. I kept waiting for it to get better, but it went farther and farther off the rails.

I am currently reading:
Tracks: A Woman's Solo Trek Across 1700 Miles of Australian Outback by Robyn Davidson - I started this a few weeks ago and couldn't get into it. I'm going to pick it up again tonight and see if the break helped or if I should read something else.
The Rules Do Not Apply by Ariel Levy - I should finish this today at some point.

QOTW: There have been so many bad moms! In a lot of the thrillers I've read either the MC is a mother who is awful or the MC's mother was awful which turned her into a mess. Other than moms in thrillers, the mother of Odd Thomas is pretty darn awful.


message 8: by Brittany (last edited May 10, 2018 05:15AM) (new)

Brittany | 187 comments Hi All!

A very lovely, warm week over here in the Gulf this past week. So I only read 1 book over the previous 2 weeks but I have to say, I made up for that this week as I finished 8 books. I'm now at 35/50

To start I read Heat Wave which was just some light silly reading. I wasn't expecting a ton out of this one (as it is linked to the TV show Castle) but it was actually rather enjoyable to read. There were definitely things that weren't amazing but I was looking for light, and that's what I got. This one can fulfill 24. A book with a weather element in the title (but I already finished off earlier with Sunshine).

Next I read, Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers for the Microhistory prompt. I thought this book was great! So interesting, and the author was so funny. I would really recommend this one if anyone is still looking to knock this prompt off. One note, if you are squeamish at all then I do not recommend this.

Since We Fell is a book that I had previously started and then set down as it just wasn't moving along quick enough. I picked it back up finally and finished it and the second half of the book was much more interesting than the first. I just honestly do not understand why the author included all of the first half of this story. It didn't really relate to the actual plot. This was for the book a stranger was reading prompt.

Turtles All the Way Down was for the Mental Health prompt and is also the book of the month. I actually expected more from this book. I like what the author was attempting to do but the main 'plot' behind the character development was just weird and kind of boring. I did think the portrayal of OCD/anxiety was well written though. I thought the thoughts were well written and you did get an actual feel for what someone with these kinds of issues deals with.

First Grave on the Right was another fluffy one, just for me. It's about a woman who is a grim reaper but in this story that means that she can see dead people and helps them pass to the other side. She also solves murder mysteries. It was silly and fun and just want I was expecting.

The Four Tendencies: The Indispensable Personality Profiles That Reveal How to Make Your Life Better I had heard of on a podcast. I actually think the author may be on to something with this. Her premise seems logical and well written but in the back there was a grand total of 7 scientific resources and it seems like the main one was a 4 minute survey she did with the help of a surveying company. I just couldn't give this one a good rating based on the lack of scientific evidence. I'd be happy to read a follow-up book with more resources though.

Murder in an Irish Churchyard was an audiobook that I had started and abandoned. It was just about to return so I figured I might as well finish it off. This is the third in a series and the main character got a bit more annoying than normal in the beginning but thankfully when I continued listening that lessened. I think I'm done with this series though even if the author comes out with more.

A Man Called Ove I read for the Death/Grief prompt and I have to say, I just wasn't that crazy about it. I know that people have generally loved this story but I thought the plot line just moved a bit slow. I think I would have enjoyed it more if it had been laid out in chronological order or was just the present day storyline. I did love Ove's character though and I will admit to having cried during one point.

QOTW: Last year I read The Light of the Fireflies. It's told from the point of view of a young boy and you find that he and his family live in this house and he has never been outdoors. The family never leave this house and throughout the story you find out why and where this house is. I don't want to give anything away in case anyone wants to read it but I got so mad at the mother in this story. She seemed so caring at points but it was one of those things where you reflect back and come to the conclusion she was really not a great mother.


message 9: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1325 comments The UK is still in shock over constant sun for the whole bank holiday weekend! Between walks, BBQ and beach I did finish a couple of books and I'm pretty relieved to have ticked off the true crime prompt which I really wasn't looking forward to.

I finished Into the Drowning Deep for a book set at sea and I loved it. The mix of science and horror elements reminded me a bit of Jurassic Park, but with killer "mermaids" rather than dinosaurs. Makes you think about what could be lurking in the depths of the ocean...

I also read I'll Be Gone in the Dark for true crime (works for both Popsugar and Read Harder). You can tell the book was unfinished and I kinda regretted picking up something about violent crime. I preferred the parts which were more memoir or about the cold case investigation process. If I ever have to read true crime again, I'm going for theft or fraud or something!

I've found that I can't seem to read two non-fiction books at once, so Other Minds: The Octopus, the Sea, and the Deep Origins of Consciousness has been on hold whilst I got through my true crime read. Hopefully I'll get back to reading it in the evenings now.

Because I now need something light-hearted I'm reading SLAY which is about a demon-slaying boy band.

PS 20/50
GR 39/100

QOTW:
Maybe Mrs Coulter from His Dark Materials, although she does redeem herself somewhat. I think it's the monkey that exposes her nature the most. I also hated all the parents in Gather the Daughters for letting what happens happen.


message 10: by Anne (new)

Anne Happy Thursday! 33 of 50 down.

Completed:

The Shack by William Paul Young – My mother, after what we call The Nightingale incident, asks me to read anything she is tempted to read so she doesn’t mistakenly take on something that causes nightmares. I’m pretty religious and had been contemplating reading this for some time and she was lent a copy from a church friend. Well, now I can say that I read it. I also didn’t enjoy it. It tried a little too hard to be unsettling and ended up pushing a very specific religious bent. Mom won’t be reading it; but I knew that by the time the daughter was abducted by a possible serial killer. I used this for grief #10.

