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David Peace
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message 1: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10401 comments Mod
Inspired by....


Roman Clodia wrote: "I've just finishedNineteen Seventy Seven and am just blown away by this and the previous 1973: starting Nineteen Eighty next - definitely not bedtime reading, but wow, David Peace can write"


message 2: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10401 comments Mod
Nigeyb wrote: "So pleased to discover you are immersed in The Red Riding Trilogy RC. That's exactly what happened to me. Just read them all, one after the other.

Shades of James Ellroy dontcha think?"





message 3: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10401 comments Mod
Nigeyb wrote: "So please to discover you are immersed in The Red Riding Trilogy RC. That's exactly what happened to me. Just read them all, one after the other.

Shades of James Ellroy dontcha think?"


Roman Clodia wrote: "Better than Ellroy - there, I've said it!"

Steady on RC

:-)


message 4: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10401 comments Mod
Susan wrote: "I am with RC!"


I couldn't possibly choose - I love them both too much :-)

Ellroy's influence on David Peace is undeniable though, and it's hard to imagine his early work would have been the same without him first having read and absorbed Ellroy's style


message 5: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10401 comments Mod
I've not read any David Peace books since The Damned Utd, which is probably a bit of an oversight.


Anyone read Red or Dead?

Or the first two of the Tokyo Trilogy....

2007 Tokyo Year Zero
2009 Occupied City
2019 Patient X: The Case-Book of Ryunosuke Akutagawa


message 6: by Roman Clodia (new)

Roman Clodia | 5698 comments Mod
To be fair to Ellroy, I probably made a mistake by plunging into LA Confidential and probably should have started with The Black Dahlia... all the same, LA and the later Perfidia didn't affect me emotionally in the same way that Peace's books do.

Has anyone read his GB84 about the miners'strike?


message 7: by Nigeyb (last edited May 03, 2018 12:47PM) (new)

Nigeyb | 10401 comments Mod
Roman Clodia wrote: "Has anyone read his GB84 about the miners'strike? "


Hellz yeah. GB84 is a dramatisation of the miners' strike in which real events (Orgreave, the Brighton bomb) and real people (Arthur Scargill, Margaret Thatcher, Ian MacGregor) mingle imperceptibly with Dave's creations.

"This novel", he notes in the acknowledgements, "is a fiction, based on fact" and Dave does not take liberties with the strike's trajectory.

A gripping read and, as with all his books, it brilliantly evokes the era.


message 8: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10401 comments Mod
This is a good review of GB84....


Haunting, seminal, bleak, iconic, furied. So many of the words used about the miners' strike of 1984, a time which history books may come to refer to as the last English civil war, can be applied with equal validity to this attempt to bring the era to life in novel form. Sadly, readers new to Peace, or less than forgiving of his staccato style and unyielding refusal to extend even a finger of friendship to the concept of plot simplicity, may be left thinking of other phrases from the year. Madly ambitious. Confused. Flawed from conception. A struggle.

Peace, a tremendously amiable Yorkshireman named last year as one of Granta's 30 Best of Young British writers, has a style instantly recognisable to fans of James Ellroy and John Dos Passos. He builds a perfect sense of time and place by interspersing his narrative with diaries, newspaper reports, dreams, grocery lists. He honed the style in four acclaimed novels covering the way in which Yorkshire was traumatised by the Peter Sutcliffe years, building what has been called an 'occult history' of the underbelly of those times. The other great defining story from then, for him, for Yorkshire, for Britain, was the strike.

Rest here...

https://www.theguardian.com/books/200...




message 9: by Roman Clodia (new)

Roman Clodia | 5698 comments Mod
Looks excellent, thanks Nigeyb.

