Ultimate Popsugar Reading Challenge discussion

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2018 Weekly Checkins > Week 18: 4/27 - 5/3

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message 1: by Sara (new)

Sara | 1508 comments Hello and happy check-in Thursday! The weather has finally turned here, and it’s hot, hot, hot! I wish spring and fall seasons were longer. I’d like to be able to sit outside on my deck and read, but it’s always either too hot or too cold. Sigh...

**Admin stuff - Discussion is open for May’s group read if you are interested in reading along for Turtles All the Way Down.

We are still looking for discussion leaders for July (The Woman in Cabin 10) and August (The Night Circus). If you are interested please contact me or Nadine!


Sadly I have no reading updates this week. I’m struggling to find a book that hooks my interest.

Question of the week:

Mother’s Day is approaching here in the US (May 13th for those of you who need the heads up!). In honor of mothers everywhere, who is your favorite literary mom?


There are so many amazing mothers represented in literature, but my mind immediately goes to Molly Weasley from the Harry Potter series. She is soft, loving and tender with her children, but she will not hesitate to call them out if they step out of line. And she will (and does) defend them with everything she has if she feels they are threatened. She is the glue that holds the Weasley family together.

I would give an honorable mention to Marmee from Little Women :)


message 2: by Megan (new)

Megan (mghrt06) | 540 comments I finished two this week.

Finished Into the Water for my ugly cover. It was ok. All the different perspectives were confusing at times. But the audio production was pretty good.

Finished Emmy & Oliver for favorite prompt of 2015. I really enjoyed this contemporary!

Now I'm going to start author with same name as me. Going with The End of Everything.

14 Regular, 1 Advanced, 4 non Challenge. Still behind but I've got a lot requested from the library.

QOTW Mrs. Weasley


message 3: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1254 comments It's been a good reading week thanks to readathon, though I've ended up with three different books on the go. It's another bank holiday weekend here in the UK (why are they all so bunched up in spring?) so I have a spare day of reading ahead.

Finished:
I picked up Binti for a quick read before readathon and I enjoyed it but would have probably have liked to read the trilogy in one go as it is a little short by itself, considering the breadth of it. Will definitely be reading the rest though. I'm using this for Read Harder's science fiction with a female characetr written by a woman.

Ahhh Dread Nation was so good, I don't know why it's not out in the UK. When Gettysburg's dead rise again, the US government hatch up a plan to send black kids to schools to fight the undead. It looks at slavery, white supremacy and corrupt governments from a different angle.

The Best We Could Do is a graphic memoir that I'm using for Read Harder's comic written and illustrated by the same person. When Thi has her first child, she starts thinking of her relationship with her parents and she recounts their life in Vietnam and the path that brought them to America. I learned a little bit about Vietnam's history too.

Out of the Blue could work for so many prompts although nothing that works for me (LGBT+ character, if your favourite colour is blue, it's set in Scotland (country that fascinates you or ancestry), about grief, lyrics). I thought it'd just be a fun book about angels falling from the sky but it's also about death, grief and searching for answers.

In Real Life was a bit too simplistic in its messaging but credit to Cory Doctorow for trying to teach a bit of economics through story form. A gamer is hired to remove gold farmers from a game but ends up befriending one, a boy in China who explains his situation to her.

Currently reading:
I started Into the Into the Drowning Deep during readathon but didn't get far into it. I am loving it so far and just need to find time to sit down with it again. I'm using it for a book set at sea.

Still reading Other Minds: The Octopus, the Sea, and the Deep Origins of Consciousness (and I think it goes hand in hand with the killer mermaids).

I had been looking for a mild true crime book for both Popsugar and Read Harder but because it's topical I picked up I'll Be Gone in the Dark (and avoided the news about it). Honestly, I'm reminded why I don't usually read this sort of thing, it's so upsetting. And why were everyone's houses so easy to break into?

QOTW:
I don't really have favourites but I loved expectant mum Harper in The Fireman.


message 4: by Anne (new)

Anne Happy Thursday! 30 of 50 down. Great reading week for me!

Completed:

For fun – Her Last Breath by Linda Castillo. If you like psychological thrillers, Linda Castillo is great – gritty and with rough language, but great. You will never look at the Amish the same way! This involves a fatal hit and run in which a pickup t-bones an Amish buggy, killing three of the four occupants.

The Good Girl by Mary Kubica. I’m reading it for my 50 states Minnesota. Without ruining the plot, I spent the first two thirds (which drag at times and jump through four different voices) muttering that it was a poor man’s Still Missing by Chevy Stevens. The end though- Wowsers. Three stars over all, but the end is awesome.

Cure for the Common Breakup by Beth Kendrick for my Delaware in a 50 states challenge. Chick Lit is not my cup of tea, generally, but this one with fun. The cocktail for which the book is named (1/2 sweet vermouth, splash of orange juice and ½ sparkling white wine) had me concerned that the book would be that sweetsy too. After the above two murders and the drivel I read last week for #32, the celebrity read, this was a welcome reprieve.

Death of a Pinehurst Princess: The 1935 Elva Statler Davidson Mystery by Steve Bouser as a quick Overdrive true crime read. Elva was one of four adopted children of the Statler Hotel founder and his wife. Upon orphanhood, she and her surviving siblings were millionaires (during the Great Depression). This avid North Carolina sportswoman/ lady of leisure died under mysterious circumstances 14 days after her wedding to a man one could classify as a gold digger. Suicide, accident, or murder? I wish Dominick Dunne (Power, Privilege, and Justice) had written this – it would have been more scintillating (although we do know that Elva opted for peach underwear under her wedding gown.)

Everywhere That Mary Went by Lisa Scottoline for a Penn state read – it’s far more psychological thriller than legal drama as Mary DiNunzio is being stalked and her secretary is murdered in a hit and run.

My pick for #1 -- movie I've seen: The Mistletoe Inn by Richard Paul Evans– A movie I’ve already seen. The movie was a Hallmark channel Christmas film and the book is surprisingly a bit grittier with regards to depression, but still wraps it all up with a big bow. I don't generally watch movies in the theater and I always read the book first. If someone still needs one, go see Chappaquiddick and read Death at Chappaquiddick -- AMAZING!

Currently reading:

The Man Who Loved Books Too Much: The True Story of a Thief, a Detective, and a World of Literary Obsession, my #39 Bookstore/ Library, by Allison Hoover Bartlett could also be a True Crime for those that don’t like blood. Fascinating read into the world a literary forgeries and a bit of a psychological textbook.

Through Waters Deep by Sarah Sundin. I’m playing around with Overdrive and don’t have a lot of options. It’s a Christian romance, not my normal true crime or psychological thriller, but so charming, I don’t care. Look – unabashed references to going to church and the Bible!

QOTW - fave literary Mom
This is a great question! We have so many orphaned or motherless daughters that are in the romance world. The Jane Austen books have Mrs. Darcy (every man wants a wife!) who sends her daughter out in a storm and Mrs. Dashwood, an emotional decision maker. Honestly, there is a single literary mom for whom I would give up my own mothers!


message 5: by Karen (new)

Karen | 127 comments I finished two this week:

Daring to Drive, for a book about a country that fascinates me, Saudi Arabia. this was a great book and could work for a book about feminism is anyone is still looking to fill that prompt. I really recommend this one.