The Man Who Loved Books Too Much: The True Story of a Thief, a Detective, and a World of Literary Obsession, my #39 Bookstore/ Library, by Allison Hoover Bartlett could also be a True Crime for those that don’t like blood. Fascinating read into the world a literary forgeries and a bit of a psychological textbook.

Through Waters Deep by Sarah Sundin. I’m playing around with Overdrive and don’t have a lot of options. It’s a Christian romance, not my normal true crime or psychological thriller, but so charming, I don’t care. Look – unabashed references to going to church and the Bible!

Long Time Gone by J A Jance, my #11, a female author using a male pseudonym. I had to double check J A Jance’s gender! She truly mastered a male cop’s voice in the Dt. J P Beaumont book I read!

Currently reading:
In the Bleak Midwinter, by Julia Spencer-Fleming, for my song lyrics #28
And for fun, Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The Battle That Shaped America's Destiny.
As well as Anchor in the Storm

QOTW - Worst mothers in literature
Has anyone here read Chevy Stevens Still Missing? Yikes! Most of Jane Austen Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility and Charles Dickens parental figures were problematic. And let's not forget that someone was pregnant at the end of Gone Girl


message 11: by Johanna (last edited May 10, 2018 05:47AM) (new)

Johanna Ellwood (jpellwood) | 234 comments 29/52

I have not completed any books this week - we had a band trip to Williamsburg Busch Gardens which then segued into a boy scout biking trip along the colonial parkway. We were exhausted when we got back and I have been trying to catch up with laundry and housework. But I have been plugging along with a few books.

On my nightstand:
I am making my way through The Time Traveler's Wife - finally getting into it.

Does anyone else get the free Kindle book each month from Prime? I downloaded A Marriage in Dog Years: A Memoir - I think it will fit perfectly for the book about death or grief (I think it will probably have both in it.)

QOTW: Ooooh. I think this one is harder. I picked Ms. Honey from Matilda last week, only because her own mother would make this list. And how about Mrs. Lisbon from The Virgin Suicides?


message 12: by Taylor (new)

Taylor | 178 comments Happy Thursday! This week flew by for me as I've been battling a bad stomach bug and was out of work for two days! I got a lot of reading done but unfortunately did not finish anything.

Currently reading:

Not Afraid of the Fall - I love travel memoirs and a couple travelling to so many placed definitely appealed to me...however, it's been a huge disappointment. I'm trying to wait until the end to form a solid opinion. Has anyone else read this book? I'm interested to hear other peoples opinions who were NOT given an advanced copy from the publisher (most of the reviews on GR are these people and considering how high all their opinions were I just find it a little suspect).

Every Falling Star: The True Story of How I Survived and Escaped North Korea - just started, no opinion yet

Turtles All the Way Down - trying to get back into it after a brief hiatus

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks - this is my listen-while-I-walk book so it's going a little slowly for me but I am enjoying it. Every time I start to get bored with the science mumbo-jumbo she switches to the more biographical portions which I really appreciate.

Finished:

Truly Madly Guilty - a bad rip-off of Big Little Lies. The huge buildup of the entire book was resolved in a couple pages and there were still over 100 pages to go!! Slow moving, anti-climactic, too familiar.

QOTW:

I looked back at the books I read this year just as a starting point and the only one who stood out to me was Jeanette Wall's mother from The Glass Castle. I know there are worse mothers out there but she consistently put her WANTS above her children's NEEDS and never quite seemed to understand what was so bad about that.


message 13: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 7066 comments Mod
I've been mesmerized by Childish Gambino too!!! That video is ... I don't even know what the word is, but whoa.


message 14: by Megan (new)

Megan (mghrt06) | 542 comments I finished one (awful) book and started another.

Finished - The End of Everything. The only redeeming quality of this book was that it was not too long. And I kept reading because of the mystery part and even that angered me. Using it for Author with the same name as me.

Started The Bookshop on the Corner for involving bookstore or library. I'm enjoying this. It's cute and a light read.

I've already got my next two reads loaded on my kindle!

14 Regular, 2 Advanced, 4 Non Challenge.


message 15: by Cendaquenta (last edited May 10, 2018 06:10AM) (new)

Cendaquenta | 697 comments Nadine wrote: "Macbeth by William Shakespeare - I'd never read this and wanted to read the original before reading Jo Nesbø's new version. The Gutenberg version is a little TOO loyal to the original folio, but I managed to enjoy this despite the crazy spelling. (I don't just mean "againe " in place of "again" or "murtherers" instead of "murderers," but really inventive stuff like: "liuer" and "seauenth" and "vpon " and "captiuitie" and "but in a syue ile thither sayle" and "ile giue thee a winde." I'm still not sure what a syue is.). I checked off "book mentioned in another book" with this."

"ile giue thee a winde."

... That's not inventive, that's just Scottish. :p

This week was a decompression-after-holiday break, so haven't done much, which has resulted in my sleep pattern cartwheeling - I woke up at almost midnight last night and have been awake ever since (it's currently 2 p.m. British time). x_x
Next few days are going to be more interesting though - I'm planning to see Infinity War at the weekend and Monday is the She Reads Comics night at Glasgow Forbidden Planet. Perhaps this time I will talk!

Books finished this week:

The Gloaming - New fave! Gave it 5 stars. REMOTE SCOTTISH ISLAND. MAGICAL REALISM. MERMAIDS. LADIES IN LOVE. And all the chapter titles are Scots words! <3

The Beginning of the World in the Middle of the Night - Neat little collection. Some of the imagery will stay with me for a while.

