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Books > The Book Salon ~~ April 2018

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message 1: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19520 comments


This the thread for general book discussions for April.

Tell us what you just read, are currently reading or plan to read. Tell us about your favorite author. Have you read some book news? Share it with the group. Anything related to books and reading, we want to hear all about it !
:)


message 2: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 2938 comments The 9th Girl The 9th Girl (Kovac and Liska, #4) by Tami Hoag by Tami Hoag

In this 4th book in the series Detectives Kovak and Liska are chasing a sadistic serial killer. The investigation gets more complicated because Liska's son knew the latest victim, a teenage girl called Gray. Okay mystery. 3 stars

My complete review:
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 3: by Petra (new)

Petra | 1072 comments I've just started Children of God by Mary Doria Russell. This is a sequel to The Sparrow, which I loved.

On audio in the car I'm listening to East of Eden by John Steinbeck and loving it.

On my runs I'm listening to The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins. To tell the truth, I didn't expect much from this book but I'm loving it. It's perfectly twisted and unreliable.


message 5: by madrano (new)

madrano | 12335 comments Barbara, i like when you & others state that the book under consideration is "okay". The lack of hyperbole is welcome.

Some good books being read. My hardback, paper book is Andrew Johnson: A Biography by Hans L. Trefousse. When it's dark, i am reading, from my iPad, How to Stop Time by Matt Haig.


message 6: by Rt (new)

Rt (rtrt) | 1 comments Hello! I am currently reading The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl by Timothy Egan and The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen. I haven't been able to put down The Worst Hard Time since I began reading it.


message 7: by Alias Reader (last edited Apr 01, 2018 08:30PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19520 comments Rt wrote: "Hello! I am currently reading The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl by Timothy Egan and [book:The Sympathizer|23168277..."

We read The Worst Hard Time here at Book Nook Cafe in 2009.
It's in our Group Read thread. Here's a link.
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

Welcome to Book Nook Cafe, RT. We look forward to getting to know you and chatting about books and things.


message 8: by madrano (new)

madrano | 12335 comments Rt, my aunt has been raving about The Sympathizer for some time now. I keep intending to pick it up but haven't yet. Enjoy!


message 9: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 2938 comments The Harder They Come The Harder They Come by T.C. Boyle by T.C. Boyle

This is essentially a character study of 3 main protagonists; Adam Stensen, a mentally ill young man who yearns to emulate the life of 'mountain man' John Colter (from the Lewis and Clark expedition); Sten Stensen - Adam's father, a former Marine and school principal who doesn't know how to deal with his son; and Sara Jennings - an extreme 'libertarian' who doesn't think laws apply to her. The plot addresses violence, drugs, troubled people, etc. Good book. 4 stars

My complete review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 10: by Alias Reader (last edited Apr 02, 2018 12:51PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19520 comments Barbara wrote: "The Harder They Come The Harder They Come by T.C. Boyle by T.C. Boyle

This is essentially a character study of 3 main protagonists; Adam Stensen, a mentally..."


Book Nook Cafe read this book April 2017.
I thought it was quite good.

https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...


Since you liked this one I can also recommend his other book
The Tortilla Curtain
It's a great discussion book.


message 11: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19520 comments Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise



----- That's What She Said: What Men Need to Know and Women Need to Tell Them About Working...
by Joanne Lipman

What it is: an insightful examination of gender bias in the workplace, providing anecdotes of how companies have addressed and alleviated the gender gap.

About the author: Joanne Lipman, the editor-in-chief at USA Today and a former reporter for the Wall Street Journal, expounds on her professional experiences to push this timely conversation forward.

For fans of: Lean In, Sheryl Sandberg's practical call to gender equality in the workplace.



----- With the End in Mind: Dying, Death & Wisdom in an Age of Denial
by Kathryn Mannix

What it is: a compassionate journey through the process of dying.

What sets it apart: Kathryn Mannix reflects on her 30-year practice as a palliative care physician, richly detailing her patients' experiences.

Supplemental materials: a letter-writing template for saying goodbye to loved ones.



