Catching up on Classics (and lots more!) discussion

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich
65 views
New School Classics- 1900-1999 > One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich - NO spoilers

Comments Showing 1-21 of 21 (21 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

Melanti | 2383 comments This thread is for background information and general discussion of our May 2018 New School Group Read selection, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Please DO NOT post spoilers in this thread.


message 2: by Bob, Short Story Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Bob | 5092 comments Mod
Solzhenitsyn’s writing is vividly detailed. I am amazed that so much meticulous description was written in so few pages.


message 3: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - added it

Katy (kathy_h) | 9823 comments Mod
It has been several years since I've read this one. It is short enough, I might just do a reread.


Lalitha (falcon_) | 24 comments I read this a few months ago. I won't be reading it but I would like to see what the others think of the book :)


Pink | 6554 comments I read this only recently and was very impressed. The translation was by H.T. Willetts, apparently it's the only authorised edition and I'd also recommend it. This book reminded me of If This Is a Man by Primo Levi, which was his account of being in Auschwitz. I agree with Bob, that there's a lot packed into such a short story. Very powerful writing.


J_BlueFlower (j_from_denmark) | 1843 comments I also read it recently. If anyone want to read more Solzhenitsyn after this one, I am ready to nominate or second The First Circle or the Cancer Ward.


Lalitha (falcon_) | 24 comments This book reminded me also of Darkness at Noon.


Rosemarie | 1580 comments I read this a month ago and highly recommend it. It gives a detailed description of one day in his life, one of many similar days.


Terris | 2837 comments I accidentally read this last month! But I am really glad that I read it. I was interested to know that the author actually spent eight years in a similar type labor camp, so I guess he knows what he's talking about!


Michele | 1012 comments Terris wrote: "I accidentally read this last month!"

How does one accidentally read a book? ::ponders::


Terris | 2837 comments Michele wrote: "Terris wrote: "I accidentally read this last month!"

How does one accidentally read a book? ::ponders::"


Haha!! Well... I just mean my timing is off on the read. I don't think I can say that I didn't know that it was the May book (because I probably did!), I just forgot. But I went ahead and read it in April. So, see? I read it by accident ;)


J_BlueFlower (j_from_denmark) | 1843 comments Michele wrote: "Terris wrote: "I accidentally read this last month!"

How does one accidentally read a book? ::ponders::"


I have done that. Downloaded it, and just wanted to check it was OK, so I opened it and started reading. And suddenly found I had read the first 10% and then thinking, I may as well just read the rest.


Marina (sonnenbarke) I definitely want to read this (well obviously enough, since I think I either nominated or seconded it...), but it might be during the second half of the month, since I have other books to read sooner. My edition is a very thin one, but it says it's unabridged, so it's probably just printed in a smaller font. I will read it in the Italian translation, and I hope it will prove to be a good one.


Melanti | 2383 comments Marina wrote: "My edition is a very thin one, but it says it's unabridged, so it's probably just printed in a smaller font...."

It's actually a rather short book. <200 pages, and the audio was only 4 1/2 hours.


Marina (sonnenbarke) Melanti wrote: "Marina wrote: "My edition is a very thin one, but it says it's unabridged, so it's probably just printed in a smaller font...."

It's actually a rather short book. <200 pages, and the audio was onl..."


Oh, thanks. My copy has 100 pages, though as I said, I think the font is a small one.


Patrick (patrickofsylvania) | 29 comments For me, the tone seems to match what I imagine the experience would be like. A twitchy fearful feeling that your survival depends on your ability to observe, plan, and contribute.


Jen from Quebec :0) (muppetbaby99) | 216 comments So freaking good, eh? I am almost done the book, but I LOVED the use of PUNCTUATION in the first 2 pages! (NERD, I know). I mean- the man writes SO much info in these long extravagant sentences and the PUNCTUATION makes it flow so well...I think I will actually use this book's first 2 pages next year in the classroom when discussing punctuation in creative writing. Outstanding! --Jen from Quebec :0)


Marina (sonnenbarke) Jennifer Lynn wrote: "So freaking good, eh? I am almost done the book, but I LOVED the use of PUNCTUATION in the first 2 pages! (NERD, I know). I mean- the man writes SO much info in these long extravagant sentences and..."

I didn't notice anything unusual in the punctuation in the first pages - I think it might be linked to the translation. So, did the Italian translator "translate" the unusual punctuation as well? I guess I'll never know.


message 19: by Kathleen (new) - added it

Kathleen | 4182 comments Guess I'm missing out too. My copy has no unusual punctuation either. Relatively short sentences. Nothing special. It's an old copy from the library, translated into English by Max Hayward and Ronald Hingley.

You'll have to tell us what you've got, Jen!


Lotte | 196 comments I'm finally coming round to reading this :) I've been wanting to read this novella ever since I've read Quel beau dimanche!, Jorge Semprún's autobiographical description of a Sunday in the Buchenwald concentration camp, which is heavily influenced by One Day in the Life. I'm curious to learn more about life in Soviet labour camps.


message 21: by Suki (last edited Jun 05, 2018 03:14AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Suki St Charles (goodreadscomsuki_stcharles) | 77 comments I'm starting this one late, but I was really looking forward to it, so I'm just going to go ahead. I really loved Cancer Ward; I thought it was going to be terribly bleak and depressing, but Solzhenitsyn has a gift for drawing you into the personalities of his characters, and there are so many things that are horrible and funny all at the same time. (Just in the first few pages of One Day, he talks about having had a bad night and "kept hoping that morning would never come. But it arrived on time.", or, on the next page, he talks about starting work on a new site, which is currently "a bare field knee-deep in snow, and for a start you'd be digging holes, knocking in fence posts, and stringing barbed wire around them to stop yourself running away."). I love reading him, his use of language.


back to top