Brick Lane - The book is decent, but not for me. I think perhaps I read it in a too-disjointed fashion - snippets at a time in between other books, usually with a day or so in between of just not picking it up at all. It may also be the case that at my current point in life, I'm not clicking with books heavily focused on relationships, marriage and motherhood. I just can't relate. Had a similar problem with Stay with Me last year - I'll see how I feel about them in a decade...

Brazen: Rebel Ladies Who Rocked the World - Book of inspirational ladies. There's been a lot of those around lately and this unfortunately doesn't stand out from the crowd very much. The art is very good though.

I don't think any of them fit into Popsugar, although I'd be grateful for suggestions of prompts to slot them into. (Or Read Harder tasks, as I'm doing that challenge too.)

Currently reading Circe, only 60-some pages in but impressed with it so far.

QOTW: Thinking of just what I've read recently...
Circe's mum is... not good.
Jack and Jill's mother and father from Down Among the Sticks and Bones - these parents are the epitome of forcing a square peg into a round hole and they damage their daughters for life by doing so. And (view spoiler)
The mother from Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine
Leonie from Sing, Unburied, Sing - she's a POV character in the book and she has problems which I can sympathize with up to a point, but she is an absolutely TERRIBLE parent. As in, takes a young teen and a toddler on a several-day drive up and down the state of Mississippi and doesn't bring or buy water. Her son drinks falling rain out of desperation. And then there's the drugs (not a spoiler, it's in the description of the book). Yeah.
And if we're venturing into mother-figures, Aunt Reed from Jane Eyre is a monumentally awful person.


message 16: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 7066 comments Mod
Cendaquenta wrote: "... The Gloaming - New fave! Gave it 5 stars. REMOTE SCOTTISH ISLAND. MAGICAL REALISM. MERMAIDS. LADIES IN LOVE. And all the chapter titles are Scots words! <3 ..."


Gahhhh I loved The Gracekeepers and I NO idea she'd written another book!!! Goodreads, why didn't you tell me???? Adding it to TBR now!


message 17: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1325 comments Cendaquenta wrote: "I don't think any of them fit into Popsugar, although I'd be grateful for suggestions of prompts to slot them into. (Or Read Harder tasks, as I'm doing that challenge too.)"

Have you already done time of day because both gloaming and middle of the night would fit?


message 18: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 7066 comments Mod
Unauthorized Cinnamon wrote: "... These are very strange, yet completely appropriate to read back-to-back. If I were still in college, I would have a term paper all set up for me! Helen is terribly oppressed, and she willingly takes on a lot of roles that The Patriarchy from BP would endorse. But I have to think that she'd be found Non-Compliant and sent to the penal colony right along with the sluts and fat chicks ..."

That is an absolutely fascinating comparison!!! I've read both books and loved both, but never thought to consider one in terms of that other. I love it!


message 19: by Cendaquenta (new)

Cendaquenta | 697 comments Nadine wrote: "Cendaquenta wrote: "Gahhhh I loved The Gracekeepers and I NO idea she'd written another book!!! Goodreads, why didn't you tell me???? Adding it to TBR now! "

it's a prequel to Gracekeepers and it's actually better


message 20: by Carol (new)

Carol Roote | 117 comments Good morning!

Currently: Regular: 20/40; Advanced: 1/10
Half way there!!

This week, I was sick in bed for a couple of days, so it was a good week for reading. Had to take my mind off of how miserable I was.

Finished:

Sorry to Disrupt the Peace for a face-to-face book club. Doesn't seem to fit anywhere, except mental health, which I've already read. It was a very different book. The book has an ironic humor and quirkiness that I enjoyed. The main character is just a little bit off, but that was what made it interesting. 3/5

The Catcher in the Rye My daughter made me read this because she loved it. I didn't love it, but I did like it and I can see why it especially appeals to young people. 3/5 I'm using it for
#9 A book about a villain or anithero

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking It was hard for me to get into this book and I kept putting it aside, but then I listened to the audio and it was fabulous! This book really helped me understand my husband, my daughter, and myself much better. I feel much less guilty now for all the time I've spent reading for this challenge. :) 5/5 Using it for the prompt:
#35 A past Goodreads Choice Awards winner (2012 Non-fiction)

Next Up:

Turtles All the Way Down for
#26 A book with an animal in the title (already read the mental health prompt)

And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer Have this on audio from the library for
#8 A book with a time of day in the title

QOTW:
This is just as tough as last week's QOTW, because there are so many!! I'm going with Petal in The Shipping News


message 21: by Diane (new)

Diane  Lupton | 136 comments Let's see, this week I almost fell of the treadmill due to a lengthy description of what happens to eyes in space and the tests they run on them. That was from my audiobook Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery. I have an eye phobia that actually makes me pass out but don't worry, I powered through. I could have also done without the how to dissect a mouse in space part as well.

I will be starting Wake in Winter as my next read. I think it will fall in the set somewhere that fascinates you prompt. I have always been fascinated with Russia. The culture and architecture but not the politics.

QOTW
The two "bad" moms that came to mind are from books but are also actual people. The first one was the mother from A Child Called "It" which I read earlier this year. The second was Joan Crawford from Mommie Dearest. I can remember my mother refused to let me watch the movie version for years. She said I didn't need to see mothers behaving that way.


message 22: by Jess (new)

Jess Penhallow | 427 comments Short check in this week as I am still plugging away at my long books this month.

I Managed to fit in a picture book though, A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo. I am hoping I won't need to use it for the challenge but if I do it will fulfill the 'received as a gift' prompt as my boyfriend bought be it as a fun present for my birthday. Or maybe for the allegory prompt, is that a stretch? It was a wonderful book, exactly what I expected!