----- Burn the Business Plan: What Great Entrepreneurs Really Do
by Carl J. Schramm

What it is: a candid guide for budding entrepreneurs that debunks common business myths and makes the case for forging one's own path to success.

Did you know? The average entrepreneur is 39 and has worked in corporate America for at least ten years.

Chapters include: encouraging reminders, case histories, and a survey to determine if franchising your business is the right choice for you.



------ Mommy Burnout: How to Reclaim Your Life and Raise Healthier Children in the Process
by Sheryl Ziegler

What it is: a reassuring guide to help mitigate mental and physical exhaustion in mothers (though it's primarily aimed at heterosexual middle-class women).

About the author: Child psychologist and mother of three Sheryl Ziegler draws upon her professional and personal experiences to provide a variety of perspectives for both stay-at-home and working moms.

Chapters include: Case studies from Ziegler's practice and detailed strategies to effectively combat mommy burnout.



******** Focus on: Autism



---------- The Autistic Brain: Helping Different Kinds of Minds Succeed
by Temple Grandin and Richard Panek

What it's about: Celebrated animal science professor Temple Grandin discusses how technological advancements in neuroscience have contributed to the study of autism.

Why you might like it: Grandin's clear writing style and optimistic outlook make the technical subject matter understandable even if you don't have a scientific background.



---------The Autism Revolution: Whole-Body Strategies for Making Life All It Can Be
by Martha Herbert and Karen Weintraub

What it is: an in-depth and unorthodox examination of the diagnosis and treatments of autism.

Is it for you? Renowned neurologist Martha Herbert rejects the view that autism is solely a genetically determined disorder, emphasizing the impact of environmental factors, diet, and stress on the brain.

Reviewers say: The Autism Revolution is "an important book with broader implications than its specific subject" (Kirkus Reviews).



-------- Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8: A Young Man's Voice from the Silence of Autism
by Naoki Higashida

What it's about: In this captivating memoir, Naoki Higashida, a man with nonverbal autism, expressively conveys the frustration of relying on a keyboard to communicate with others.

Who it's for: Readers who enjoy artful and eloquent writing.

Book buzz: Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8 is a follow-up to the international phenomenon The Reason I Jump: The Inner Voice of a Thirteen-Year-Old Boy with Autism, which Higashida wrote as a teenager.



--------- Autism Adulthood: Strategies and Insights for a Fulfilling Life
by Susan Senator

What it is: a straightforward guide that addresses the challenges of parenting adult children with autism.

What sets it apart: While there are plenty of resources on caring for young children with autism, books on caring for adult children with autism are more difficult to find.

You might also like: Teresa Sullivan's matter-of-fact memoir Mikey and Me, which candidly chronicles her relationship with her autistic sister.



------ Neurotribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity
by Steve Silberman

What it's about: Award-winning journalist Steve Silberman explores the science, history, and politics of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in this thoroughly researched and authoritative guide.

Who it's for: Silberman's engaging, narrative writing style is suitable for science enthusiasts and general readers alike.

Did you know? Child psychiatrist Leo Kanner coined the term "autism" in 1943.


message 12: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19520 comments



----The Templar legacy : a novel
by Steve Berry

Cotton Malone, a former covert U.S. Justice Department operative, and his ex-supervisor Stephanie Nelle, follow a labyrinthine trail of danger, treachery, high-level intrigue, and overwhelming ambition across Europe on a quest that leads them to the enigmatic secrets of the Knights Templar.



-------Next year in Havana
by Chanel Cleeton

A freelance writer returns to her grandmother’s homeland to fulfill her last wish to have her ashes scattered in Havana and discovers her family history amidst Cuba’s tropical beauty and dangerous political environment.



-----Home
by Harlan Coben

When one of two boys kidnapped from their wealthy families resurfaces a decade later, the young survivor is observed by two peers who would discover the fate of the other missing boy.



------The deep
by Nick Cutter

When a seemingly miraculous healing agent is discovered in the Pacific in the wake of a devastating plague, a team of brave heroes descends through pitch-black waters to an incommunicado research lab in the ocean deep.



