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The Cove
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Group Reads: Post-1990 > Final Impressions: The Cove: May 2018

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message 1: by Tom, "Big Daddy" (new) - added it

Tom Mathews | 2747 comments Mod
Comments on this board are made with the assumption that readers have finished the book and may include spoilers.


message 2: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new) - rated it 4 stars

Diane Barnes | 4402 comments Mod
Here is a review by Diane: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


LA Cantrell | 1324 comments Were you totally surprised when the speech impediment/mutism turned out to be something entirely different? I remember not having any clue until RR intentionally dropped little inserts for us to find.

He said in that interview that this was his parallel to Orpheus. Did you see that?


message 4: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new) - rated it 4 stars

Diane Barnes | 4402 comments Mod
The first inkling I had was when it turned out the prison was actually a German Internment Camp. I'm not sure I could hide my ability to speak as well as he did. Not a knowledgeable student of mythology, so can't comment on Orpheus.


message 5: by LA Cantrell (last edited May 02, 2018 06:40AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

LA Cantrell | 1324 comments Diane wrote: "The first inkling I had was when it turned out the prison was actually a German Internment Camp. I'm not sure I could hide my ability to speak as well as he did. Not a knowledgeable student of myth..."

I had to look it up, having never studied mythology at all. Orpheus was creation's best musician and his lover was Eurodice (sp?). She ended up in Hades (kind of like how dark the cove was) dead. He struck some sort of deal and went to Hades himself, still alive, but playing his music that charmed the powers that be.

They allowed him to take Eurodice back to the living world with him, but said despite the long journey, he could not look back at her. Of course, just shy of making it back, he worried she was not behind him and glanced back. That glance gave him a glimpse of her and all she could utter was goodbye. He traveled back into life but was heartbroken that she was dead - all he had was his music.

I may be entirely mangling this thing - mythology fans, please forgive me. But it pleases me that RR used the myth of Medea for Serena, too. I'd love to know if other of his novels also paralleled Greek tragedies or myths!


message 6: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new) - rated it 4 stars

Diane Barnes | 4402 comments Mod
Thanks, LeAnne, that was helpful. I tend to read books without much research into the background, but it's always nice to know after the fact, when I can put it all together.


message 7: by Beverly (last edited May 09, 2018 01:50PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Beverly | 192 comments I enjoyed reading this. The only time I became a little bored was when reading about the digging of the new well. However, when I went back to re-read the Prologue, I saw how important that part of the story was.

I know very little about mythology so thank you, LeAnne for that information about Orpheus.


message 8: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new) - rated it 4 stars

Diane Barnes | 4402 comments Mod
I thought the digging of that well was pretty suspenseful. What a horrible way to accomplish that feat. Labor intensive and scary. Thank goodness for modern machinery.


Beverly | 192 comments You are right Diane. I know I certainly would not want to be under ground like that. Looking back at the story, I guess I did not start worrying about Walter until his last trip down.


LA Cantrell | 1324 comments He was certainly tunneling down into the underworld - orpheus indeed!


Connie G (connie_g) | 504 comments I was very worried about Walter during the digging of the well because of the skull found in the prologue. But I had a feeling that the author was using that to create suspense, and there was someone else in the well.

Thanks for the mythology, LeAnne.


message 12: by ALLEN (new)

ALLEN | 138 comments Here's a last-minute alert for anyone following this: In ten minues the "Movies!" network (cable, brodcast in some large cities) will air Audrey Hepburn's most successful movie based on Truman Capote's most successful novella-length story: Breakfast at Tiffany's.

Lest I introduce spoilers, I will say that the time of the movie was relocated from mid-World War II as in the novella to comtemporary (1961) New York -- but the George Peppard character was an invention for reasons I can't go into here.

Movies! comes into our (Chicago) home on b'cast 50.2. It airs at 2:00 p.m. CDT, 3:00 p.m. EDT, etc. Following that: the delectable movie FUNNY FACE (Paramount, 1957).

Happy Mother's Day -- or Audrey's Day, depending.
13 May 2018


message 13: by Cathrine ☯️ (last edited May 14, 2018 07:11AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Cathrine ☯️  | 750 comments Finished and sticking with my original 4 star rating.
This is the only book in probably 40 years that I have reread. It's only been several years and I remembered nothing.--not who was in the well or that Laurel and her brother were murdered. I vividly remember Serena. On the other hand I assumed Walter was the escaped German prisoner and not talking to hide his accent.
Because of all the Appalachian fiction I've read since the first time around, it was more obvious to me how he juxtaposed the dwindling/disappearing parakeets with the end times of the family and way of life in the those mountains. I just watched the Netflix series OZARK and the flooding of family land features prominently with bad feelings, violence, and restitution.


message 14: by Judi (new) - rated it 4 stars

Judi | 465 comments Finished. Four stars. A little heavy handed for me. One could sense the doom from the start. The character, Chauncey, was marked as evil from the start. I preferred One Foot In Eden.


message 15: by Steve (new)

Steve Craig | 12 comments good pick. enjoy the WWI timing. after The Cove then read the action packed Serena immediately thereafter.


Connie G (connie_g) | 504 comments I enjoyed the book, although I agree with some of the other comments that Chauncey was a bit of a stereotype for evil. I read the first edition before Rash made some changes. This is my review:
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


LA Cantrell | 1324 comments I love that he revises his books!


Connie G (connie_g) | 504 comments Authors have publishing deadlines so sometimes rush the end of the books. Ron Rash chooses his words so carefully and beautifully when he's writing. I can imagine him thinking about how he could make the book better.


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