The Bear and the Nightingale for book with animal in the title. I listened to this on audio, and the narrator did a great job. I'm looking forward to the next two in this trilogy!

I'm currently reading Howl's Moving Castle for recommended by another taking the popsugar challenge, although I'm wondering if it might count as a childhood classic? I've read about a lot of childhood classics, so having a tough time filling that category.

Cutting for Stone. this is taking my husband and I far too long to finish. We're 80% through and had to return audio to library, so now are working through an ebook. We've enjoyed the description of medicine in a mission hospital, and elsewhere, but are really struggling to connect to the character and finish. We've come to far to dnf now.

QOTW: I like Anne (of Anne of Green Gables). I love that she takes her children seriously, testing them like adults by discussing their concerns with them instead of being dismissive. she encourages their imagination and their personhood.


message 6: by Dani (new)

Dani Weyand | 299 comments I’m glad I’m finding time now to update because today is busy busy busy. Nail appointment, doctor appointment, OT appointment for my son, then my daughter’s orchestra concert plus all the picking up and dropping off between school and both grandmas for babysitting. Why do I always overbook myself like this lol

But hey, this weather is so lovely and so I’m happy.

American Gods this is the year of me revisiting old favorites. I put this on hold on whim, I love the full cast audio version and thought it’d be nice to revisit before the second season comes out. I still love this book!

A Man Called Ove I don’t think this is for a prompt but I haven’t really tried to see if it fits in a space I haven’t filled yet. Everyone just constantly mentions this author and this has been on my TBR for a while. I most definitely cried, a lot. Ove reminded me a lot of my dad so it was just that much more emotional of a read for me.

The Patron Saint of Liars also probably not for the challenge haha. I really loved Commonwealth and wanted to read some of her other books. I love her writing style, and over all really enjoyed this book. But the character Rose made me so mad the entire time, I couldn’t deal with her. Like, I’m sure we’re supposed to view her through a sympathetic lens but I just thought she was a terrible person who made genuinely terrible life choices.

Something Wicked This Way Comes for the Halloween prompt. See, sometimes I actually read for the challenge. I didn’t really enjoy this. I liked the writing and felt like there was a lot of potential but I guess I had thought this would be a lot creepier than it was. I was actually kind of bored. I’m going over the sparknotes version now because I feel like I was so bored at some points that it went in one ear and out the other. I’d still like to read more Ray Bradbury though, even though I haven’t really liked any of his work yet lol.

So I’m at 31/40; 0/10 with 73 books read this year.

QOTW: my first thought was instantly Molly Weasley. But thinking about I want to also add Ma/Joy from Room I’m sure there’s more that I’m just not thinking of.


message 7: by El (last edited May 03, 2018 05:42AM) (new)

El | 195 comments 30/50 for the challenge; 50 books total.

Finished:
Me Before You by Jojo Moyes for book made into a movie already seen. Maybe I'm in the minority here, but I loved the movie a lot whereas I only liked the book.

The Help by Kathryn Stockett for book by an author of a different ethnicity. Again loved the movie, but only liked the book.

Black Panther: Soul Of A Machine #1, Black Panther: Soul Of A Machine #2 and Avengers: Heroes Welcome #1. They're not for any prompt. I got them and a few others for free on kindle.

QOTW
The only one who comes to my mind is also Molly Weasley.


message 8: by Dani (new)

Dani Weyand | 299 comments Karen wrote: "I finished two this week:

Daring to Drive, for a book about a country that fascinates me, Saudi Arabia. this was a great book and could work for a book about feminism is anyone is still looking to..."


Howl’s was one of my favorite books! I think it could count as a classic. I guess the author was a very big deal children’s author in the UK.


message 9: by Brittany (last edited May 03, 2018 09:36AM) (new)

Brittany | 183 comments Hi All!

We have had an absolutely stunning week weather-wise here in the Gulf. Unfortunately, I didn't spend much of it reading and only knocked out 1 book this week. This means my total read for the past two weeks is just that one book! I've been averaging 3-5 per week so this is definitely my first lull, but I blame it mainly on being super busy at work and then my parents flew into town for the majority of the past week. I'm at 31/50 prompts completed for the challenge.

The book I finished this week was Career of Evil and I loved it. I'll be using this for the book with song lyrics in the title. This easily was my favorite book of the three in this series so far. I loved the fact that we saw more of Robin and that the mystery was so creepy. I have a weird soft spot for serial killers in fiction. It's been a while since I've really gotten into a series and I'm dying to read Lethal White when it comes out.

So as for what I'm reading currently, I got a little enthusiastic at the library today and grabbed 2 new books which means that I have 7 library books at home with me now.

I'm still working on Since We Fell for my book read by a stranger. Decided to switch to Career of Evil when I wasn't really maintaining an interest in this one. Going to get back into it as I think I honestly have just gotten to the good part but dang did it take some slogging to get there.

For a microhistory I have Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers. I've actually signed paperwork to donate my body to science when I eventually die (knocking on wood that's not for ages) and thought I'd read this one to get a better understanding of the use of cadavers out there.

Heat Wave is my easy reading book which I'll use if any of the books I'm currently reading get too heavy or if I need a break. I saw this one and grabbed it on a whim. It looks like a really quick read.

Turtles All the Way Down is another one I grabbed on a whim. It's been on so many recommended reading lists and I think someone said it could also fulfill the mental health prompt so I grabbed it. Last night, while looking up a different book on the forum I saw that this is the book to read for May so well I guess I'm doing that!

I was listening to 'What Should I Read Next' during work today and the author of The Four Tendencies: The Indispensable Personality Profiles That Reveal How to Make Your Life Better was interviewed and I thought the book sounded interesting enough. I was really surprised that my library had it but I'm not sure why I was quite so surprised as I swear they have had just about every book I wanted to read (except Jurassic Park!).

And lastly, I have First Grave on the Right because it's a chick-lit book about a grim reaper and I have the weirdest fascination with lighthearted stories about reapers. This one looks like an easy, super fun read which I think could possibly work for the book about death or grief, but I'm not sure if I'll consider this one as fulfilling what I think is the true spirit of that prompt so I might not use it.

QOTW

Oh man, I may have to come back to this. I think Sara's original response of Mrs. Weasley would be my go-to choice because of how much I adore the HP books but I'm not sure if she's my favorite of all time. I mean, she is maybe not even my favorite mother in the series if you include the epilogue and Cursed Child. There are other characters I adore that ended up technically as mothers but you don't actually read about them actually mothering (except maybe a bit of Ginny in CC). Personally, I think Luna would be a really intriguing character to read about as a mother. Molly was well-intentioned but smothering. I think I'd actually pick Andromeda as my favorite mother we actually got to read about during the original 7 books.

Edit: I totally forgot about the mother in The Hate U Give until Ali mentioned it below. I just read that the other week and I loved the family dynamic in that story - especially the mother. She seemed like a strong, wonderful, loving mother who wasn't going to take anything from anyone but also wasn't going to go over the top with being too smothering.


message 10: by Tara (new)

Tara Bates | 1008 comments I finished Smoke Gets in Your Eyes and Gone Girl this week which brings me to 19 total. I’m in the middle of 2 others with 2 more to start.

