The Rory Gilmore Reading Challenge discussion

One Hundred Years of Solitude
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Book Discussions > One Hundred Years of Solitude

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message 1: by L (new)

L (lauraactually) | 236 comments Mod
The May book for this group will be One Hundred Years of Solitude. Holly will be leading the discussion so look out for her posts below. In the meantime, who will be reading along?


Elba (elbamaria) | 99 comments I am excited to join in. Thanks.


message 3: by Devo (new) - added it

Devo (devokirk) | 3 comments I’m in!


Windy | 44 comments I'm in!


message 5: by Holly (new) - added it

Holly | 233 comments Mod
Hi everyone! I'm ordering my copy today. This is my first time reading this one and I'm excited. Who's reading this for the first time and who's re-reading?


message 6: by Devo (new) - added it

Devo (devokirk) | 3 comments My first time reading it!


Windy | 44 comments First time reading this one. I'm pretty excited.


message 8: by Marianne (new)

Marianne | 9 comments My fist time reading it :-)


Margriet (m4rgriet) | 12 comments I’m in!


message 10: by The Annotated (new)

The Annotated | 25 comments Me!!


message 11: by Kerri (last edited Apr 29, 2018 06:47AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Kerri Adams I read it last year. I look forward to your thoughts on it. I don't want to spoil anything but willi say the book is a journey, that is more about the trip than the destination. Look for repeating family patterns. Enjoy!


message 12: by rocío (new)

rocío (rxcix) | 3 comments I needed to read this book for my Spanish class last year, I didn’t read more than 50 pages because I was really unmotivated. I really want to be a part of this discussion so I will try my best to actually read it this time!


message 13: by Holly (new) - added it

Holly | 233 comments Mod
Rocio wrote: "I needed to read this book for my Spanish class last year, I didn’t read more than 50 pages because I was really unmotivated. I really want to be a part of this discussion so I will try my best to ..."

What made you unmotivated by it? Just that you were "forced" to read it for a class or something else?


message 14: by Stephanie (new) - added it

Stephanie Johnson | 324 comments Mod
Ive never read this one. Im tempted to read it in Spanish, but I think that would take me longer.


message 15: by rocío (new)

rocío (rxcix) | 3 comments Holly wrote: "Rocio wrote: "I needed to read this book for my Spanish class last year, I didn’t read more than 50 pages because I was really unmotivated. I really want to be a part of this discussion so I will t..."

I think that was the issue. I needed to do a lot of stuff at the time so I was expecting like a chill, easy book that I could just read the night before the due date. It wasn’t like that at all, so I ended procrastinating it and hating the book, too. Hopefully now that I can calmly read it I will like it better!


message 16: by Holly (new) - added it

Holly | 233 comments Mod
Rocio wrote: "Holly wrote: "Rocio wrote: "I needed to read this book for my Spanish class last year, I didn’t read more than 50 pages because I was really unmotivated. I really want to be a part of this discussi..."

I can agree! I've had so many books that I've been required to read and hated them, only to read them years later and love them. I can agree that this book is not just a "read it in a night" book.

On a side note: How's everyone doing in their reading? I'm on the 3rd chapter.


Cathy I am keen to read this. So far on the second chapter but having to take it slowly, to get used to the author's style.


Debbie (debblett) I'm in. I've not read it before. Hoping to start it next week.


Jennifer Lindsay  | 29 comments I'm most likely in. I was hoping Love in the Time of Cholera would be my first Gabriel Garcia Marquez as I read it is better to start there. I do have both books, so I will see how I feel as I proceed. I'm always up for a challenge.


message 20: by Holly (new) - added it

Holly | 233 comments Mod
Cathy wrote: "I am keen to read this. So far on the second chapter but having to take it slowly, to get used to the author's style."

It's taken me a while to get use to the style. I'm about 120 pages in an it took me about 50 to get my head wrapped around the style. The comings and going in the town makes me have to double read some parts. I'm constantly going back to the family tree that's in my book going "Wait who's married to who?" "Who is that a son of?"


Kerri Adams At some point you realize its almost oddly comical how names and events get repeated throughout time.


message 22: by Holly (new) - added it

Holly | 233 comments Mod
Checking in!

How's everyone doing? What are your thoughts so far?


message 23: by Elba (new) - rated it 5 stars

Elba (elbamaria) | 99 comments I am liking it so far. I am having a hard time keeping track of names; Seems like the same names keep circling around. I am picking up a biblical theme and the family is very eccentric.


message 24: by Holly (new) - added it

Holly | 233 comments Mod
The one thing I clued in on is remember the family curse...that seems to be almost a mitigating factor in the events that have taken place.