QOTW
The mum from Carrie has to be up there! Also Adora from Sharp Objects.


Nadine wrote: "And Mrs Sucksby in Fingersmith. I don't want to say too much about Mrs Sucksby, because learning about her is part of the story, so just suffice to say that she sucks, but she works hard to redeem herself. But, still, she sucks."

Haha I chose Mrs Sucksby as one of the best mum's because of her redemption arc (view spoiler) She's definitely an antihero though, even at her worst she was difficult to dislike.


message 23: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Rainbow (erainbow) | 25 comments It's been beautiful in Upstate NY this week! I am doing a lot of listening/reading while outside walking or doing yardwork. I didn't check in last week, so I have two weeks worth of books to update here!

Finished:

#26 - Book with animal in the title - The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden. This was out of my comfort zone. I don't usually do YA fantasy, but I loved how much I learned about Russian culture and folklore in this novel. Excited to read the next in the trilogy!

Dear Martin by Nic Stone. I loved this one and read it in a day! It would work great for a book about an issue facing society as it talks about police brutality, racism, etc. It goes hand in hand with other popular titles like The Hate U Give and All American Boys.

If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo. This would work as a book by an LGBT+ author. Another quick but thought provoking read about a trans girl trying to navigate through a new high school and love interest, all while battling the fear of being "discovered."

Leah on the Offbeat by Becky Albertalli. This would work as a book by an LGBT+ author as well. This book is the sequel to Simon vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda, so we get to see some of those beloved characters a year later at the end of their senior year. I recommend it if you loved Simon!

Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell. A cute read about a girl adjusting to "adult life" as a college freshman. It is a bit long, in my opinion, but I enjoyed it.

Currently Reading:

Trying to get more challenge prompts taken care of so...

#13 - Book that is also a stage play or musical - The Color Purple by Alice Walker. This has been on my TBR forever. I'm listening to it AND reading it simultaneously, so I'm flying through it. Riveting read. Definitely recommend! I want to watch the movie so badly now.

A#2 - A cyberpunk book - Ready Player One by Ernest Cline. My husband and I are actually listening to this together, which is awesome since we have very different tastes and seldom read/listen to the same stuff. We're both enjoying it, at about 30% in. It's not my usual genre, but I am getting into it and excited to recommend it to my students!

Current Challenge Progress:
29/40 regular
4/10 advanced
33/50 overall :)

As you can see I've been on a YA rampage lately!! Trying to get some new books into my kiddos hands before summer break sneaks up on us. I am hoping to have more free time this summer (as a teacher) to read longer, more complex adult reads. With that being said, I'm a huge advocate of YA fiction. I think a lot of the texts I've mentioned above tackle VERY complex topics in a thought provoking and respectful way.

QOTW:
It is so hard for me to narrow down just ONE terrible mother in literature. Isn't that so sad?! I feel like I've been so blessed with the best mom and mother figures EVER that it is hard for me to even fathom having a terrible mother.

Ummm... I guess I would have to point out the horrible mother/grandmother in The Roanoke Girls. I read that this year, and she's definitely one for the record books. Without spoilers, let's just say she did the opposite of protect, cherish, and support her daughters and granddaughters. (Didn't love this book because I felt like it was almost unrealistic how terrible this woman was.)

The mother in Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine also gets a huge nomination. She's terrible and root of all of Eleanor's issues. (Great read!)


Raquel (Silver Valkyrie Reads) | 895 comments It's been an interesting week, as I finished up a beach vacation, took the 19 hour drive back with my husband in one day, and have begun to seriously suspect that we have minor mold issues in our house. (Long story, but includes the fact that I probably have a genetic difficulty processing out mold toxins, so even a very minor mold problem could be contributing a lot to my chronic health problems.) In all of that my reading week has been complicated, but I did finish a couple of books.

Finished Reading:
The Dead in Their Vaulted Arches I didn't realize when I started this for my second vacation read that it was a much heavier book than the rest of the series so far. Very good, but wouldn't have been my first pick for relaxing on the beach. Would easily work for the death and grief prompt if I hadn't already filled it.

Humans, Bow Down We listened to this audiobook because we accidentally packed the audiobook of Artemis that I'd checked out of the library for our drive home in my husband's brother's car. So, out of the selection of super popular audiobooks at Cracker Barrel, we picked this. It wasn't great, but the narrator was excellent and it was interesting enough to keep us from getting bored on the 19 hour drive. (I toyed with the idea of counting this for the LGBTQ prompt, but the character in question was minor enough that I'd rather hold out for my planned pick.)

Currently Reading:
Fix, Freeze, Feast: The Delicious, Money-Saving Way to Feed Your Family (Can' get the 2nd edition to show up in my book search at the moment.) I'm about ready to buckle down and just finish this in an afternoon so I can review it for NetGalley.

When God Says "Wait": Navigating Life's Detours and Delays Without Losing Your Faith, Your Friends, or Your Mind Picked this back up to work through it a little more slowly and hopefully not give myself a headache crying this time...

Beastly Bones Started this right near the end of vacation so I've read it in odd starts and chunks. I think I've finally getting into it, but the odd formatting in the e-book didn't help at first. I really enjoyed Jackaby, so I'm glad this one is starting to get interesting too.

Educated: A Memoir I started this hesitantly, then kind of settled in to the story she was telling (with a brief crying patch when she talked about Weaver Ridge, which I'm just old enough to remember). Then just this morning I started to hit the really upsetting parts. (view spoiler)

DNF
I finally gave up on Sophie Scholl and the White Rose. I didn't like the style, and the perspective was sometimes personally irritating, and other times just plain weird, like claiming Deitrich Bonhoeffer was an existentialist. Maybe I'll find some other, easier to read book with the historical details I wanted.