QOTW I want to shout out to the adoptive and foster moms in literature; Marilla Cuthbert (Anne of Green Gables), Miss Honey from Matilda, and of course Molly Weasley as a surrogate parent to every child who needs one ❤️


message 11: by Taylor (last edited May 03, 2018 06:45AM) (new)

Taylor | 178 comments Happy Thursday! It is finally spring here in WI and all of the snow has officially melted from my apartment complex!!

I haven't done a check-in for quite some time! This week I finished:

Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore - read it for the group read but did not care for it. Fulfilled prompt involving a bookstore or a library.

Currently reading:

Turtles All the Way Down
Truly Madly Guilty
The Lady of the Rivers
Not Afraid of the Fall

I've been trying not to pick up/start reading any new books because I start grad school at the end of this month. The first class I'm taking is a YA literature course and I have to read 16 (!!) novels in 6 weeks!! I've been trying to give myself a head-start but don't want to start too soon and forget everything I had already read. Luckily I have read a few of the books before so some will just be skim reads/recaps. Hopefully some can fulfill prompts as well!

QOTW:
I'm going to have to agree with the majority here and say Molly Weasley. I can't even think of many other moms in literature, at least none are jumping out at me.


message 12: by Heather (new)

Heather (heatherbowman) | 722 comments I had quite the reading week thanks to Dewey's read-a-thon last weekend. I finished 4 books on Saturday/Sunday and started 1 more that I finished later in the week.

Finished
All Systems Red (set on another planet) - I thought this would be funnier from the summary. It was a good sci-fi story anyway.

My Lady's Choosing: An Interactive Romance Novel (two authors) - This book is a delight. Does anyone know of other choose-your-own-adventure books for adults?

The Beginning of the World in the Middle of the Night (a book you saw a stranger reading) - I've tried to talk about how amazing these short stories are for a couple days and words fail me every time. It's incredible, inspiring, touching. I'm still breathless just thinking about these stories and everything they mean.

Fahrenheit 451 (mentioned in another book) - I can tell a science fiction author is truly special when I have this thought while reading, "They must have owned a time machine."

Sacrifice Moon (next in a series) - I love Stargate and I'm slowly reading my way through the companion novels. This is one of the first ones written, which means it's one of the best. To get the tie-in novel series started, they asked popular fanfiction authors to write them. There is love in this book, even if it's not polished perfect.

Ella Minnow Pea: A Novel in Letters (fruit or vegetable in the title) - It was okay. It might have been a little too clever for my tastes.

Reading
I haven't picked up either of my current reads in over a week. I think I'll set aside my audiobook of The Shadow Land until my vacation at the end of this month. I'll appreciate it more on the long drive. I'm going to try to get back to The Edge of the World tonight.

QOTW
You know, there aren't a lot of good mothers in the books I read. They usually die, are barely in the story, aren't very memorable if they're good people, or they're their child's antagonist. That's a really depressing realization. JK Rowling deserves credit for including so many great mothers (even if we don't get to know some, like Lily and Alice Longbottom, except through other people's memories). Even a villain is allowed to express love and loyalty for her son. I'll say Molly Weasley is the best too.


message 13: by Chandie (new)

Chandie (chandies) | 280 comments Books that tick off prompts:
None. This is a two week check-in and it's been a slow couple of weeks because work has been super busy and I haven't felt like reading when I get home.

I did read a couple of books on the plane on a quick trip this past weekend.

One’s that don’t tick off prompts
Everything You Want me to Be by Mindy Mejira. Young girl is murdered. Honestly I found it very irritating because (view spoiler).

and

The Dark Lake by Sarah Bailey. Another murder mystery. I enjoyed this one a bit more. It went back and forth from the present to the cop’s past. I did enjoy it more than the other but it was just okay because the main character was just so amazingly unlikeable.

QOTW: I'm going to have to go with most of the rest and say Molly Weasley because she is pretty BA.


message 14: by Kenya (last edited May 03, 2018 06:41AM) (new)

Kenya Starflight | 743 comments Happy Thursday!

I read NO books from the challenge this week... but that didn't stop me from reading a few shorter books that weren't for the challenge. I figure I have until the end of the year to finish and so it's not a problem if I stray outside the challenge every so often...

The Midwife's Apprentice -- I loved the author's book Catherine, Called Birdy, and while this book lacks much of the humor that made "Catherine" so fun, it's still an interesting read. The author really did her research on medieval life and "medicine."

Poison or Protect -- Read this novella mostly because it's part of the "Parasol Protectorate" series and I'm a completionist of sorts. Interesting look at a minor character from the world, but not as good as the rest of the series.

Common Grounds: Contemplations, Confessions, and (Unexpected) Connections from the Coffee Shop -- a collection of essays written in coffee shops. While there's some genuinely funny/thoughtful moments, on the whole it feels pretty pointless in the end.

Fragile Things: Short Fictions and Wonders -- What the heck did I just read... I'd been looking forward to diving into more of Neil Gaiman's work (I previously read and liked The Ocean at the End of the Lane) but now I'm not sure if I want to continue reading his stuff. Some of the short stories in here were good, but others... does he have some bizarre sexual hangups or what?

Currently reading:

Stranger in a Strange Land
H. P. Lovecraft Complete Collection

QOTW: I love Molly Weasley, but I'm also quite fond of the mother from Room and her fierce protectiveness of her son. For non-human mothers, I also have to say Ramoth the queen dragon from "Dragonriders of Pern," who's not only extremely protective of her eggs but continues to come to her hatchlings' defense even after they're grown.


Thegirlintheafternoon Happy Thursday, everyone!

COMPLETED

I finished 3 books this week, all of which counted towards challenges. I'm now at 21/50 for Popsugar and 12/24 for Read Harder.

Long Division - This counted for Popsugar's "a book about time travel." If you like twisty, mind-bending narratives, metafiction, and amazing character voices, this could be a great match for you. I loved it.
We're Going to Need More Wine - I listened to this on audiobook for Read Harder's prompt of "a celebrity memoir." It was great! Wonderful performance with a good mix of serious and light-hearted essay topics. If she writes another book, I'll read it.
The Descendants - I used this for Popsugar's prompt of "a book made into a movie I've already seen." I was pretty meh about that movie, but I loved the book! I'm so glad I read it - thanks to Eujean2 for reminding the group it's Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, which inspired me to pick it up sooner than I'd planned.

IN PROGRESS

I'm currently reading The Princess Trap (super sexy and smart so far) and People of the Whale (so beautifully written).

QOTW

Wow, I can't think of any! That's pretty sad - way too many books remove the mom from the picture.


message 16: by Jen (new)

Jen (jentrewren) | 777 comments Sara wrote: "Hello and happy check-in Thursday! The weather has finally turned here, and it’s hot, hot, hot! I wish spring and fall seasons were longer. I’d like to be able to sit outside on my deck and read, b..."