Yes, I'm struggling with keeping track of the names too! I feel like I need a score card, but at the same time, I understand the way he names them. If you consider the time period this was suppose to be written in, early findings of Central America/Mexico, it was very common for family names to be used in multiple variations in children's names. So that while it's hard, didn't overly surprise me. I mean in my family alone James, Matthew, and Adam are used in every generation at least twice!


Kerri Adams Yes! The family curse is key! I kept a running handwritten list and a few words about the character to help me.


message 26: by Holly (new) - added it

Holly | 233 comments Mod
Kerri wrote: "Yes! The family curse is key! I kept a running handwritten list and a few words about the character to help me."

My big thing is who is married to whom, and then Jose goes and has 17 kids and I got all screwed up there for a few pages. Got myself straightened out though.


Margriet (m4rgriet) | 12 comments I also have some trouble with the names. But the story and the way it is told is really good.


message 28: by Holly (new) - added it

Holly | 233 comments Mod
Margriet wrote: "I also have some trouble with the names. But the story and the way it is told is really good."

I agree. The further I get the easier it is to read. I still have to pay attention to the names (especially since I'm at the point where they seem to have started to jump to the next generation), but it's gotten much easier to read.

(view spoiler)


message 29: by Holly (new) - added it

Holly | 233 comments Mod
Sorry have been missing in action this week. It's our last full week of school so things have been kinda crazy here.

How's everyone reading?
I'm a little more than half way and I'm interested how things are winding down. I also feel really bad for Ursula. It almost feels like the world crumbles around her.

Anyone have any other thoughts about the first half of the book?


message 30: by Holly (new) - added it

Holly | 233 comments Mod
Also: While we all know Wikapedia is not always the best source, They did have an awesome generational layout on their website to help keep who's in what generation straight.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_Hun...


Colleen (miniguinea73) | 0 comments Love this book so much. Reminds me of Allendes’s House of the Spirits


message 32: by Elba (new) - rated it 5 stars

Elba (elbamaria) | 99 comments Colleen wrote: "Love this book so much. Reminds me of Allendes’s House of the Spirits"Yes! I like your comment. The writing has such a flow and the story builds and builds with interesting characters. <3


message 33: by Marianne (new)

Marianne | 9 comments This book was rare. There was so much about this book, so many details and so confusing. And yet it all depends. Everything makes sense but you just can`t quite explain how.


message 34: by Holly (new) - added it

Holly | 233 comments Mod
I agree Marianne.
The book comes full circle and you have to remember what happens in the beginning. It's amazing how the author wraps storylines and characters in each other.


message 35: by Holly (new) - added it

Holly | 233 comments Mod
Who's finished?


Jennifer Lindsay  | 29 comments I'm on page 160 and adoring it!


message 37: by Stephanie (new) - added it

Stephanie Johnson | 324 comments Mod
I just finished it. It took me longer to read because I could only find the audio book at my library. I thought that was a bit odd. I really like d the storyline of the parchments and the gypsies and Melquíades. But it connects through all the stories of the Buendia family. It's well written, well thought out and I love it. I don't know what else to say about it.


message 38: by Holly (new) - added it

Holly | 233 comments Mod
Stephanie wrote: "I just finished it. It took me longer to read because I could only find the audio book at my library. I thought that was a bit odd. I really like d the storyline of the parchments and the gypsies a..."

Yes the stories all relate back to Melquidaes. The way he connects the beginning to the end is quite perfect. I enjoyed it too. I won't lie to say that when we picked it I wasn't' quite sure what I was getting into. Seriously "One Hundred Years of Solitude" doesn't lend to an exciting page turning anticipation type of title. I was actually surprised how fast it did read.


message 39: by Stephanie (new) - added it

Stephanie Johnson | 324 comments Mod
Holly wrote: "Stephanie wrote: "I just finished it. It took me longer to read because I could only find the audio book at my library. I thought that was a bit odd. I really like d the storyline of the parchments..."

Exactly! I talked to my DH about the title and it eluded me a bit until that last line in the book. It helped it all to come together for me. I was thinking that it was the solitude of the town and how each character, even though surrounded by people, was alone in their own world and their family history kept repeating in a circle. What I don't get though was why Melquidaes wrote about their family at all.


Margriet (m4rgriet) | 12 comments Just finished the book. Wow, what a story. I am really impressed how the author connects everything and makes the story complete. A sort of full circle. And in the end the title makes much more sense, then when I started reading the book.


