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Picture of the Day > May 2018

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message 1: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

De jockey, 1899
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (French 1864-1901)
Litho on paper
No dimensions given
Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, Netherlands


message 2: by Ruth (last edited May 03, 2018 09:12AM) (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments This is great. How effectively he uses line, angle, and perspective to pull the eye left to right and emphasize the forward motion.


message 3: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments What? No brothels?


message 4: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl I agree, Ruth. This picture immediately made me happy.


message 5: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments Me, too.


message 6: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Big Race, 2001
Clarice Smith (American b. 1933)
Oil on canvas
36 1/2 x 76 1/2 in. (92.7 x 194.3 cm)
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.


message 7: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Lyrical, 1911
Wassily Kandinsky (Russian 1866-1944)
Oil on canvas
130 x 94 cm.
Museum Boijmans, Rotterdam, Netherlands


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 95 comments Horse racing theme this month?

All three are gorgeous and give a feeling of movement.


message 9: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments I much prefer Kandinsky


message 10: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Horse, 1967
Elisabeth Frink (British 1930-1993)
Lithograph on paper
77.8 x 59.4 cm
Tate Collection


message 11: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments Reminds me a bit of the horse in Guernica.


message 12: by Amalie (new)

Amalie  | 157 comments ah, horses!


message 13: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Cabalette, 2003
Linde Ivimey (Australian b. 1965)
Pewter, bone, silk, fibre, steel
78.3 × 75.2 × 23.0 cm
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne


message 14: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

The Fall of Anarchy (?), ca. 1833-34
J.M.W. Turner (British 1775-1851)
Oil on canvas
59.7 x 75.6 cm
Tate Collection

Although possibly incomplete, the subject can be identified as Death, the last of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse who announce the Day of Judgement (Book of Revelation). (view spoiler)


message 15: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments Took me a long time to read this image.


message 16: by Amalie (last edited May 08, 2018 05:41AM) (new)

Amalie  | 157 comments The horseman is wearing a crown, I think.

It looks like a cross between Dickens' "The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come" and a creature from Alien franchise.


message 17: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Amalie, I was thinking more like the Lord of the Rings. Particularly the scene when Gandalf transmutes to the White.


message 18: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Frinks horse is incredible. Nice to see she limited the rider and extolled the horse.


message 19: by Lobstergirl (last edited May 08, 2018 06:14PM) (new)

Lobstergirl

Two Horses in a Landscape, c. 1490
Hans Memling (Flemish c. 1433-1494)
Oil on panel
16 x 43 cm.
Museum Boijmans, Rotterdam, Netherlands

"This was probably the right hand panel of a diptych showing an allegory of love. The left hand panel, (view spoiler)


message 20: by Amalie (new)

Amalie  | 157 comments Geoffrey wrote: "Amalie, I was thinking more like the Lord of the Rings. Particularly the scene when Gandalf transmutes to the White."

: )


message 21: by Amalie (new)

Amalie  | 157 comments Two Horses in a Landscape

Lobstergirl, I hope you don't mind me sharing the complete diptych.



If this is an allegory of love, then the two horses and the monkey she is looking at, have to be the symbol for the man she's in love with.

What was the Flemings view about monkeys during the 15th century? Or white horses?


message 22: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

The Riding School in Saumur, 1964
Andre Brasilier (French b. 1929)
Oil on canvas
130 x 162 cm.
Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg


message 23: by Deborah (new)

Deborah Ideiosepius | 136 comments I really like that Brasilier! the way the four sets of horses give such a vivid sense of motion, and the fade to while legs focus the vision inward to the center of the painting...


message 24: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Cantering to the Post, 1949
William Roberts (British 1895-1980)
Oil on canvas
61 x 50.8 cm
Tate Collection


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 95 comments I really like the one in message #22. Something about the uniformity...


message 26: by Lobstergirl (last edited May 13, 2018 08:39PM) (new)

Lobstergirl

Monekana, 2001
Deborah Butterfield (American b. 1949)
Bronze
96 x 129 1/2 x 63 1/2 in. (243.8 x 328.9 x 161.3 cm)
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.


message 27: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments I love Butterfields horses. I’ve seen some of them in person.


message 28: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "Monekana, 2001
Deborah Butterfield (American b. 1949)
Bronze
96 x 129 1/2 x 63 1/2 in. (243.8 x 328.9 x 161.3 cm)
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C."


Wait, that's really bronze? It looks like wood....
Which if it is wood, that is pretty incredible how she could visualize the piece to put it together.


message 29: by Amalie (new)

Amalie  | 157 comments Heather wrote: "Lobstergirl wrote: "Monekana, 2001
Deborah Butterfield (American b. 1949)
Bronze..."