QOTW:
I second the vote for Aunt Reed in Jane Eyre. Even if you don't count her mother-figure status for Jane, she's actually a pretty terrible mother to her biological children as well, just in a different way.


message 25: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) | 242 comments Good morning! On vacation this week and loving it!

I finished 3 books for the challenge this week, putting me at 28/50.

Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore - I found this a little scary at times, but basically an interesting mystery. The characters didn't ring true to me, although I appreciated that the author centered his story on a woman, and I wish there had been more follow-through at the end. This is for an author with the same first or last name as me.

Parnassus on Wheels - Charming story, delightfully written. How much the world (and writing styles!) has changed since this was written in 1907. It's about a horse-drawn, traveling bookstore, so I used it for the prompt that involves a library or bookstore. Really a fun read, it's short, and only 99 cents for the kindle version.

Earthly Remains - I lucked out on this one. I didn't think it fit any prompt for this challenge, but when I finished I realized it fits the book involving a sport prompt as a main character has won a rowing championship and his skill becomes central to the plot. This is the 26th book in the Brunetti series, though, so don't pick it up unless you're familiar with the characters or it won't make much sense. In any case, never read a Commissario Brunetti mystery for the plot or action, or to savor the triumph of justice. This book, like so many others in the series, is a beautifully written tale of Brunetti's reflections on being a policeman in a corrupt system and on the big questions of life itself.

In process:

The Butterfly Mosque: A Young American Woman's Journey to Love and Islam - I'm reading this for another challenge and maybe it will fit a prompt for Popsugar that I haven't already completed, but I don't know yet. I like the author's (G. Willow Wilson) books a lot so decided to read this memoir and so far (almost half done) I'm enjoying it a lot.

Question of the Week
Lots of bad mothers out there, but only two spring to mind. One is the mother in The Glass Castle, who was criminally neglectful. Orders of magnitude better but still bad was Mrs. Bennett in Pride and Prejudice.


message 26: by Johanne (new)

Johanne *the biblionaut* | 1301 comments Cendaquenta wrote: ... I don't think any of them fit into Popsugar, although I'd be grateful for suggestions of prompts to slot them into. (Or Read Harder tasks, as I'm doing that challenge too.).

The Beginning of the World in the Middle of the Night - Neat little collection. Some of the imagery will stay with me for a while.

Well if you haven´t used time of day in the title.

and

Brazen: Rebel Ladies Who Rocked the World - Book of inspirational ladies. There's been a lot of those around lately and this unfortunately doesn't stand out from the crowd very much. The art is very good though.

Feminism maybe?


message 27: by Cendaquenta (new)

Cendaquenta | 697 comments Johanne wrote: "Cendaquenta wrote: ... I don't think any of them fit into Popsugar, although I'd be grateful for suggestions of prompts to slot them into. (Or Read Harder tasks, as I'm doing that challenge too.).
..."


Unfortunately I've already completed both those prompts.


message 28: by Heather (new)

Heather (heathergrace) | 94 comments Good morning from cloudy Baltimore! I drove to a wedding over the weekend, so I had some audiobook time and some waiting around for the evening ceremony time, so I got some reading done!

Finished:
A Princess in Theory and was thoroughly charmed. Now I want to go read Alyssa Cole's historical stuff.

After the Kiss, which is the first Lauren Layne romance to truly underwhelm me, but I liked the world she set up and therefore read the next one in the series, Love the One You're With, which was better (also, song lyrics).

The One That Got Away... a modern Persuasion, apparently? Could've fooled me. Incredibly surface and lacking real emotion or any real connection to the alleged source material. Not a slog but not one I'd recommend.

Currently reading:
Other People's Houses, a Book of the Month pick I'm reading within a couple of months of getting it! 25 pages in and I am hooked by Abbi Waxman's style.

QOTW: The mother in The English Wife was pretty horrible (just going back through what I've read this year). Honorable mention for Sing, Unburied, Sing.


message 29: by Johanne (new)

Johanne *the biblionaut* | 1301 comments Elizabeth wrote: "...As you can see I've been on a YA rampage lately!! Trying to get some new books into my kiddos hands before summer break sneaks up on us. I am hoping to have more free time this summer (as a teacher) to read longer, more complex adult reads. With that being said, I'm a huge advocate of YA fiction. I think a lot of the texts I've mentioned above tackle VERY complex topics in a thought provoking and respectful way...."

I absolutely agree, both in the YA tackling complex topics, and hopefully using the summer for more complex "adult" reading. (I´m a children´s librarian, so that reflects on my reading)


message 30: by Tania (last edited May 10, 2018 10:21AM) (new)

Tania | 600 comments Checking in with 3 books read this week, better than my one book last week!

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J.K. Rowling - the bad part about borrowing digital books from the library is that you can't return them late! I know, you shouldn't return books late, but the first time I checked this one out I only made it halfway through, then had to wait 6 weeks to get it back to read the other half. It didn't fit any of my open Pop Sugar prompts but I used it for another challenge. (Of course, it would work for several prompts including a book of a movie you've already seen, a book with twins, and the next book in a series you've started.)

The Breakup Bible by Melissa Kantor - my niece was cleaning off her bookshelf and I took this one off her hands. I was in the mood for a light read, and despite the title it is just that (at least if you aren't a teenager, lol). Really loved this one. Another that didn't fit PS for me though if your favorite color is pink, you can absolutely use it for that prompt as the cover is bright pink (edited to say this is fake news, since I just realized the prompt is color in the title not color of the cover, sorry!), or for an alliteration in a title, but I used it for another challenge.