Paige | 5 comments Just finished as well. What a journey it's been. I feel so sorry for Ursula. Of all of them, I felt she didn't deserve her fate. I think I might have to reread some parts of the story though. There're so many layers to the story and I'm still processing some of the events.


message 42: by Holly (new) - added it

Holly | 233 comments Mod
I felt the same way about Ursela. Being the matriarch of the family, she was beyond mistreated, especially by Fernanda.

The character I felt was underplayed that I would have loved to have more on was Rebecca.


message 43: by Elba (new) - rated it 5 stars

Elba (elbamaria) | 99 comments I finished One Hundred Years of Solitude. I really enjoyed reading about the eclectic Buendias and the town of Macondo. It is a masterpiece of writing and Márquez genius shines through in epic proportion. Each generation is destined to repeat the same downturn. The ones that leave Macondo thrive and prosper and upon their return they succumb to the family’s fate.


Irene | 4 comments Hi all! I read A Hundred Years of Solitude many years ago and I want to read it again any time soon, though I don't think it will be this month.

I remember it took me a while to get into the story but in the end I thought it was very well rounded and beautifully written. As it is somewhat a circular story, everything makes sense in the end and by then I wanted to read it again to try and notice of all the small details I had missed before because I didn't really know where the story was heading.

I also remember it was tricky to keep track of all the names that kept repeating themselves throughout the story. I think I read somewhere that there was a reason for that, besides it being a family custom to repeat names in the family. So, for example, all the Aurelianos in the story had certain character traits and the Melquiades nearly the opposite personality (I hope I'm not mixing up the names, it is quite long since I read it).

Also, the story being circular and the events it describes, that's supposed to somewhat represent the history of certain South American peoples and countries, in a very free and allegorical way. So there's actually a lot more to A Hundred Years of Solitude than what meets the eye. I'm very looking forward to reading it again and meanwhile to discuss it here with you.


message 45: by Holly (new) - added it

Holly | 233 comments Mod
Elba, I agree. It's fascinating how even the massive amount of children the one son has and how they spread out so much, they still succumb to the same fate.

Irene, I didnt know that about Southern American/Central American culture. Interesting!


Colleen (miniguinea73) | 0 comments About halfway through now. Still loving it but getting lost in the names!


message 47: by Cathrine (last edited May 31, 2018 11:36AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Cathrine | 14 comments Colleen wrote: "About halfway through now. Still loving it but getting lost in the names!"

I'm so glad I'm not the only one who hasn't finished yet! I'm only 100 pages into it because I was too busy with my exams up until today...

I also find the names to be quite confusing, but I think I'm getting the hang of it. Also, my edition has a family tree at the beginning of the book which is really helpful!


Irene | 4 comments I'm also halfway now - I actually started reading after I posted on this thread last week. So many interesting comments made me want to read it again straight away :)

I am reading the Spanish original I have been surprised by how many times the word 'solitude' pops up, totally giving meaning to the title of this novel. Perhaps in English this has been translated as loneliness, as well as solitude so it doesn't seem so obvious.

Irene wrote: I also remember it was tricky to keep track of all the names that kept repeating themselves throughout the story. I think I read somewhere that there was a reason for that, besides it being a family custom to repeat names in the family. So, for example, all the Aurelianos in the story had certain character traits and the Melquiades nearly the opposite personality (I hope I'm not mixing up the names, it is quite long since I read it).

Actually the names that repeat over time are Aureliano and José Arcadio and I found this notes in my old textbook for Spanish Lieterature: "The characters of the Buendía family follow after one another with similar names, contributing to the loss of individuality and to identify common traits. Men are named José Arcadio and Aureliano and the family lines continues only through the first ones, as the offsrping of the second is always cut short. [...] Each name implies some typical character traits: the Aurelianos are shy; the José Arcadios impulsive. Among women, the most repeated names are Úrsula, Remedios and Amaranta."

The translation is mine, so sorry for any grammar mistake. I thought this would be interesting to share. I hope you find it helpful!


Jennifer Lindsay  | 29 comments I just finished. I really love it! "The world must be all f*cked up, when men travel first class and literature goes as freight." The poetry throughout the book is haunting, touching, ridiculous; it was such a beautiful work to be living in for a time. I know I will continue to process it for a long time and will look back on it with fondness and love.


Colleen (miniguinea73) | 0 comments I feel like this book is my Anna Karenina of spring. Still trudging through, stealing chapters here and there. I'm also re-reading Joy Luck Club at the same time and avoiding Catcher in the Rye and Tender is the Night. My nightstand is full of books I'm meant to be reading! LOL


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