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Favorite Presses > Dorothy

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message 1: by Marc (new)

Marc (monkeelino) | 351 comments Dorothy seems like a pretty fascinating small press project. They publish fiction (and "near fiction"), by women, and usually only two books per year. I can't personally vouch for any of their titles yet, but they've gotten some good press.


message 2: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 10587 comments I love the Atlantic take on them "Dorothy books emerge each October like ringing endorsements of writers you’ve never heard of by a friend whose taste you can absolutely trust.”


message 3: by WndyJW (new)

WndyJW | 6613 comments this sounds very interesting! thank you, Marc!


message 4: by WndyJW (new)

WndyJW | 6613 comments I like their website. I realized that I am a sucker for a book cover featuring a desolate landscape and the book title placed low, just above the horizon of the desolate landscape.


message 5: by Marc (new)

Marc (monkeelino) | 351 comments The write-ups are, indeed, pretty enticing, Paul.
And I'm also a sucker for their aesthetic/design, WindyJW (desolate landscapes kind of call to a person, no?).


message 6: by Sara G (new)

Sara G | 166 comments I've read almost half of their works (I'm a sucker for collecting matching sets of books) and I've enjoyed them all. My favorites have been the Gladman that I read (they've published a few), the Fritz, and the Walsh. My local bookseller highly recommended Dan, but I haven't read that one yet.


message 7: by Marc (new)

Marc (monkeelino) | 351 comments Sounds like the hype is deserved--thanks for lending the perspective of someone who has read some of their titles.


message 8: by WndyJW (new)

WndyJW | 6613 comments I have to say that the last thing I need is her another treasure trove of books! Of course I’m intrigued, but my TBR and Wish List as they stand now can keep me busy for the rest of the year.

This is an exciting press, Marc.


message 9: by H Anthony (new)

H Anthony | 22 comments I've read The Babysitter at Rest by Jen George, which was pretty remarkable.


message 10: by Sara G (new)

Sara G | 166 comments If it makes you feel better, WndyJW, they are all short so you can burn through your TBR pile faster. ;)

Another reason I have so many Dorothy works is that when you buy one from their website, they give you a deal on a second book they recommend reading with it, so I always get a minimum of two.


message 11: by Marc (new)

Marc (monkeelino) | 351 comments WndyJW wrote: "Of course I’m intrigued, but my TBR and Wish List as they stand now can keep me busy for the rest of the year."

Or, the rest of one's life... :D

Great to know they're not too long (I am more likely to squeeze in unplanned shorter reads), Sara.

I didn't realize that George book was short stories--glad to hear it was so good, H Anthony.


message 12: by Brooks (new)

Brooks | 4 comments Ah! I've been reading Dorothy books for a while now (I've read about 75% of their current output, and have a couple of their books sitting on my shelves waiting for me)

I'll second the recommendations for Jen George (The Babysitter at Rest) and Joanna Ruocco (Dan), and add in Fra Keeler by Azareen van der Vliet Oloomi and Suite for Barbara Loden by Nathalie Leger.

But then there's also the Ravickian books by Gladman (last year brought out the fourth book) and the quiet, effective short story collections (Amina Cain's Creature and Joanna Walsh's Vertigo) that I also really liked.

Basically, I just preorder whatever comes out each October and trust that it will be good.


message 13: by WndyJW (new)

WndyJW | 6613 comments I wonder if they offer a subscription like some indie presses? Now I’m even more tempted!


message 14: by Jen (new)

Jen | 134 comments I also really enjoyed Joanna Walsh's Vertigo - I'd like to read more Dorothy titles.


message 15: by Marc (new)

Marc (monkeelino) | 351 comments Just stumbled across the news that Dorothy will be entering into a "sales and distribution partnership" with New York Review Books (which, I believe, means they'll be listed in the NY Review Books catalog and their 2021 books will come out in April 2022 instead of October of this year, with their two-books-per-year releases back on schedule October 2022).
https://www.bookforum.com/papertrail/michael-robbins-on-nature-and-poetry-jewish-currents-launches-a-podcast-24544


message 16: by Tracy (new)

Tracy (tstan) | 424 comments Marc wrote: "Just stumbled across the news that Dorothy will be entering into a "sales and distribution partnership" with New York Review Books (which, I believe, means they'll be listed in the NY Review Books ..."

I had heard Dorothy was in financial trouble. I’m glad they will still be able to provide excellent books, but it’s too bad they’re having to go with a bigger fish.


message 17: by WndyJW (new)

WndyJW | 6613 comments Agreed, Tracy.


message 18: by David (last edited Sep 11, 2022 07:57AM) (new)

David | 2194 comments Paul wrote: "I love the Atlantic take on them "Dorothy books emerge each October like ringing endorsements of writers you’ve never heard of by a friend whose taste you can absolutely trust.”"