Bon Jovi: When We Were Beautiful by Jon Bon Jovi (and Phil Griffin) - my Mom gave me this book as a gift knowing my love for Bon Jovi (but I already filled the borrowed/gift prompt); I used it for a nonfiction challenge (Art & Music prompt). It's a visually stunning book, content is interesting if not in-depth or a true history (more of a retrospective from a moment in time - that moment being 2008). It would work for the song lyrics in the title prompt (which I've also already filled.)

Up next - I'm determined to finish The War in Nicaragua which I've been reading on and off for a year, I'm close to the end so I think today is the day.

QOTW: When I think of the worst moms, I think first of VC Andrews who wrote more than one terrible mom - starting with Olivia and Corrine in Flowers in the Attic, followed by Jillian in the Heaven series.


message 31: by Anne (new)

Anne (annefullercoxnet) | 203 comments The weather has gotten nice in Omaha and I am thrilled. We actually ate dinner on the deck last night and it was so fun to be outside. I love the summer and am excited to see the signs that summer is on the way.

I had a more normal (for me) reading week, despite getting ready for a huge graduation party for my daughter (the grad parties here are really ridiculous). I read five books for my youth committee- I am hoping to be done with that list by the end of May. I read:
Piecing Me Together- I will only say well done and I think every kid in our middle-upper class Midwest high school should read it.
Samantha Spinner and the Super Secret Plans- most of this book was not important to the plot which was only somewhat interesting. Blah.
The Heart and Mind of Frances Pauley- a quiet (average) read about a girl dealing with a difficult relationship with her sister, finding friends her age, and dealing with the death of a beloved adult in her life. It was Ok.
Batman: Nightwalker- I know a lot of you loved this book, but I wasn't a big fan. I am just the wrong audience. I am kind of bummed I didn't love it (especially since Wonder Woman: Warbringer is also on my youth committee list.) Hopefully I'll like that one better.
I listened to It's All Relative: Adventures Up and Down the World's Family Tree- and enjoyed it. This will be my book tied to my ancestry as I was struggling to fill that prompt.

QOTW: So many horrible moms. I had forgotten all about Flowers in the Attic- but as that book scarred me for life I'm going to have to second (or third?) that vote. I wish I'd never read that one.

Happy Reading!


message 32: by Larissa (new)

Larissa Langsather (langsather) The weather report says it will warm up in time for Mother's Day but right now it is a little on the cool side with rain coming and going.

I finished the first book in the Left Behind Series for book with 2 authors and an attempt to read some of the books of the Great Americans Reads List- is anyone else doing that or is anyone else really interested in that PBS series? I like the books for what they are- speculation of end times but now with outdated technologies. I never really liked how the female characters were portrayed, but I remember it getting a little better as the books progress.

Currently:
Turtles All the Way Down- still haven't gotten past the first disc- I have been way too busy with my church groups and Bible studies.
Shabanu: Daughter of the Wind- for weather element and Newbery challenge, I really like this book.

QotW:
Horrible mothers- where do I begin? Makes me appreciate my own mother so much more. Mrs. Bennett for being whiny and so overbearing, Aunt Petunia for the way she treated Harry and her blind eye toward Dudley's flaws, even though she was nonfiction that mother from The Glass Castle was infuriating and so selfish, Cecile/Inzilla in One Crazy Summer was also so selfish and hard to like (I would think that someone who wasn't loved would try harder to prove she could love her own but people are different and I guess I have to accept it and it makes for eye opening reads and opens up dialogue)- I don't think I have personally read any really abusive mothers and I know they are out there but none come to mind right now. Of course step mothers and fairy tale mothers also come to mind but I would have to spend more time thinking about it.


message 33: by Chinook (last edited May 10, 2018 09:12AM) (new)

Chinook | 731 comments Taylor, I have a Netgalley copy of Not Afraid of the Fall. I’m curious now, plus they would work for local authors for me. My ratings stay the same regardless of free copy - my reviews are for me, not the author.


message 34: by Johanne (last edited May 10, 2018 09:21AM) (new)

Johanne *the biblionaut* | 1301 comments Good afternoon from Copenhagen, where we´ve had summer weather this week (Danish summer standards which means 20C and sunny)

This week went by fast. I´m still feeling the cold/ flu from last week. I had a little nephew on monday evening (my brother´s 3rd son, sooo cute), and speaking of mothers, my mum had a complete emotional meltdown tuesday morning, while I was making breakfast for my sons and my brother´s two older sons who had slept over at my place, because of the birth. This was on the phone thankfully, and I ended up hanging up on her... Somewhere around "I don´t understand why you waste your life with a man who is so down all the time" (my husband has suffered from generalised anxiety disorder for the last 3-4 years) and "you have me so worried about you, that you destroyed my joy of having a new grandchild". Yeah, she said that. Out of the blue, at 7.30 in the morning. And I am NOT a morning person. I really love my mother, and I know she loves me. She is actually also quite fond of my husband, which you wouldn´t think after that outburst. She just has these meltdowns sometimes, and I´m really thankful I have my brother, to have someone who understands without having to explain everything. And I really couldn´t talk to my husband about this particular outburst, he feels inadequate enough as it is.

So enough about that, you have now been used for my personal emotional outlet (sorry, not really sorry).

This week I finished:
The Underground Railroad on audio. I really, really liked that book. For now I´m using it for Goodreads awards winner (historical fiction 2016).