I'm currently 40% into 1980 and am creeped out by Jack Whitehead...


message 10: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10401 comments Mod
You're racing through them Roman Clodia


message 11: by Susan (new)

Susan | 10654 comments Mod
I haven't read, GB84 GB84 by David Peace but I obviously need to. Shame I didn't think of David Peace for the 1980's nomination, but titles always come to you afterwards... To be fair, though, "High Dive," is a good book. Perhaps after re-reading it, I will try GB84.


message 12: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10401 comments Mod
Susan wrote: ""High Dive," is a good book. Perhaps after re-reading it, I will try GB84 "


High Dive is fab. A lot more linear than GB84"

Susan wrote: "Shame I didn't think of David Peace for the 1980's nomination, but titles always come to you afterwards"

Absolutely - happens to me all the time too


message 13: by Roman Clodia (new)

Roman Clodia | 5698 comments Mod
Nigeyb wrote: "You're racing through them Roman Clodia"

I know - they're utterly unputdownable! I finished 1980 in the small hours of the morning... hurrah for a Bank Holiday weekend. I definitely think a dose of genteel Jane Austen or similar will be required after 1983 ;))


message 14: by Susan (new)

Susan | 10654 comments Mod
Yes, recovery novels, RC :)


message 15: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10401 comments Mod
Indeed so, you'll need a palate cleanser or two.


message 16: by Susan (new)

Susan | 10654 comments Mod
David Peace has a new book out, September 4th:

Patient X: The Case-Book of Ryunosuke Akutagawa Patient X The Case-Book of Ryunosuke Akutagawa by David Peace

Ryunosuke Akutagawa was one of Japan's great writers - author of the stories 'Rashomon' and 'In a Bamboo Grove', most famously - who lived through Japan's turbulent Taisho period of 1912 to 1926, including the devastating 1923 Earthquake, only to take his own life at the age of just thirty-five in 1927.

These are the stories of Patient X in one of our iron castles. He will tell his tales to anyone with the ears and the time to listen -

Inspired and informed by Akutagawa's stories, essays and letters, David Peace has fashioned a most extraordinary novel of tales. An intense, passionate, haunting paean to one writer, it also thrillingly explores the act and obsession of writing itself, and the role of the artist, both in public and private life, in times which darkly mirror our own.


message 17: by Nigeyb (last edited May 22, 2018 01:46AM) (new)

Nigeyb | 10401 comments Mod
Thanks Susan.


I believe Patient X: The Case-Book of Ryunosuke Akutagawa is the third and final part of the Tokyo Trilogy. I've not read either of the other books yet, Tokyo Year Zero and Occupied City.

Does anyone know the extent to which these books are interlinked? And whether they need to read in order?

This is what Wikipedia has to say....

Tokyo Year Zero (2007) follows the investigations of a Tokyo detective in the aftermath of Japan's defeat in World War II. It is based on the true story of serial killer Yoshio Kodaira. It is the first of Peace's novels to be set outside of Yorkshire and forms the first part of a trio of books on the U.S. military occupation of Japan.

The second book, published in August 2009, is called Occupied City, a Rashomon-like telling of the Hirasawa Sadamichi case in Tokyo in 1948.

The final volume of the Tokyo trilogy, Patient X, was published in 2018. Subtitled The case-book of Ryūnosuke Akutagawa, it follows the life of author Akutagawa from his childhood to his suicide in 1927, including his witnessing of the Great Kantō earthquake that devastated most of Tokyo and much of the surrounding region in 1923


Weirdly, this article from April 2018 suggests to me that Patient X might not be the third in the trilogy. It discusses Patient X and then concludes with....

At present, Peace is trying to complete the final novel in his Japanese crime trilogy, which began with Tokyo Year Zero (2007), for publication next year.

https://inews.co.uk/culture/books/dav...


message 18: by Susan (new)

Susan | 10654 comments Mod
Thanks, Nigeyb. I had no idea - so probably need to start the trilogy from the beginning.


message 19: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10401 comments Mod
Yes indeed, although as I say I am not certain if Patient X is the final part of the trilogy or not. On balance, I suspect not.


message 20: by Susan (new)

Susan | 10654 comments Mod
I have been home today and came across the Red Riding boxset on TV. Has anyone watched it? I have downloaded the first one - I seem to be watching more TV than usual these days.


message 21: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10401 comments Mod
I thought it was a very powerful adaptation. I'll be interested in what you make of it Susan


message 22: by Susan (new)

Susan | 10654 comments Mod
Yes, I will try to get to it at the weekend, along with the Jeremy Thorpe programme.


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