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RMFAO 2018 Genre Challenges > May'18: Classics/ Literary Fiction

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message 1: by Cheryl (last edited May 06, 2018 04:14AM) (new)

Cheryl | 2262 comments Mod
Hello everyone,

May is here and so is a month that gives us two options for reading. For this month we have two genre options to choose from as they are quite closely related. Please pick 1 genre and announce in the comments below. Or if you really want to, then feel free to pick both and read 2 genres for this month. It's your choice.

There are absolutely no limits so you can interpret this genre in its broader sense and include other similar genres and/or subgenres that you feel might have a wee bit of similarity with the main genre. You can also include books that are not particularly centered around the main genre but has its components or elements somewhere in the story.

The main intent of this challenge is to incorporate different kinds of books and genres in our normal reading routine to make the experience more fun and entertaining. Please do not lose yourself in the technicalities as we all know how literary genres can be confusing. 
If you have any doubts or questions, then post them below and we'll be happy to answer/discuss them.

Following are the DEFINITIONS for this month's genres:

Classics A classic stands the test of time. The work is usually considered to be a representation of the period in which it was written; and the work merits lasting recognition. In other words, if the book was published in the recent past, the work is not a classic. 
A classic has a certain universal appeal. Great works of literature touch us to our very core beings--partly because they integrate themes that are understood by readers from a wide range of backgrounds and levels of experience. Themes of love, hate, death, life, and faith touch upon some of our most basic emotional responses. As a guideline, the books should be written before the 1960s.

Literary Fiction: Literary fiction is a term that has come into common usage in the early 1960s. The term is principally used to distinguish "serious fiction" which is a work that claims to hold literary merit, in comparison from genre fiction and popular fiction. The name literature is sometimes used for this genre, although it can also refer to a broader category of writing.

Here's a quick summary of the levels:

Level 1: Casual Reader: 1 book (easy)
Level 2: Frequent Reader: 2 books (moderate)
Level 3: Bookworm: 3 books (mildly strenuous)
Level 4: Bibliophile: 4 books (strenuous)
Level 5: Bookiopath: 5 books or more (challenging)

Please mention what type of books you'd be reading:

PB: Paperbacks
EB: E-Books
AB: Audio Books

Please feel free to announce your to-read books along with the level you are targeting for below.

PLEASE READ (for new members):
1. You can read any number of books for the respective genre each month in one particular month. 
2. Take your time and go through your entire TBR-list before deciding the books to read.
3. You can join the challenge at any stage (in any month.)
4. You can drop out of the challenge any time you like.
5. You can select different levels every month.
6. Use this discussion board to share your reads with other members of the group.
7. Please be active and don't hesitate to ask questions or recommend books. 

Happy reading! 


message 2: by Joanne (last edited May 01, 2018 03:57PM) (new)

Joanne Here is my list I would like to add some Australian classics is that ok.


Australian classics

My Brilliant Career. Originally published in 1954

We of the Never-Never published in 1908 also includes the little black princess, published 1907

Others

The Travels. I am really keen to get some of this done. Currently on 30 so hoping to get whatever I can done. The print is smaller and it can be a lot to read , so whatever I can get done will be terrific

Ebook

Howards End published 1910

Audiobooks

Treasure Island. Can’t find the audiobook listing.
Kidnapped


message 3: by Cheryl (last edited Apr 30, 2018 03:07PM) (new)

Cheryl | 2262 comments Mod
Joanne wrote: "Here is my list I would like to add some Australian classics is that ok. ..."

Joanne,

I'm so glad you are listing Austalian classics. I like to read books from countries other than my own (USA), but don't always know what's worth reading. I have read My Brilliant Career, and really enjoyed it. (The film was good, too.) I will have to look for the other two books you mentioned.


message 4: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 2262 comments Mod
I will be reading a number of classics, too. I just got two from my library:

Camille by Alexandre Dumas

Lost Horizon by James Hilton


message 5: by Adelaide (new)

Adelaide Blair | 395 comments I will be reading two classics:

The Doctor's Family by Margaret Oliphant

Indian Summer By William Dean Howells.


message 6: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 2262 comments Mod
Adelaide,

I've read Indian Summer, and really liked it.


message 7: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (madamevauquer) | 3586 comments Mod
Joanne wrote: "Here is my list I would like to add some Australian classics is that ok. "

I've heard of My Brilliant Career. It's supposed to be excellent. You have some goodies on your list.


message 8: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (madamevauquer) | 3586 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "I will be reading a number of classics, too. I just got two from my library:

Camille by Alexandre Dumas

Lost Horizon by James Hilton"


Thanks for setting up the thread, Cheryl!