This year's books will emerge on October 4th. The two books will be:
Some of Them Will Carry Me by debut author Giada Scodellaro; and
A Horse at Night: On Writing by Amina Cain

Both look intriguing as always.


message 19: by Alwynne (new)

Alwynne | 845 comments David wrote: "Paul wrote: "I love the Atlantic take on them "Dorothy books emerge each October like ringing endorsements of writers you’ve never heard of by a friend whose taste you can absolutely trust.”"

This..."


Thanks David, I'm particularly looking forward to the short stories.


message 20: by David (new)

David | 2194 comments Alwynne wrote: "Thanks David, I'm particularly looking forward to the short stories."

I am too. Everything they publish is excellent so it's interesting to see them put forward a debut.


message 21: by WndyJW (new)

WndyJW | 6613 comments Another US press I need to pay more attention to.


message 22: by WndyJW (new)

WndyJW | 6613 comments How do we choose the 6 we want for $60? I love the options, but the website is not intuitive.


message 23: by Alwynne (new)

Alwynne | 845 comments WndyJW wrote: "How do we choose the 6 we want for $60? I love the options, but the website is not intuitive."

It's one of the few presses that I pretty much faithfully follow and just buy their books regardless. Have a couple still to read that I bought ages ago.


message 24: by WndyJW (new)

WndyJW | 6613 comments I need to get some of these titles and start paying attention to their new releases.


message 25: by David (new)

David | 2194 comments There are only 26 titles (2 a year, released in October) so it's not too hard to navigate the site: https://dorothyproject.com/books-gall...


message 26: by David (new)

David | 2194 comments The ongoing special sale of 6 for $60 (including shipping in the US) is enticing. Any recommendations, Alwynne? I know others here follow this press as well.


message 27: by Tracy (new)

Tracy (tstan) | 424 comments I haven’t read them yet, but the Nathalie Leger books are up soon- I’ve heard so much about them.
Leona Carrington is good, Christina Rivera Garza is wonderful, and I adore Duras- though she’s not for everyone.
The first book I got from them was Wild Milk, and I liked some of the stories, others not as much.

These books are not only quirky, with a variety of styles. The books themselves are high quality, with thick paper and beautiful covers.


message 28: by WndyJW (new)

WndyJW | 6613 comments When I selected A Horse At Night it gave me the option of that or that title and Some of Them Will Carry Me or Six for Sixty, when I selected Six for Sixty it went bright to PayPal before I designated my 6 titles. I don’t plan on buying 6 books right now, I was just curious.


message 29: by David (new)

David | 2194 comments I'm tempted by the 6 for $60. Four of those may be the Ravicka novels.


message 30: by Alwynne (new)

Alwynne | 845 comments David wrote: "The ongoing special sale of 6 for $60 (including shipping in the US) is enticing. Any recommendations, Alwynne? I know others here follow this press as well."

If I had to choose, I'd probably go for Who Was Changed and Who Was Dead; The Weight of Things; the Leger's; and the Cristina Rivera Garza collection. But I also like Joanna Walsh, the Leonora Carrington but there are other editions of her work. I wasn't blown away by the Beilin, and have the Scanlon and the Waldrop still to read. I'm fascinated by Duras so worth it for others who are too? I'm less sure about Gladman.


message 31: by David (new)

David | 2194 comments These all look good. I have the Rivera Garza already, which I've been meaning to get to. I agree the Beilin might be one to pass on.


message 32: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 10587 comments The Leger trilogy is magnificent (also available from Les Fugitives in the UK). Generally they do seem to partner with UK presses (And Other Stories for Garza and Walsh as well) which I do like to see


message 33: by David (new)

David | 2194 comments Alwynne wrote: "I'm less sure about Gladman."

Are you not a fan of the Ravicka series or just wary?


message 34: by Marc (new)

Marc (monkeelino) | 351 comments The Duras collection was great--fascinating range and depth!


message 35: by David (new)

David | 2194 comments Marc wrote: "The Duras collection was great--fascinating range and depth!"

Me & Other Writing looks outstanding. Are these essays, Marc, or fiction?


message 36: by Alwynne (new)

Alwynne | 845 comments David wrote: "Alwynne wrote: "I'm less sure about Gladman."

Are you not a fan of the Ravicka series or just wary?"


I think she writes really well and I like the concept. They're strange and inventive but I'm not that keen on the fantasy aspect, and they're quite dense. I should probably try them again at some point. A friend on Goodreads compared her to Samuel R. Delany, who is another writer I admire but don't actually enjoy reading, at least so far - except for his memoir The Motion of Light in Water: Sex and Science Fiction Writing in the East Village


message 37: by David (new)

David | 2194 comments That makes sense. I’ve read some of her other work and can see that being true for the Revicka novels.


message 38: by Marc (new)

Marc (monkeelino) | 351 comments The Duras is all nonfiction essays. I don't think I realized that when I ordered it but I plan on reading their entire catalog eventually so it didn't really matter.


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