Have you read Breathing under water by Sophie Hardcastle? If not it is fab and would fit mental health, death or grief or recommendation. One of those which sticks with you well after you have finished. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3...


message 17: by Jen (new)

Jen (jentrewren) | 777 comments Still trying to do the landscaping, unpacking and of course car rego and drivers licence also were due for renewal this week plus the usual working full time and judging the science week grant applications......busy busy.
Did finish one book which was the first I pulled out of a packed box and was a reread from over 20 years ago. Still enjoyable and a great blast from the past and it happened to fit a prompt I hadn't done yet.....
A book set in the decade you were born 1) The Vision by Dean Koontz https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

still have to finish How the brain works which is somewhere in a box and have unearthed Turtles all the way down which is OK so far but not really my thing as it turns out.

QOTW
I can't even think of one. They are not usually very prominent in the books I read other than psych ones where the Moms usually deserve jail not praise.


message 18: by Dani (new)

Dani Weyand | 299 comments Heather wrote: "I had quite the reading week thanks to Dewey's read-a-thon last weekend. I finished 4 books on Saturday/Sunday and started 1 more that I finished later in the week.

Finished
[book:All Systems Red..."



That Narcissa scene made me blubber in both the book and the movie.


message 19: by Ali (new)

Ali (aliciaclare) | 153 comments Hello all!

This week I finished 2 books, one of which was for the challenge, but both books I really enjoyed.

First, I finished I'll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer by Michelle McNamara, which was my true crime book. This book was EXCELLENT. McNamara's an incredible writer, and I highly recommend it. If you haven't heard, the golden state killer was recently arrested on DNA evidence, so it makes some of the passages VERY eerie.

I also finished a reread of Do You Want to Start a Scandal by Tessa Dare, which is one of my favorite historical romance novels.

Currently still working my way through Truly Madly Guilty, Meet Cute: Some People Are Destined to Meet, and Othello, none of which I think actually meet for this challenge.

QOTW: Oh god, I completely blanked on this question! I just started looking through some of my favorites and recently read books, and there wasn't a heavy presence of mothers, which is sad since I read a lot of YA! The mom in The Hate U Give is pretty wonderful. Regina Hall is playing her in the upcoming film, and I'm excited to see her portrayal!


message 20: by Brooke (new)

Brooke | 273 comments Hi everyone! It has been a warm, muggy week and we are supposed to have big storms in a couple of hours here in north Texas. It should be nice this weekend, though, so I'm planning to spend a lot of it outdoors. I have to take advantage of any nice weekends now because it will be summer before I know it.

I read 3 books this week, 2 that count for Popsugar, so I’m at 26/52 for this challenge.

Books I finished:
For Popsugar
You Suck by Christopher Moore for a prompt from 2015 (a book with non-human characters). This is a sequel to Bloodsucking Fiends, #2 in the Love Story series. I enjoyed the addition of Abby Normal, a 16-year-old who acts as minion for the main characters. I often imagine Moore’s books as a Mel Brooks-type movie as I am reading. Pure fun fluff to read in between serious or heavy books.

Swimming Lessons by Claire Fuller for a book that involves a library or bookstore (39). This is told in 2 timelines in alternating chapters, with one in the past as letters written from a woman to her husband, hidden in books around his home library and the other in present day from the POV of the woman’s youngest daughter. I liked the writing style, but the more I read the angrier I got. I don’t want to say too much for those who haven’t read the book, but let’s just say the husband is awful.

For other challenges
Call the Midwife by Jennifer Worth. This is a collection of stories about patience Worth cared for in 1950’s England. Most of them involve new or expectant mothers, obviously, but there were a few stories about elderly people she helped while waiting to take her final test. I thought the stories were very interesting, and some were definitely heartbreaking. It is amazing to me how far pre- and post-natal care has come in just 60 years. At the same time it is hard to imagine how things were back then since it is so different than the last 20 years while all of my friends were having kids.

I am currently reading:
Too Fat, Too Slutty, Too Loud: The Rise and Reign of the Unruly Woman for a book I saw a stranger reading in public (A3).
Tracks: A Woman's Solo Trek Across 1700 Miles of Australian Outback by Robyn Davidson
Trespassing by Brandi Reeds

QOTW: Like a few others have commented, there aren't many mothers in the books I've read. Many of them have strong female characters, but their mothers are rarely even mentioned. I do agree that Mrs. Weasley was a pretty amazing mother, and the mom in Room was so strong and brave. I also think there are 2 mothers in Beartown that would make my top 5: Abed's mom and the victim's mom.


message 21: by Diane (new)

Diane  Lupton | 136 comments My cousin and her husband came for a weekend visit this past week. I haven't seen them in 7 years! She is a reader of memoirs, biographies, and autobiographies which led to many book related discussions. They are from NJ so there was also lots of sitting in the sunshine (I'm in FL). When you live in summer weather year round you tend to lose your appreciation for it. I enjoyed sitting in the sunshine and feeling the breeze so much that I have now made it a part of my morning routine. When my time on the treadmill is done, I now get off and sit in the sunshine just breathing and listening to my audiobook until the chapter finishes instead of continuing on the treadmill. Sunshine can also do a body good. :)

I am currently reading Caroline: Little House, Revisited and loving it. I only have about 60 pages left. It will fill my novel about a real person prompt.

I have also started Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery as my audiobook while on the treadmill. He alternates chapters between his youth and how it got to be an astronaut with his year in space. I am definitely loving the space parts more because it so foreign to me. I haven't yet looked to see if this will fulfill any prompts.

12/50

QOTW
I have to go with Caroline Ingalls, better known as simply Ma from Little House on the Prairie. Probably because I loved the series so much and I am currently reading Caroline: Little House, Revisited. No one else really comes to mind. I'm guessing its because once I read a book, I see it as a whole not as the individual characters anymore.


message 22: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) | 242 comments Good morning!

I've missed a few check-ins and can't remember what I've reported here, so I'll just do the last couple I've read:

A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian by Marina Lewycka - This is a delightful, funny book about serious issues -- family, aging, immigration and deportation. The author adds more depth as the story progresses, sometimes explicitly but often through the history of tractors, which was cleverly included and surprisingly interesting. ("The early makers of the tractor dreamed that swords would be turned into ploughshares, but now the spirit of the century grows dark, and we find that, instead, ploughshares are to be turned into swords.") I used this for 9. on the advanced list, a book about a problem facing society today (immigration and deportation).

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng - I read this for my real life book club, which is the only reason I finished it. The group was pretty divided - some people enjoyed it a lot, but I was not one of them. I found the writing style to be flat and unexpressive and the characters to be more types than real people. Someone in the Popsugar group pointed out that it has a Halloween party in it (thank you!), so I'm using it for 29. A book about or set on Halloween. It fits other prompts, too, but I've already filled those and I want credit for sticking with this to the end! ;)

I'm a little more than half-way through Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore for 7. on the advanced list, A book by an author with the same first or last name as you. It wasn't at all what I was expecting, but I'm curious to see how the mystery gets resolved.

QOTW: I can't think of any! I like the Mrs. Weasley suggestion, so I'll go with that.


message 23: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6885 comments Mod
Kenya wrote: "... Fragile Things: Short Fictions and Wonders -- What the heck did I just read... I'd been looking forward to diving into more of Neil Gaiman's work (I previously read and liked The Ocean at the End of the Lane) but now I'm not sure if I want to continue reading his stuff. Some of the short stories in here were good, but others... does he have some bizarre sexual hangups or what? ..."