We read Camille at the French Literature group. It's one of those odd books that starts out in the "present" and then tells the story. They always sort of throw me for a loop, lol. Enjoyed it.

I wasn't as fond of Lost Horizon. I've seen two or three versions of the movie. The book was ok, but I seem to recall that the prose wasn't filled with sumptuous descriptions as I expected. Maybe it was and I was just comparing it to the movie - it's been so long.


message 9: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (madamevauquer) | 3586 comments Mod
Adelaide wrote: "I will be reading two classics:

The Doctor's Family by Margaret Oliphant

Indian Summer By William Dean Howells."


Looks like some good choices, Adelaide. I've read something by both authors, but neither of those particular books.


message 10: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (madamevauquer) | 3586 comments Mod
I pillaged my bookshelves for ancient paperbacks and pulled a dozen off the shelves. The four now on my nightstand hoping to finally be read are:
That Bringas Woman
Out of Africa / Shadows on the Grass
The Sibyl
The Menagerie

A wealth of eBooks and audio books are available for free download thanks to Project Gutenberg and LibriVox. I have about a dozen likely candidates picked out by various authors including A. E. W. Mason, J. S. Fletcher, Louis Joseph Vance, John Buchan, Upton Sinclair and George Gissing, plus a new author to try - Fred M. White (looks like mysteries).


message 11: by Adelaide (new)

Adelaide Blair | 395 comments Cheryl and Dagny

I love Howells and Oliphant so really looking forward to this.


message 12: by Joanne (new)

Joanne Cheryl wrote: "Joanne wrote: "Here is my list I would like to add some Australian classics is that ok. ..."

Joanne,

I'm so glad you are listing Austalian classics. I like to read books from countries other than..."


Thanks Cheryl and Dagny I’m glad you like them. I actually haven’t read my brilliant career but loved the movie. Thought it was about time I read it and the same with Gallipoli.

You might also like a few others Cheryl. Such as

A Town Like Alice. Set in Alice Spriings some of it and the war. White Coolies movie was called paradise road starring Meryl Streep?

Also one I love is

Jackie French Jackie French .


message 13: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 2262 comments Mod
Thanks for the suggestions, Joanne!


message 14: by Cheryl (last edited May 01, 2018 06:15AM) (new)

Cheryl | 2262 comments Mod
I asked Heena (who is recovering from allergies right now) what could be included as a Classic for this challenge. She said classic books from any genre could be used, as long as they were written before the 1960s.

So, you can read mystery classics from authors like Agatha Christie or Raymond Chandler, science fiction classics from authors like Isaac Asimov or Robert Heinlein, or any other genre classics you'd like.


message 15: by Spandana (new)

Spandana Rao (aprilserendipity) | 6 comments I chose to go for level 3. I I'll be reading three classics , one of which is moved from the April challenge to May.

1) To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

2) Emma by Jane Austen

3) Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Happy reading everyone


message 16: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (madamevauquer) | 3586 comments Mod
Joanne wrote: "
A Town Like Alice. Set in Alice Springs some of it and the war. ..."


I saw the mini-series and enjoyed it so much that I sought out the book. Really liked it. The first I read by Nevile Shute.


message 17: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (madamevauquer) | 3586 comments Mod
Spandana wrote: "I chose to go for level 3. I I'll be reading three classics , one of which is moved from the April challenge to May."

Three tried and true books, Spandana! Good luck.


message 18: by Joanne (last edited May 01, 2018 02:14PM) (new)

Joanne Cheryl wrote: "I asked Heena (who is recovering from allergies right now) what could be included as a Classic for this challenge. She said classic books from any genre could be used, as long as they were written ..."

