Military Science Fiction discussion

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Looking for Extremely Hard Military Sci-Fi

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message 1: by Rikhard (last edited May 03, 2018 02:23AM) (new)

Rikhard Von Katzen (rikhardvkatzen) | 3 comments Lately I've been looking for hard science fiction in general, but I'd especially like to read some diamond-hard military science fiction - something only slightly more speculative than World War 2, on the mohs Scale of Sci-Fi hardness. 99% of science fiction includes something which is not only unlikely but almost certainly impossible (i.e., FTL travel) and this doesn't exclude supposedly hard-science fiction writers. Even when they can resist using magical teleportation spells (called 'jump drives') they tend to have all sorts of hyper-speculative-probably-impossible stuff like collapsed star matter, force fields, acceleration compensators, artificial gravity, etc. etc. It seems most science fiction authors just can't stick to the science and feel compelled to get into really Woo^ territory when writing fiction, even if they're known as 'hard' science fiction writers.

This is especially acute when dealing with military science fiction. Almost all of it has magical technology which can not help but radically alter how the space combat works (even assuming it's internally consistent, which is often questionable). I would love to read some military science fiction with absolutely zero magic, no FTL, no unobtanium powered thrusters, no gravity sorcery that allows humans to survive 1,000G accelerations - something like the literary equivalent of "Children of a Dead Earth" where perfectly realistic tin-can space ships move at each other under microgravity thrust and lob rail-cannon shots at each other from light-second distances and explode after a couple of hits. Is there anything like this? Because I have read to a lot of sci-fi, a lot of hard sci-fi, and a lot of military sci-fi and I have yet to find anything that seems like anything likely to ever happen in actual space using real machines built according to the known laws of physics.


message 2: by Jason (new)

Jason A. | 1 comments You could try my book, Counter-Zombie Warfare. It doesn't fit exactly into what you're looking for, but there's nothing "magical," aside from the zombies themselves. I subscribe to the disease-model of the undead, which is why I classify the book as Science Fiction, but I concede that walking cannibal corpses is pretty far fetched. There is no "space" aspect. The world is near-present. Everything aside from the undead is purely logical. Combat is based on my infantry training, only converted to apply to zombies instead of people. Maybe it's close to what you're looking for. Then again, maybe not.


message 3: by Colin (last edited May 04, 2018 04:30AM) (new)

Colin | 76 comments I recommend the Heritage trilogy, Legacy trilogy, and Inheritance trilogy, by Ian Douglas. Supposedly three separate "trilogies", it is actually a single, millenia-spanning story line, and it is awesome. And the Star Carrier series, also by Ian Douglas. Plenty of heart-pounding combat action, and also generous helpings of cutting-edge astrophysics. Both these series definitely qualify as both military SF and hard SF.


message 4: by Rikhard (new)

Rikhard Von Katzen (rikhardvkatzen) | 3 comments Colin wrote: "I recommend the Heritage trilogy, Legacy trilogy, and Inheritance trilogy, by Ian Douglas. Supposedly three separate "trilogies", it is actually a single, millenia-spanning story line, and it is aw..."

Sounds interesting, I'm looking into it right now.


message 5: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy Lats (jjlatimer) | 2 comments Colin wrote: "I recommend the Heritage trilogy, Legacy trilogy, and Inheritance trilogy, by Ian Douglas. Supposedly three separate "trilogies", it is actually a single, millenia-spanning story line, and it is aw..."

I really need to re-read this series! I loved the science and tech. The gravitational point-source for the drives blew my mind. Best can-opener ever, iirc


message 6: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy Lats (jjlatimer) | 2 comments Not really mil but James P Hogan's Inherit the Stars is pretty amazing. They find a dead astronaut on the moon and try to figure out where he came from.


message 7: by Rikhard (new)

Rikhard Von Katzen (rikhardvkatzen) | 3 comments Jimmy wrote: "Colin wrote: "I recommend the Heritage trilogy, Legacy trilogy, and Inheritance trilogy, by Ian Douglas. Supposedly three separate "trilogies", it is actually a single, millenia-spanning story line..."

I noticed that Winchell Chung of Atomic Rockets also recommends this series, which is about the strongest recommendation you can get for 'no BS sci-fi'.


message 8: by Ron (new)

Ron Friedman | 1 comments You can try my WWII time-travel thriller - Typhoon Time.

Modern Russian submarine travels back in time to 1938 in an attempt to stop the war and the holocaust.

The book was published by WordFire press and it's an Amazon.ca #1 bestseller in time travel.


message 9: by Matt (new)

Matt Thomas | 1 comments I've been reading Planetside by Mammen. It's extremely true-to-life in terms of the overall military experience. To be frank, it's a little too true-to-life. I've been in the military for 10 years, and a lot of the things he talks about are things that I've dealt with daily, like investigations, moves, unit politics etc. The good news is the same thing that slows it down for me is the same thing that would keep another reader going. It's just too much like work.

I'd also recommend mine - "The Oppressed." I used to work in Special Operations and the novel is about a Special Forces team sent to liberate an alien-occupied Earth. It's based heavily on my experiences in Afghanistan.


message 10: by Br1cht (new)

Br1cht | 5 comments I really recommend Edmond Barrett´s The Nameless War series has a very grounded feel to it and is one of my personal favorites.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1...


message 11: by Br1cht (new)

Br1cht | 5 comments Two of the Great of our Time have done a collab(Govenor by David Weber&Richard Fox) and discuss on this podcast.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NP4oD...


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