Haha I like his comic book series Sandman and his novels a lot more than his short story collections. This book was ... odd. I have this note in my review of it:
And a final note: There are more mentions of penises in this collection than in any other Gaiman work I've read. It was a little startling, because I don't expect it from him.



message 24: by Sara (new)

Sara | 1508 comments Tara wrote: I want to shout out to the adoptive and foster moms in literature; Marilla Cuthbert (Anne of Green Gables)"

Marilla came to mind for me as well! She definitely deserves some attention for taking on Anne and rising to the challenge so magnificently :)


message 25: by SarahKat (new)

SarahKat | 163 comments Good morning!
I finished 3 books this week:

The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafón for set in a bookstore or library. https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...
Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris for LGBT protagonist. Loved it! https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...
The Wide Window by Lemony Snicket - audio with son, not for the challenge

QOTW:
Everyone is saying Molly Weasley and I whole-heartedly agree. I also must say Celeste and Jane from Big Little Lies. They are just so well-written; so human.


message 26: by Kenya (new)

Kenya Starflight | 743 comments Nadine wrote: "Haha I like his comic book series Sandman and his novels a lot more than his short story collections. This book was ... odd."

Glad to know I wasn't the only one who found this book head-tiltingly bizarre at times. I still plan on giving his novels a chance (especially American Gods and his YA novels), but maybe I need to avoid the story collections. Maybe I'm just still squicked out by "The Problem of Susan," which inserts some needless icky sexual content into "The Chronicles of Narnia" of all things...


message 27: by SadieReadsAgain (new)

SadieReadsAgain (sadiestartsagain) | 767 comments I had an awesome reading week this week, mainly in part to dipping my toes in to my first ever Dewey's 24hr Readathon! I got three books finished, one book continued and two books started in the 24hrs.

So PS Challenge-wise, I'm now at 18/50 (16/40, 2/10)!

First up was Not That Kind of Girl: A Young Woman Tells You What She's "Learned" for prompt 37 book you meant to read in 2017. I used this prompt as a way to get a book off my current reading list. I started it at the end of 2016 but never finished in in 2017 because I discovered the Popsugar Challenge and it didn't fit any of the prompts! My feelings on it are mixed. On one hand I love that Lena Dunham puts out there things that I have also thought/done/said. I think it's important that women are reflected honestly in society, and that means even the less than perfect bits. Body image, sex, insecurities - it's brave for a woman to unashamedly own her realness. I know that's kind of her thing though, so maybe it isn't as brave for her when it's part of her brand. But it's still very exciting to me. But then on the other hand Lena has lead a life I can't fully relate to, one of connections and money and certain opportunities. And it isn't jealousy that stops me engaging with that, but something else...maybe just plain dislike. I don't know, but I did find some parts a bit of a turn off. I enjoyed it for what it was, laughed and nodded along with quite a lot of it, but I can see why other people really didn't like it. Though I don't understand this need for people to make her a scapegoat for the (appalling) under representation of POC in art. Yes, her show has contributed to it, but it's a very small fish in a whopping great big ocean and I don't think it means the other things she has to say are not valid. One voice can't say everything, and there are ways to open the eyes of those in the position to make changes without attacking them.

Next was Everyday Sexism for advanced prompt 9 a problem facing society. What an important book. I was appalled and saddened by the accounts I read, but not at all surprised. Anyone who thinks we don't need equality or feminism really needs to read this book...but sadly they are the sort of people who never will. Still, it fills me with hope that there are voices out there like this, and that so many of us (men as well as women) have not given up. This book is so accessible, with personal stories, tweets and facts built in to each of the very well written chapters. Chapters which cover every prominent issue that sexism taints, for both men and women. A really powerful book.

Finally, it was The Tenant of Wildfell Hall for prompt 11 female author who uses a male pseudonym. On the Bronte scale I'd say it's better than Wuthering Heights but not as good as Jane Eyre. I loved the strong female role. Which is strange as I didn't agree with the choices she made in the later stages of the book, and her piety made me want to slap her. Still, time and context play a part, and she was very brave with how she chose to live her life. I just wish the story hadn't been told from the male perspective. But it was a good book with some nice twists, and a lot of the insights still apply today.


message 28: by Sheri (last edited May 03, 2018 08:43AM) (new)

Sheri | 793 comments Morning everyone!

This week has been suddenly summer, which is weird after all the "still winter" of last month. I guess spring is more of a suggestion. I don't mind too much though, I embrace the heat.

This week I finished:

The Red Tent - this is my bestseller from the year I graduated high school. I was really unimpressed with the selection I had to choose from, this seemed like the most likely to be interesting. I did like it more than I expected, but it was way more birthing and mensuration than I really want in my fiction. I enjoyed the references to Sumarian mythology and such though, and it was very well written. I enjoyed coming at the familiar story of Joseph from the women's perspective, where Joseph was more of an afterthought, and not really that great of a person. I'm also counting it for my literary fiction for ATY.

Children of Blood and Bone - This is my book with alliteration in the title. I'd been wanting to read this since I first heard about it coming out. It didn't disappoint! While it was heartbreaking in parts, it was so engrossing I couldn't put it down, once I got going. (it took a while to get going due to having a friend stay over for the weekend, so not getting much read time while i was trying to get going). I'm also counting it for ATY's book with body parts in the title.

Currently reading:

Turtles All the Way Down - I actually forgot this was the group read. My friend just couldn't stop talking about the book when it came out and i finally decided to just give it a try. It's good so far, and and going quickly. Nice to have a shorter read after the thicker books.

I'm at 31/50

QOTW: I find that mothers don't really stand out to me, I know that sounds kind of terrible. I mean when people point them out, I can say "oh yeah, I agree" but when I try to think of "What mothers are great" my mind draws a blank. the only one I could really think of was Boneshaker where Briar braves the walled city of Seattle to find her son. I totally forgot until I was writing this post that The Red Tent was full of mothers, and they were all written as strong mother figures. And I just read it last week. I like Molly Weasley, but I agree with Brittany, that I found her kind of smothering. I also agree that the mom in The Hate U Give was great.


message 29: by Tara (new)

Tara Nichols (tarajoy90) | 167 comments Happy Thursday everyone! It's Day 6 of the Teacher Walkout in Arizona, so it's been a weird week. I teach part-time at a public school, so I've spent a little bit of time down at the state capitol, but not nearly as much as the many, many extraordinarily dedicated teachers that have been there day and night for days. I have two teacher friends who were up all night at the capitol last night watching the education bill being debated. We're not getting what we wanted, but I'm still hopeful we'll get something and be able to go back to work (then vote much of the legislature out in November).

But anyway, I read a lot this week and participated in the readathon for the first time, and even got my 7-year-old involved.

Finished
The Tenant of Wildfell Hall (11. female author with male pseudonym) I loved this so much. It is right up there with Jane Eyre for me.

The Invention of Hugo Cabret (1. book made into a movie I've seen) During the readathon, my 7-year-old daughter and I listened to this on audiobook and followed along in the hardback. We both loved it. The drawings are beautiful and the story is heartfelt and compelling.

The Phantom Tollbooth (Adv 6. allegory) Meh. I think maybe I'm just not into allegories. It was well written and creative, but I just never really got into it or cared what happened.