That is a great addition to the genre. 👍👍👍 should I remove Gallipoli as it was published 1981?


message 19: by Joanne (new)

Joanne Dagny wrote: "Joanne wrote: "
A Town Like Alice. Set in Alice Springs some of it and the war. ..."

I saw the mini-series and enjoyed it so much that I sought out the book. Really liked it. The first I read by N..."


I am yet to read the book, I will keep a look out for it eventually.


message 20: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 2262 comments Mod
Joanne wrote: " should I remove Gallipoli as it was published 1981?"

If it is a novelization of the film, I'd remove it. You can use it in November for the Historical challenge, if you'd like.


message 21: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 2262 comments Mod
1.) Lost Horizon by James Hilton (Classic)

3 stars. A bit different from the film in that it's told as a story within a story. Lots of philosophical talk in the middle, with an ending that can open to interpretation.


message 22: by Kathy (new)

Kathy  | 63 comments I plan to do the literary fiction challenge. I have never read Iris Murdoch and want to read two of her books this month: The Unicorn and The Green Knight.


message 23: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 2262 comments Mod
Kathy wrote: "I plan to do the literary fiction challenge. I have never read Iris Murdoch and want to read two of her books this month: The Unicorn and The Green Knight."

Kathy,

I'm glad you picked Literary Fiction. It's a completely undiscovered genre for me, so please feel free to post ratings or reviews of the books you read. I need to learn more about that genre.


message 24: by Joanne (new)

Joanne Cheryl wrote: "Joanne wrote: " should I remove Gallipoli as it was published 1981?"

If it is a novelization of the film, I'd remove it. You can use it in November for the Historical challenge, if you'd like."



Ok thanks good idea
👍👍


message 25: by B. R. Kyle (new)


message 26: by Joanne (new)

Joanne B. R. wrote: "I'll be reading The Last Unicorn and The Handmaid's Tale"

Ohhh handsmaid tale nice choice.👍👍


message 27: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 2262 comments Mod
2.) The Lady of the Camellias by Alexandre Dumas fils (Also known as Camille.)

4 stars. Very good, but a real tear-jerker.


message 28: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (madamevauquer) | 3586 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "2.) The Lady of the Camellias by Alexandre Dumas fils (Also known as Camille.)

4 stars. Very good, but a real tear-jerker."


Glad you enjoyed it, Cheryl. It's definitely a tear-jerker all right.


message 29: by Joanne (new)

Joanne Cheryl wrote: "2.) The Lady of the Camellias by Alexandre Dumas fils (Also known as Camille.)

4 stars. Very good, but a real tear-jerker."


Another one for TBR list


message 30: by Spandana (new)

Spandana Rao (aprilserendipity) | 6 comments Dagny wrote: "Spandana wrote: "I chose to go for level 3. I I'll be reading three classics , one of which is moved from the April challenge to May."

Three tried and true books, Spandana! Good luck."

Thank you Danny !


message 31: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 2262 comments Mod
Joanne,

You can find Camille at Project Gutenberg under its french title here:

https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/1608

The text is in english, but the title is in french, for some reason.


message 32: by Joanne (new)

Joanne Cheryl wrote: "Joanne,

You can find Camille at Project Gutenberg under its french title here:

https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/1608

The text is in english, but the title is in french, for some reason."


Thanks I check it out and download it. 👍👍👍


message 33: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (madamevauquer) | 3586 comments Mod
#1 for May: The Black Bag

Predictable (with a cute twist at the end), fun read.


message 34: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 2262 comments Mod
3.) The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway


message 35: by Joanne (last edited May 04, 2018 03:06PM) (new)

Joanne Finished Treasure Island. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 36: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (madamevauquer) | 3586 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "3.) The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway"

I fear that I am not a great fan of Hemingway's books. Have read three or four and the only one I really liked was The Old Man and the Sea. I have been to the Hemingway House in Key West though and also the bar he frequented.


message 37: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (madamevauquer) | 3586 comments Mod
#2. The Power House

Available at PG and LibriVox. First in the series. Fair, but not really worth seeking out since it's the only one available.


message 38: by Cheryl (last edited May 05, 2018 01:10PM) (new)

Cheryl | 2262 comments Mod
Dagny wrote: "I fear that I am not a great fan of Hemingway's books. Have read three or four and the only one I really liked was The Old Ma..."