Wait, that's really bronze? It looks like wood....


I don't think it's complete metal. I see wood. If it IS complete metal, then it's amazing how she has altered the metal to appear as wood. It looks so authentic.


message 30: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl It's bronze, cast from wood.


message 31: by Lobstergirl (last edited May 14, 2018 08:45PM) (new)

Lobstergirl

The Rowley Mile, Newmarket, 1929
Paul Maze (British 1887-1979)
Pastel on paper
35.5 x 70 cm
Tate Collection


message 32: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl And now for something very similar. Wait for it!


message 33: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Exercising Racehorses, ca. 1880
Edgar Degas (French)
Pastel on paper
36 x 86 cm.
Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow


message 34: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments Elegant


message 35: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl Yes, I love that Degas.


message 36: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Equestrienne, 1924
Jean Metzinger (French 1883-1956)
Oil on canvas
No dimensions given
Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, Netherlands


message 37: by Amalie (new)

Amalie  | 157 comments That's just beautiful. I love their pose (their legs). I can't decide whether it's the lady or the horse that is more elegant .


message 38: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

1. Ned Kelly, 1970-71
Sidney Nolan (British 1917–1992)
Screenprint on paper
48 x 63.8 cm
Tate Collection


message 39: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments At first glance, I thought the Metzinger a Botero. Between the color palette, the creeping obesity of the woman, I assumed it to be B´s painting. The horse too is a bit hefty.


message 40: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments I have always bee intrigued by Sidney Nolan´s work. It is slightly expressionistic but well grounded representationally. He did other paintings of Ned Kelly. The weird configuration of black metal I believe was when the Australian outlaw, Kelly, was put in iron stocks.


message 41: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Two-Tone, 1975
Susan Rothenberg (American b. 1945)
Acrylic and tempera on canvas
69 x 113 inches (175.26 x 287.02 cm)
Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York


message 42: by Deborah (new)

Deborah Ideiosepius | 136 comments Geoffrey wrote: "I have always bee intrigued by Sidney Nolan´s work. It is slightly expressionistic but well grounded representationally. He did other paintings of Ned Kelly. The weird configuration of black metal ..."

Nope. The helmet was part of the home made armour that the Kelly gang made for themselves. It didn't work too well apparently. :)
http://nationaltreasures.nla.gov.au/i...


message 43: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Thanks for clarifying that for me, Deborah. Considering the foolishness of the armor, they deserved to be caught. Now don´t tell me they never were.


message 44: by Deborah (new)

Deborah Ideiosepius | 136 comments They were caught all right, and richly deserved it for more than the armour. Ned Kelly hung.


message 45: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Was he wearing the armour when he hung? Don´t take my question seriously.


message 46: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Cavallo, 1952
Marino Marini (Italian 1901-1980)
Paint on paper on canvas
No dimensions given
Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, Netherlands




The Angel of the City, 1948
Marino Marini (Italian 1901-1980)
Bronze
Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice


message 47: by Deborah (last edited May 23, 2018 01:31AM) (new)

Deborah Ideiosepius | 136 comments Geoffrey wrote: "Was he wearing the armour when he hung? Don´t take my question seriously."

Of course he was! That made the drop faster.
ps; don't take the answer seriously either.

*ehm* sorry to seem so cavalier (and pardon the month-theme related pun here) about human life guys, but to a lot of Australians Kelly is far from a beloved character.

Really liked the Marini too; I can to an appreciation of cubist late, I have never seen that one before.


message 48: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

The Kessler Family on Horseback, 1932
Raoul Dufy (British 1877-1953)
Oil on canvas
219.5 x 267.3 cm
Tate Collection

Dufy, well known for his landscapes (view spoiler) inspired by Persian ornament.


message 49: by Heather (last edited May 24, 2018 03:39AM) (new)

Heather | 8542 comments Geoffrey wrote: "At first glance, I thought the Metzinger a Botero. Between the color palette, the creeping obesity of the woman, I assumed it to be B´s painting. The horse too is a bit hefty."

My comment is very late, as I have been lately. But, Geoffrey, what do you mean by her "creeping obesity"? She is obese? I don't want anyone painting me! One, I don't think she is that overweight, and "creeping"? I do have to add, she looks a bit pregnant. I don't know if this was intentional or not.

And I like the heftiness of the horse. It seems strong, sturdy, and immobile, as in gazing at a statue.


message 50: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "1. Ned Kelly, 1970-71
Sidney Nolan (British 1917–1992)
Screenprint on paper
48 x 63.8 cm
Tate Collection"


Geoffrey described this as "expressionistic", isn't it surreal? Or do you mean representational in the word you used 'expressionistic'? I do like it!


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