Blood Brothers: The Dramatic Story of a Palestinian Christian Working for Peace in Israel (non-challenge) Read this book in preparation for my upcoming trip to Israel Palestine and I'm so glad I did. Chacour's story is heartbreaking and important, and there is so much work still to do.

Everybody, Always: Becoming Love in a World Full of Setbacks and Difficult People (34. book published in 2018) I listened to this on audiobook. Bob Goff might be one of the world's most likable people. He's so great and his stories made me both laugh and cry. What more could you ask for?

Progress
30/52 (25/42 regular, 5/10 advanced)

DNF
How did I not know that The Picture of Dorian Gray was a straight-up horror novel?!?!? I don't read horror novels because I'm really sensitive to violent imagery. But I read this. I mean, I've read Oscar Wilde before and it was not like this - at all. I made it 73% through, and then something horrifying happened. I felt sick to my stomach, put it down, read the remaining plot summary on Wikipedia, and decided I was done. I will say though, I think he accomplished what he was going for, so if you like horror and have never read this classic, give it a go.

Currently reading
Big Little Lies (32. Celebrity book club)
The Day the World Came to Town: 9/11 in Gander, Newfoundland (13. Book that is also a play)
The Cloister Walk (Adv 1. bestseller from year I graduated HS - 1996)

QOTW
I think these have already been mentioned, but of the books I've read recently, I really liked Marilla from Anne of Green Gables, Miss Honey from Matilda, and the mom in The Hate U Give.


message 30: by Kristina (last edited May 03, 2018 09:16AM) (new)

Kristina (baronessekat) | 111 comments I ripped through quite a few books this week. Helps when you are on a car trip that takes almost 20 hours round trip and you put the audiobook playback at 1.25 speed.

finished
River of Teeth (River of Teeth, #1) by Sarah Gailey River of Teeth for your favorite category from the 2016 reading challenge - book you can read in a day

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde for book that is also a stage play or musical

Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore (Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore, #1) by Robin Sloan Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore for book that takes place in a bookstore or library

Artemis by Andy Weir Artemis for YOUR FAVORITE PROMPT FROM THE 2017 POPSUGAR READING CHALLENGES (audiobook)

currently reading

Amish Zombies from Space (Peril in Plain Space #2) by Kerry Nietz Amish Zombies from Space for book set on another planet

The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden by Jonas Jonasson The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden for book tied to your ancestry.

QOTW

I think I have to agree with Molly Weasley for my favorite mom in books.


message 31: by SadieReadsAgain (new)

SadieReadsAgain (sadiestartsagain) | 767 comments In honor of mothers everywhere, who is your favorite literary mom?

I don't know that I have a favourite, but I loved the mother-son relationship in Night Song of the Last Tram - A Glasgow Childhood. She was a very strong and funny woman. I also like Vianne in Chocolat.


message 32: by Sara (new)

Sara | 1508 comments Tara wrote: "How did I not know that The Picture of Dorian Gray was a straight-up horror novel?!?!? I don't read horror novels because I'm really sensitive to violent imagery. But I read this. I mean, I've read Oscar Wilde before and it was not like this - at all. I made it 73% through, and then something horrifying happened. I felt sick to my stomach, put it down, read the remaining plot summary on Wikipedia, and decided I was done. I will say though, I think he accomplished what he was going for, so if you like horror and have never read this classic, give it a go.
"


Hmm...this gives me pause. This book has been on my shelf for a while, and I just haven't gotten around to it. I'm not big on horror so now I want to go peek at Wikipedia to see if it's something I can handle (even if I do spoil it for myself!)


message 33: by Christy (new)

Christy | 351 comments Hello everyone!
I finished The Stranger Beside Me: Ted Bundy The Shocking Inside Story last night, and now I get to take a break from scary true crime! Next up is a werewolf romance titled Baby, I'm Howling for You, which should be really silly and fun and not make me sad about the state of humanity or worry about having my window ajar.
I've been trying a bunch of audiobooks lately, and being really dissatisfied with them. I realized that I have little tolerance for bad writing or narrating in audiobooks (maybe because I can't skim?), so I've decided to go with classics. I'm listening to The Woman in White and really enjoying it. Unsurprisingly, it's really sexist, but it is suspenseful, and I do enjoy the wordiness of Victorian prose. Hooray for finding something I like!
QOTW: I have very strong feelings about Marilla Cuthbert, and I must say that I find Mrs. Bennett to be a little maligned. She's a woman who did what she was supposed to and married a sensible man and bore him a bunch of children, and then because she's not very educated and none of those children happened to be boys, she's cast as having somehow failed in her marriage? Mr. Bennett basically says he married her because she was pretty and only later did he notice he didn't like her personality! His bad! And THEN we're supposed to judge her for being a bit mercenary when she and everyone else knows that her children MUST marry well if the family is to survive; meanwhile Mr. Bennett is just...sitting in his library regretting he didn't have sons and judging other people? Mrs. Bennett actually takes action for her kids, and gets no thanks at all for it.
The defense rests.


message 34: by SadieReadsAgain (new)

SadieReadsAgain (sadiestartsagain) | 767 comments Brooke wrote: "...Call the Midwife by Jennifer Worth. This is a collection of stories about patience Worth cared for in 1950’s England. Most of them involve new or expectant mothers, obviously, but there were a few stories about elderly people she helped while waiting to take her final test. I thought the stories were very interesting, and some were definitely heartbreaking. It is amazing to me how far pre- and post-natal care has come in just 60 years. At the same time it is hard to imagine how things were back then since it is so different than the last 20 years while all of my friends were having kids..."

I see you're in the US so I don't know how easy it would be for you to get hold of, but this has been turned into a major BBC tv series. I think it's in something like it's sixth season. Obviously it's far outgrown the book, and the 50's in general - the latest season was set in the 60's. It's a great cast and I love it so much. There is a Christmas special each year too.


message 35: by SadieReadsAgain (new)

SadieReadsAgain (sadiestartsagain) | 767 comments Sara wrote: "Tara wrote: "How did I not know that The Picture of Dorian Gray was a straight-up horror novel?!?!? I don't read horror novels because I'm really sensitive to violent imagery. But I read this. I me..."

I read this a couple of years ago, so maybe I'm remembering it wrong. But I'm not a horror reader, and this book is one of my favourites so I don't think I found it too shocking. Obviously it's a personal thing, but just for balance.


message 36: by Fannie (new)

Fannie D'Ascola | 418 comments Bonjour,

We are having rainy days here but at least it's not cold anymore.

Two books read last week:

Welcome to Night Vale for a book by two authors. I will try again the podcast. It was weird anf funny, but should have ended a bit before.

Artemis Fowl for the heist prompt, now that I know the signification of that word. It was just ok.

I am now reading:

Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell for another group read and don't know if it will fit the challenge.

Northanger Abbey because I am rereading Jane Austen. It wasn't my favorite, but I'll see what I think of it few years later.

QOTW: The first that came to my mind was Marmee in Little Women.


message 37: by Aida (new)

Aida (taffymyametalumi) I got to read a lot of amazing books this month, especially because of spring break! Here's the blog post where I talk about all of them:

https://theninethrealm.blogspot.com/2...