Kick. A children´s book about Budi who lives in Jakarta and whose dream is to become a professional football player and play for Real Madrid. But for now he works in the factory that makes the shoes for the players. The book succeeds in telling a story about a boy living under very different circumstances than the average European child and at the same time making us see how we are all alike as humans. Using it for "sports" I think, but it also works for "problem facing society" (exploitation of cheap child labour).

I read a couple of picture books, one was Archie and the Bear and I must say there is an abundance of picture books with animals in the title, if anyone wants a quick read for this prompt.

Currently reading Den tatoverede mand (The Warded Man).

and listening to The Handmaid's Tale


QOTW
The mother to one of the charcters in the Warded Man is absolutely awful. The Other Mother in Coraline takes the prize of most scary mum.

Other than that I think the mums that are awful are so, because they are flawed in some way. Most mothers try, but are not always successful. In life and in books.


message 35: by SarahKat (new)

SarahKat | 163 comments Hello everyone,

I finished 3 books this week:

The Grim Grotto by Lemony Snicket not for the challenge
Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides for a country that fascinates me (Greece, at the beginning at least)
The Miserable Mill by Lemony Snicket not for the challenge

Working On:
Voyager by Diana Gabaldon won't fit in challenge (Might exchange for Middlesex)
Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things by Jenny Lawson for a book about mental health
Empire of Storms by Sarah J. Maas - not for challenge
The Austere Academy by Lemony Snicket not for challenge

QOTW:
Definitely Adora from Sharp Objects


message 36: by Chinook (new)

Chinook | 731 comments Nadine wrote: "Unauthorized Cinnamon wrote: "... These are very strange, yet completely appropriate to read back-to-back. If I were still in college, I would have a term paper all set up for me! Helen is terribly..."

Duuuuuude. Love this comparison.


message 37: by Johanne (new)

Johanne *the biblionaut* | 1301 comments Cendaquenta wrote: "Johanne wrote: "Cendaquenta wrote: ... I don't think any of them fit into Popsugar, although I'd be grateful for suggestions of prompts to slot them into. (Or Read Harder tasks, as I'm doing that c..."

Alright then, they were also obvious, so I thought you might have :)


message 38: by Dani (new)

Dani Weyand | 303 comments Raquel wrote: "The Dead in Their Vaulted Arches I didn't realize when I started this for my second vacation read that it was a much heavier book than the rest of the series so far. Very good, but wouldn't have been my first pick for relaxing on the beach. Would easily work for the death and grief prompt if I hadn't already filled it...."

I’ve been loving this series! I think this is the last book I read too, and it was probably my favorite. I can’t wait to get back into some Flavia shenanigans but I want to clear my checkout pile before I add anymore to it lol


message 39: by Sheri (new)

Sheri | 793 comments Hi everyone!

Weather continues to be summery, if a little rainy, here in Michigan.

Had a bit of a slow reading week. I was angry at a lot of media last week so I read some comic books, including

The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl, Vol. 1: Squirrel Power - I'd accidentally bought and read vol 2 first, so i went back and read vol 1, still loved it. It's such a light hearted and silly comic, good for a break.

Sex Criminals, Vol. 4: Fourgy! - love the series. There's a lot of sex and innuendo and dumb puns and such, but under all of that it digs down into relationships and mental illness and how they affect each other.

I drug my feet a lot but finally got through Song of Solomon, which is my read harder pick for Oprah book club. It was just ok for me, I had a hard time really relating to anyone or really caring where the plot was going. I really liked Beloved so I'd hoped I'd enjoy this too, was a bit disappointed.

Currently reading: Purple Hibiscus which will be my book with my favorite color in the title.

QOTW:

Offhand the mother from Sharp Objects comes to mind. There's a lot of reasons, some I can't go into, but every interaction with her daughters is unpleasant.

I'd agree with Petunia from Harry Potter. She spoiled Dudley into rottenness, and did not even TRY to treat Harry like anything other than an unwanted burden.

Also Mrs Trunchbull from Matilda. She might not have been Miss Honey's mother, but she was the female guardian for her and used that position to make Miss Honey's life miserable.


message 40: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 7066 comments Mod
Heather wrote: "... QOTW: The mother in The English Wife was pretty horrible (just going back through what I've read this year..."

How did you like that book? I've got it checked out from the library right now. But I keep reading other library books first! It's been "on the top of the pile" for two weeks now ...


message 41: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 7066 comments Mod
Johanne wrote: "Good afternoon from Copenhagen, where we´ve had summer weather this week (Danish summer standards which means 20C and sunny)

This week went by fast. I´m still feeling the cold/ flu from last week...."


I am so sorry to hear about your conversation with your mother. That's a real burden to deal with in your life.


message 42: by Tara (new)

Tara Nichols (tarajoy90) | 167 comments Summer has arrived in Phoenix, which means I'll either be inside or on vacation for the next 5 months.

Finished
Big Little Lies I read this for my IRL book club and also for the Celebrity Book Club prompt. I honestly had pretty low expectations because I didn't think it would be my kind of book, so I was really pleased with how much I enjoyed it. I am a mom of young elementary aged kids, so I related to and loved the humorous parts about being in that world (I about died with the mention of the "support group for parents of gifted children"). And I just HAD to know how it ended so I read the last 250 pages in essentially one sitting.

The Day the World Came to Town: 9/11 in Gander, Newfoundland I used this for the book that is also a play prompt. This book was so touching and just delightful. I loved it. It is about the small town of Gander, and the small towns surrounding it, who took in almost 7000 airplane passengers who were diverted to and stranded in Newfoundland on 9/11 and the days following. The way these people dropped everything to meet every need was overwhelming. I think I cried during every chapter.

