Diversity in All Forms! discussion

The Namesake
This topic is about The Namesake
34 views
Author's Pick > The Namesake (May 2018)

Comments Showing 1-15 of 15 (15 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

Mariah Roze (mariahroze) | 1430 comments Mod
The Namesake
by Jhumpa Lahiri

The Author's Pick for Jhumpa Lahiri.


NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 143 comments I read this book many years ago after I first read Interpreter of Maladies (which I adore). I really enjoy her writing style. She can describe everyday objects and actions, and make them interesting. She can imbue them with meaning. Sometimes it's the small things that reveal differences in culture.

I love her insights about people, and families. This book will feel meandering to those who are used to her short stories, but it's a nice trip. She is able go deeper into the lives of her characters, and show the changes over time.

Enjoy!


Mariah Roze (mariahroze) | 1430 comments Mod
I really enjoyed reading this book too! I read it for a book club a couple of months ago and fell in-love with the author's writing.


Lisa (lisarosenbergsachs) | 123 comments I read this book several years ago so I don't remember all the details. Nevertheless, I remember it being beautifully written and very engaging. The movie made from it was beautiful as well.


NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 143 comments Lisa wrote: "I read this book several years ago so I don't remember all the details. Nevertheless, I remember it being beautifully written and very engaging. The movie made from it was beautiful as well."

I missed the movie. I'll have to look for it!


Gisela Hafezparast | 30 comments I have read "the Lowlands" from this author before, which is a fantastic book. I am now about half way through this one and I have to say she is fast becoming one of my favourite authors. He writing is so insightful. This time in regard to the experience of children growing up in their birth country and therefore their home country, but who are and especially their parents, still deeply immersed in another country's culture and habits. Fascinating. My family is multi-ethnic, multi religious, what we used to call "multi-cultural Britain" and whilst neither my husband or I have every insisted on putting our own cultures on our children wanting them to grow up as Brits, it obviously had a significant impact on our lives (good and sometimes not so good). I can therefore recognize and relate to many of Gogol's experience.


Lisa (lisarosenbergsachs) | 123 comments Most of us in the United States should relate since we are a country of immigrants. In my case, it was my grandparents who were the ones who emigrated. So soon many people forget.


Gisela Hafezparast | 30 comments Lisa wrote: "Most of us in the United States should relate since we are a country of immigrants. In my case, it was my grandparents who were the ones who emigrated. So soon many people forget."

Agree, most of all Trump, son of an immigrant himself I believe.


Lisa (lisarosenbergsachs) | 123 comments I think his mother was from Ireland. She may have been undocumented.


NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 143 comments I thought I saw that you were reading Interpreter of Maladies next month, but now I don't see it. Perhaps I saw it somewhere else? Or maybe interest has dropped? (I think it would be hard to read so many books in a row by the same author.)

Anyway, I've read it twice and I loved it. The leader of my library book brought in some interesting scholarly articles about it that I still recall (somewhat). One talked about the importance of selecting balanced stories (which she did) to prevent unfair stereotyping. She created a story cycle that gave us contrasting (but equally likely) pictures of culture, marriage and key values.

Do many of the members of this board teach diversity topics (directly or indirectly)?


NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 143 comments I thought I saw that you were reading Interpreter of Maladies next month, but now I don't see it. Perhaps I saw it somewhere else? Or maybe interest has dropped? (I think it would be hard to read so many books in a row by the same author.)

Anyway, I've read it twice and I loved it. The leader of my library book brought in some interesting scholarly articles about it that I still recall (somewhat). One talked about the importance of selecting balanced stories (which she did) to prevent unfair stereotyping. She created a story cycle that gave us contrasting (but equally likely) pictures of culture, marriage and key values.

Do many of the members of this board teach diversity topics (directly or indirectly)?


Mariah Roze (mariahroze) | 1430 comments Mod
NancyJ wrote: "I thought I saw that you were reading Interpreter of Maladies next month, but now I don't see it. Perhaps I saw it somewhere else? Or maybe interest has dropped? (I think it would be hard to read s..."

Its our last author read next month. Yeah, it is a struggle to get people to participate in Author reads. I might end up stopping them and trying to come up with a different theme for the 4th book.

Those articles sound super interesting! I would have loved to read them and share them.

The members very on here. Some just want more diverse reads and others are people that work with diversity. I'm personally a special ed teacher so I want to read books to help me grow and learn as a teacher.


Megan | 119 comments I'm almost done with this. It took me awhile to warm up to her style, but I really enjoyed the New York interlude about half way thru. She brings up interesting points about culture, identity and family.


Megan | 119 comments I hope you keep the author reads, I've been interested in most of them since joining the group, I just can't always read them in a timely fashion.


Mariah Roze (mariahroze) | 1430 comments Mod
Megan wrote: "I hope you keep the author reads, I've been interested in most of them since joining the group, I just can't always read them in a timely fashion."

I'm glad you like them! Not a ton of people read them so I'm glad you'll read them with me and a couple others :)


back to top