QOTW: Hmm, this is a tough one. I'm gonna have to say Tris' mom from 'Divergent.' She's so selfless, a true Abnegation, but she's really brave too like the Dauntless.


message 38: by Tara (new)

Tara Nichols (tarajoy90) | 167 comments Sarah wrote: I read this a couple of years ago, so maybe I'm remembering it wrong. But I'm not a horror reader, and this book is one of my favourites so I don't think I found it too shocking. Obviously it's a personal thing, but just for balance.

You are so right Sarah - it's definity a personal thing. I'm ultra-sensitive, and I went in not expecting anything horror-related, so I think my shock was a combination of my expectations and my high sensitivity. I wouldn't tell someone not to read it, because I think it is masterfully done, but I would caution people who might be as sensitive as me. And thank you for your perspective!


message 39: by Larissa (new)

Larissa Langsather (langsather) Good morning! Looks like a nice day today!

Not too much to report. I finished:
The Joy Luck Club (author with a different ethnicity)- it was a reread but I loved it just as much
One Crazy Summer (separate Newbery Challenge)- now this is an example of a NOT so good mother which I guess makes for better reading and maybe a question of who is the worst literary mother, this was a great eye opening book though!

Currently reading:
Left Behind Series for the prompt book with 2 authors and I have been wanting to finish this series especially when Desecration was one of the top sellers the year I graduated (fulfilling another prompt!) I know these aren't necessarily well written but these were my first "grownup" books and I have been curious about the ending. It has been a long time and I just don't have the energy to worry about what my fellow English Majors think any more.
Turtles All the Way Down (a book about mental health and group read for May)- only just started, sounds good and looking forward to it

QotW: I agree that Molly Weasley and Ma (Caroline Ingalls) are some of the best literary moms, but slightly more recently I have loved the moms Isabel Pullman (Wonder) and Lisa Carter (The Hate U Give). The most normal down to earth mom I also love is Mrs. Quimby from the Ramona Series. Now who is the worst mom in literary? That could go on for days!


message 40: by Miriam (new)

Miriam | 154 comments Hi from (currently) sunny Germany,

I finished Black Star Nairobi: Roman this week. Interesting Setting (current Kenya and a bit US) and hard-boiled crime novel (though I am not sure about the genre specifics it seems that it fits). Could be used for the country that fascinates you, book about death or grief, next book in a series, author of a differen ethnicity, favourite Color (if it is black), problem facing society (terrorism, corruption in politics, ...)
You Can Never Find a Rickshaw When It Monsoons: The World on One Cartoon a Day which I thought would be way funnier than it was.
Zuckerfrei: Die 40 Tage-Challenge which focuses on avoiding sugar for 40 days (and supposedly even longer, your whole life?) I liked it, but I am not as radical. but it does contain good recipes and interesting information.
Finde deinen Style!: Und fühle dich endlich wohl mit dir selbst a very positive book about style and body-positivity.

Currently reading:
The Ship of Brides;
In Afrika ist immer August: sechzig Schulaufsätze neapolitanischer Kinder
Gray (Audio)

QOTW:
I was tempted to say Molly Weasley, whom I like a lot, like so many of you.
However, I do think her role is a tad too traditional in certain ways (she doesn't have an outside job, she does the household chores and takes care of the kids (mainly)).
I do like a few of the not-so-perfect mothers, e.g. Irene Huss in the novels by Helene Tursten e.g. Detective Inspector Huss, also Maria Kallio in Death Spiral and others. But I do agree with some of you, that it is not so easy to remember the mothers as such from the novels I've read.
Since motherhood is a sensitive subject issue for me, I sometimes tend to avoid books that focus on that aspect.


message 41: by Sara (new)

Sara | 1508 comments Christy wrote: "QOTW: I have very strong feelings about Marilla Cuthbert, and I must say that I find Mrs. Bennett to be a little maligned. She's a woman who did what she was supposed to and married a sensible man and bore him a bunch of children, and then because she's not very educated and none of those children happened to be boys, she's cast as having somehow failed in her marriage? Mr. Bennett basically says he married her because she was pretty and only later did he notice he didn't like her personality! His bad! And THEN we're supposed to judge her for being a bit mercenary when she and everyone else knows that her children MUST marry well if the family is to survive; meanwhile Mr. Bennett is just...sitting in his library regretting he didn't have sons and judging other people? Mrs. Bennett actually takes action for her kids, and gets no thanks at all for it.
The defense rests."


Very well defended! I actually have some sympathy for poor Mrs. Bennett after reading your argument in her favor :)


message 42: by Sara (new)

Sara | 1508 comments Larissa wrote: "Now who is the worst mom in literary? That could go on for days!"

Maybe Nadine can use that for next week's QOTW! That would be a really interesting discussion!


message 43: by Christy (new)

Christy | 351 comments Sarah wrote: "Brooke wrote: "...Call the Midwife by Jennifer Worth. This is a collection of stories about patience Worth cared for in 1950’s England. Most of them involve new or expectant mothers, obviously, but..."

Hi Sarah! It's on Netflix in the US, and I watch it whenever I'm feeling down. Nobody does nostalgia like the Brits, nobody.


message 44: by Anne (new)

Anne (annefullercoxnet) | 203 comments This has been my slowest reading week in years. I don't even know why. Usually if I don't finish six or seven books in a week I can point to something (visitors, vacation, choir concerts every night, you all know). This week there is just nothing. I have no idea were my reading time went. I finished two children's chapter books and an audio book. I am shaking my head as I write this.

I read:
The Doughnut Fix- a boy gets uprooted from NYC to a small town (really small) and goes on a quest for the best chocolate cream doughnuts he has ever tasted. It is a really good book about moving.
Hope in the Holler- this book could be great, it could also be awful for people who have had bad fostering situations. It could hit all sorts of triggers.
Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood- this was my first experience with audible and I loved it. I am aware the narrator (author) was amazing, but I also enjoyed "reading" while I got my bathroom scrubbed.

QOTW: I am with Heather, the mom is usually not there or a major piece of the conflict. The thing I like about Marilla Cuthburt is that she isn't the perfect mom. I love that she mellows. When Anne comes Marilla is so strict and uptight you think she is the conflict, by the time Dora and Davey show up she has relaxed enough that she can even laugh at some of Davey's antics. As a mom, I have seen that progression in myself. It is the whole pacifier on the floor example. With your oldest when the pacifier falls on the floor you sterilize it, by your fourth when the pacifier falls on the floor you lick it off and give it back to the baby. Not the best mothering technique, I know but at least by the fourth I could handle the bigger issues with more grace (I hope).

Happy Reading!


message 45: by Carmen (last edited May 03, 2018 10:31AM) (new)

Carmen (TheReadingTrashQueen) (thereadingtrashqueen) | 908 comments Tara wrote: "How did I not know that The Picture of Dorian Gray was a straight-up horror novel?!?!? I don't read horror novels because I'm really sensitive to violent imagery. But I read this. I mean, I've read Oscar Wilde before and it was not like this - at all. I made it 73% through, and then something horrifying happened. I felt sick to my stomach, put it down, read the remaining plot summary on Wikipedia, and decided I was done. I will say though, I think he accomplished what he was going for, so if you like horror and have never read this classic, give it a go."