Challenge Progress
32/52 (27/42 regular, 5/10 advanced)

Currently Reading
Dead Man Walking: The Eyewitness Account of the Death Penalty That Sparked a National Debate Using this for the true crime prompt. It's a tough subject to read about, but Sister Helen Prejean is a hero of mine and I'm glad I finally picked up this excellent book.

The Thirteenth Tale (book about twins) This is pretty dark so far, but the story is intriguing so I'm going to carry on.

Tell Me More: Stories about the 12 Hardest Things I'm Learning to Say I'm usually really not into self-help type books, but this book is very story driven and I'm loving it so far.

QOTW
I feel like this should be a pretty easy question, but for whatever reason I can only think of bad moms in nonfiction right now. The ones I'm thinking of are the mom from Educated: A Memoir and the stepmom from The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics. They're both dreadful.


message 43: by Chinook (new)

Chinook | 731 comments Larissa wrote: "The weather report says it will warm up in time for Mother's Day but right now it is a little on the cool side with rain coming and going.

I finished the first book in the Left Behind..."


I’m curious about the PBS list - I may try and read the ones I haven’t before. I downloaded Atlas Shrugged since it was on the list as an audiobook, since I’m not sure I’m going to like it. It’s 60 hours long! So I don’t know that I’ll actually get to/through it before the due date because I have a lot of audiobooks taken out right now.


message 44: by Johanne (new)

Johanne *the biblionaut* | 1301 comments Nadine wrote: "Johanne wrote: "Good afternoon from Copenhagen, where we´ve had summer weather this week (Danish summer standards which means 20C and sunny)

I am so sorry to hear about your conversation with your mother. That's a real burden to deal with in your life. ."


Thanks. It is. I genuinely think she wants to easen my burdens, but half the time adds on instead. It makes me sad. And angry.


message 45: by Taylor (new)

Taylor | 178 comments Chinook wrote: "Taylor, I have a Netgalley copy of Not Afraid of the Fall. I’m curious now, plus they would work for local authors for me. My ratings stay the same regardless of free copy - my reviews are for me, ..."

That's good to know! And maybe everyone else really is enjoying it more than I am but I just found it very suspect that everyone who mentioned they had gotten an advanced copy also gave it 5 stars and glowing review. I'm interested to hear what your thoughts are once you get around to reading it!


message 46: by Chinook (new)

Chinook | 731 comments Sheri wrote: "Hi everyone!

Weather continues to be summery, if a little rainy, here in Michigan.

Had a bit of a slow reading week. I was angry at a lot of media last week so I read some comic books, includin..."


I love Unbeatable Squirrel Girl - need to reread. We got a poster for the living room of her on Free Comic Book Day.


message 47: by Christy (new)

Christy | 351 comments Hello everyone! I did not finish any books this week, but that is okay.
I'm currently reading:
Baby, I'm Howling for You for author with the same first name as me. It's fascinating to me because it's written for someone with very different fantasies than I have--the whole mate/pair bonding things sounds suffocating to me! I'm enjoying the peek into a very different way of thinking about relationships.
I'm listening to The Woman in White, and very much enjoying it. Mister Fairlie is hilarious to me!
I've also started Lonesome Dove, which I expect to be reading for quite a while. I'm only 50 pages in, but I'm loving the language.
QOTW: I do enjoy a terrible literary mother. Medea is one of my faves--baking your children into a pie and serving them to your philandering husband is some next-level bad parenting. She does it with flair though, you gotta hand it to her.


message 48: by Johanne (new)

Johanne *the biblionaut* | 1301 comments Oh yes, Medea!


message 49: by Lauren (last edited May 10, 2018 10:28AM) (new)

Lauren Oertel | 764 comments This week I finished 168 Hours: You Have More Time Than You Think, which was decent, but about half of it was about kids, which doesn't apply to me.

I also listened to The Chalk Man. I don't do mysteries too often, and this one was pretty interesting, but the ending wasn't as surprising as I hoped (not that I correctly guessed who the killer was, but some of the other parts).

I finally finished Witnessing Whiteness: First Steps Toward an Antiracist Practice and Culture, and it was worth the read, but quite an effort to get through it. I recommend it to all white people interested in antiracism work.

I also listened to Song of Solomon, but it probably would have been more enjoyable if I read the print/kindle version. The audio quality wasn't good and the extra narrator was awkward. But I could tell how great the writing was and there were very powerful moments.

I just started Children of Blood and Bone which starts off strong, even though I don't normally read much fantasy. I'm looking forward to the rest of this one!

I'm still working on The Courage to Hope: How I Stood Up to the Politics of Fear, which gets into some interesting civil rights history. This woman is brave, brave, brave... (for those of you who know Bryan Stevenson/Rosa Parks's quote).

QOTW: I also thought of the mothers in The Glass Castle and Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine for this one. Probably the mother in Educated: A Memoir too. Oh and good catch on that Gone Girl suggestion! ;)


message 50: by Carmen (new)

Carmen (TheReadingTrashQueen) (thereadingtrashqueen) | 908 comments Cendaquenta wrote: "Next few days are going to be more interesting though - I'm planning to see Infinity War at the weekend and Monday is the She Reads Comics night at Glasgow Forbidden Planet. Perhaps this time I will talk!"

Oohhh have 'fun' at Infinity War (let me know what you think!) and at Forbidden Planet! I've heard about these nights, but don't really know what happens at them. I am majorly intrigued by them though, even if I live in the wrong country haha!


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