Dagny,

Don't feel bad about not liking Hemingway. He's not for everyone, and I really have to be in the right mood to read his books. This one didn't have much plot, but I did feel like I was hanging out with these people as they partied through France and Spain in a desperate attempt to be happy.


message 39: by Shashank (new)

Shashank Gupta (shashank-gupta-102) | 23 comments Does the Hitchhiker's Trilogy count as a classic?
And The Tale of Two Cities?

The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

A Tale of Two Cities


message 40: by Cheryl (last edited May 06, 2018 04:13AM) (new)

Cheryl | 2262 comments Mod
Shashank wrote: "Does the Hitchhiker's Trilogy count as a classic?
And The Tale of Two Cities?]"


Shashank,

A Tale of Two Cities counts, but not The Hitchhiker's Guide. I previously mentioned the books chosen should be written before the 1960s. I do hope you enjoyed The Htchhiker's Guide, though. It's pretty funny.


message 41: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 2262 comments Mod
4.) The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger

3 stars. I read this in my teens, but wanted to see how I felt about it as an adult. I still thought it was good, but it really was more of a character study than a story with a strong plot. It's still worth reading, though.


message 42: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (madamevauquer) | 3586 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "4.) The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger

3 stars. I read this in my teens, but wanted to see how I felt about it as an adult. I still thought it was good, but it really was more of..."


I think I was in my 20s when I read it. As I recall, I preferred his Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters.


message 43: by Shashank (new)

Shashank Gupta (shashank-gupta-102) | 23 comments Cheryl wrote: "Shashank wrote: "Does the Hitchhiker's Trilogy count as a classic?
And The Tale of Two Cities?]"

Shashank,

A Tale of Two Cities counts, but not The Hitchhiker's Guide. I previously mentioned the ..."


Thanks Cheryl.
Yet to read both of them. Planning to finish them this month


Donna (weegraydog) (weegraydog) I was wondering if The Bonesetter's Daughter by Amy Tan would count as literary fiction? That has been on my to-read list for a long time.


message 45: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 2262 comments Mod
Donna wrote: "I was wondering if The Bonesetter's Daughter by Amy Tan would count as literary fiction? That has been on my to-read list for a long time."

Donna,

Yes, I would call that literary fiction.


message 46: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (madamevauquer) | 3586 comments Mod
#3 - another classic
The Metropolis
If you enjoyed The Jungle, don't bother with this one. I'm wondering why I did. It was well over the halfway point before there was really any action. It begins with descriptions of the "society" of the times in New York City - their habits, doings, homes, furnishings, etc. Some parts were interesting in the historical context, but it went on way too long for me. I think I'll skip the one about the stock market and try King Coal next time.


message 47: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 2262 comments Mod
Dagny wrote: "#3 - another classic
The Metropolis
If you enjoyed The Jungle, don't bother with this one. I'm wondering why I did."


That's too bad, Dagny. The Jungle is a great book, but it nearly scarred me emotionally. So bleak and depressing!


message 48: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (madamevauquer) | 3586 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "That's too bad, Dagny. The Jungle is a great book..."

I'm hoping for better results with King Coal when I get around to reading it. I think it might try to expose coal mining as with The Jungle and meat-packing.

(One of the items heavily described in The Metropolis which I forgot to mention was fashion. Blanked it out, I suspect, lol. It might have been quite an enlightening book in its day.)


message 49: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 2262 comments Mod
5.) The Thirteenth Chair by Bayard Veiller

2 stars. A locked room mystery play from 1916. It was made into films in 1919, 1929 and 1937. It was ok, but pretty melodramatic. I actually watched the 1929 film today on TCM. It was melodramatic, too. Bela Lugosi was the police inspector, in one of his pre-Dracula roles.


message 50: by Joanne (new)

Joanne Kidnapped. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ I loved it, such adventure telling.


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