Well, I didn't know either, so you're not alone haha! Thanks for mentioning it, though, so I know what I'll be getting into (hopefully) this year! I don't mind horror much, but it's good to know what I can expect.


message 46: by Carol (new)

Carol Roote | 116 comments Kenya wrote: "Happy Thursday!

I read NO books from the challenge this week... but that didn't stop me from reading a few shorter books that weren't for the challenge. I figure I have until the end of the year t..."


Honestly, Gaiman's book of short stories Trigger Warning: Short Fictions and Disturbances was MUCH better than Fragile Things: Short Fictions and Wonders.


message 47: by Carmen (new)

Carmen (TheReadingTrashQueen) (thereadingtrashqueen) | 908 comments Hello all!

Here in the Netherlands we've had lots of sun and heat, and also quite a bit of rain and storm. Also near freezing during the night. Clearly the weather doesn't know which way is up anymore. I am expecting to get a cold soon haha!

I had a terrible reading week, even with the readathon. The only books read were during those 24 hours, actually. I managed to read 1,5 with a total of 571 pages. I've been so busy (work, appointments, King's Day, and today alone a work meeting, dentist, and vet), and then the last few nights I spent my time reading fanfiction. Because I needed it (much stress over bunnies and exhaustion). I managed to read over 200k though, so that should count for something. I just had to know if Tony was going to be okay, so there were some very late nights/early mornings. Woops.

Luckily, the one book I did read and finish, counts for the challenge (I know. It's been a while ha), so I am now at 21/52 (16/43, 5/10) and 32/75 for my GR challenge. I suppose I'm still on schedule, but it's still nagging at me. I need to focus on the challenge again, but with the books I've got now from the library, it might be a bit tricky. I think two will fit prompts, though, so I guess it could be worse.

Finished
Jamrach's Menagerie for a book set at sea. Sorry, Odyssey, you're gonna have to wait. Again. This book was.. wow. It was way intenser than I had expected it to be, but then again I had no real clue what I was getting into. I just saw a pretty cover, and a boat, and going by the summary I hoped it would be set at sea enough to count. It did, easily. It did kinda spoil the end of Moby-Dick & In The Heart of the Sea for me but luckily I've already forgotten the names, so hopefully it won't take too much from it when I finally get to it. I just did not expect (view spoiler). I really enjoyed it though, I thought it was very good!

Currently reading
Uncommon Type: Some Stories - obviously I'm still reading this. I didn't read in it for the readathon, so it's been waiting for me to get back to it and read a story. Hopefully I'll manage to do that soon.

The Bear and the Nightingale - Don't think this will be for a prompt. I could say Russia fascinates me, but in truth it despises me, and I can't lie heh. I have a little under 100 pages left to go, and I hope I will be able to focus enough tonight to finish it. So far I'm not too sure why everyone loves this book so much. It's not bad, not at all, but so far for me it's just... okay sounds too negative, but perhaps just good? I'm just not fond of the way women are treated/seen, but I suppose that's what it was like. I guess I've read too much of that lately. Maybe it's my fatigue that's making me feel this way, and of course lots can happen in 100 pages, so who knows how I'll feel at the end!

I really hope I'll be able to read more this upcoming week (gonna see if we can find a new ladyfriend for my oldest gentlebunny as we had to split him from my other two bunnies, keep an eye on the younger gentlebunny -we went to the vet today because he wasn't eating, which is very dangerous; a bunny needs to eat or he'll die, like in 24 hours- and if that works out I have to couple them and keep an eye on them, then there is the shopping trip, movienight/sleepover with a friend of mine, and work), but once again I am really busy. I won't have proper time to rest until Wednesday, and when you're chronically fatigued, that's not a good thing haha! Watch me crash on Tuesday night xD.
I suppose I could always opt out of going out with the family on Sunday for a shopping trip, but I've been really looking forward to it, so I really don't want to do that. I love spending my day with my dad and uncle, having drinks in the sun while waiting for the (other) women to come back heh. At least I have no plans to see Infinity War for a third time, so I suppose that counts for something.

ANYWAYS, enough rambling (apologies), on to the QOTW
I agree with Molly Weasley, and with everyone saying mothers are hard to remember, if there at all. I also want to mention Cersei Lannister from A Song of Ice and Fire, because while she may be a terrible person, she is a mother who would do anything, fight anyone, to protect her kids.


message 48: by Brittany (last edited May 03, 2018 08:31PM) (new)

Brittany Morrison | 144 comments I only finished two books for the challenge this week.

Black Panther #1-I've been reading more comics and graphic novels this year and decided on this one for a book with an animal in the title. It was a quick read. Honestly not my favorite, but I think that's only because I don't want there to be strife in Wakanda.

The Good Nurse: A True Story of Medicine, Madness, and Murder - This was my true crime read. It was a very interesting read, but I feel like I still do not know what possessed this nurse to kill so many. It seems like the why was never really addressed. He seemingly had no motive and was not deemed 'crazy' or 'insane'.


I had started reading A Girl Like That for the prompt a book published in 2018. I didn’t think I would get it finished today, but I did, so I actually ended up finishing three books this week.


message 49: by Carol (new)

Carol Roote | 116 comments Hello!

Finished this week:
The Secret History for #30 A book with characters who are twins. The story was interesting, but I could have done without so much drinking and drugs among the college students.

Currently Reading:
Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking for #35 A past Goodreads Choice Award Winner

Sorry to Disrupt the Peace for a real life book club but I can't think of any prompt in which it will fit, except a book about mental health, which I've already read

How Dare the Sun Rise: Memoirs of a War Child for another real life book club; again, I don't think it will fit any prompt, since I've already read all the prompts I can think of in which it would fit

I have a whole stack of books to read this month, but I daughter read The Catcher in the Rye for school and loved it. She put it on the top of my TBR pile, so I guess I'm reading it next. LOL

QOTW:
This is a very tough question, because most of the mothers in the books I usually read are just a little bit off and seem to be warnings about the kind of mother NOT to be. However, I'd like to mention somebody that I don't think anyone above mentioned. Ruth Jefferson in Small Great Things.


message 50: by Tania (new)

Tania | 574 comments I am still 30/50 for the challenge. I only finished 1 book this week, which I hated - A Million Ways to Die in the West. Did not, and do not plan to, watch the movie. Completely regrettable choice for the only book I made it through this week.

I'm currently reading:
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (just got this back on my Libby, I was halfway done when my loan ran out last time and had to wait on all the other holds)

Momentum: Pursuing God's Blessings Through the Beatitudes - I was supposed to finish this in April for a non-fiction challenge but I got sidetracked. It's an in-depth look at the Beatitudes. I am enjoying the read, but it's not the kind of book I can just sit and read through, I need time to absorb.

QOTW: Another vote for Ma Ingalls here, she was always a comforting presence. It's easier to find the good ones in children's literature, like The Happy Hollisters and the Mystery of the Midnight Trollsand Beezus and Ramona. For non-human mothers, my vote goes to Black Beauty, because his mother did a good job raising him before they were separated. This list would be easier for Father's Day - there are more fathers in the books I read than there are mothers, apparently. These poor mothers have no shot, they are forever being killed off.


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