-------The Cuban affair
by Nelson DeMille

When his shaky finances compel him to accept a lucrative job for a 10-day fishing tournament to Cuba, Army combat veteran-turned-charter boat captain Mac learns that one of his clients is seeking to claim millions hidden by her grandfather, who was forced to flee Castro's revolution years earlier.



--------Except the Dying
by Maureen Jennings

When the body of a young pregnant girl is found naked in a deserted lane in the middle of winter of 1895, and Toronto Detective William Murdoch must find out why she had to die that way in order to prevent another similar murder.



------Mary's monster : love, madness, and how Mary Shelley created Frankenstein
by Lita Judge

The award-winning creator of Born in the Wild presents a young-adult portrait of Frankenstein's teenaged author, Mary Shelly, in a starkly compelling biography told through free verse and more than 300 full-bleed illustrations.



----- That's not English : Britishisms, Americanisms, and what our English says about us
by Erin Moore

An American expatriate living in London explores the historical and cultural differences between American and British versions of English, covering snacking habits, overall collective personalities, dating and sex, drinking and raising kids.



------- Say nothing : a novel
by Brad Parks

When their children are abducted by a man who blackmails them to follow instructions at the risk of the children's lives, a judge and his wife endure a terrorizing ordeal of no-holds-barred deceit and bond-breaking suspicions.



---------The dire king : a Jackaby novel
by William Ritter

In this conclusion to the Jackaby series, the eccentric detective and his assistant Abigail Rook find themselves in the middle of a war between magical worlds



--------Marcelo in the real world
by Francisco X. Stork

Marcelo Sandoval, a seventeen-year-old boy on the high-functioning end of the autistic spectrum, faces new challenges, including romance and injustice, when he goes to work for his father in the mailroom of a corporate law firm



-----More than you know : a novel
by Beth Richardson Gutcheon

In a novel that explores marriage, divorce, and family ties, Hannah Gray shares her personal story of passion and loss, introducing the ghost who haunted her and the boy she once had loved.



-------Dead wake : the last crossing of the Lusitania
by Erik Larson

The #1 New York Times best-selling author of In the Garden of Beasts presents a 100th-anniversary chronicle of the sinking of the Lusitania that discusses the factors that led to the tragedy and the contributions of such figures as President Wilson, bookseller Charles Lauriat and architect Theodate Pope Riddle.


message 13: by Petra (new)

Petra | 1072 comments I really enjoyed Marcelo in the Real World.

All of Erik Larson's books sound good but I've found (after reading 2 of his books) that they aren't for me. I'm not fond of his writing style. Weird, I know, but true. LOL!


message 14: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 2938 comments Alias Reader wrote:

"Since you liked this one I can also recommend his other book
The Tortilla Curtain
It's a great discussion book. .."


Thank you Alias. I'll check if my library has it. 🙂


message 15: by madrano (new)

madrano | 12335 comments Barbara, i've only read the book Alias mentioned from TCB. I like his style. In this one, the idea of using Colter is neat because readers can be introduced to him, too.

Petra, i understand what you mean about Larson's books. I read & like them but there have been other nonfiction authors whose works as good but something i've yet to put my finger on bothers me. I end up not reading them, when i can. Oddly David Grann is such a writer. The reason it seems odd to me is because two of the books i've read by him (The Lost City of Z and Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI) made my Ten Best Books of the years i read them. Still, there is something...

Alias, thanks for taking the time to share the titles & latest.


message 16: by Alias Reader (last edited Apr 03, 2018 03:07PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19520 comments Book Buddy Read !

Join us for a Buddy Read of
Educated: A Memoir--Tara Westover

We will read the book at our own pace starting probably by this weekend or next week. The book discussion threads are never deleted. So anytime you can join in is fine.

The thread is up is the Buddy Read Folder for us to discuss it.


message 17: by Craig (new)

Craig Monson | 72 comments My belated introduction to Alice Hoffman: The Museum of Extraordinary Things by Alice Hoffman The Museum of Extraordinary Things

My take: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 19: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 2938 comments When All the Girls Have Gone When All the Girls Have Gone (Cutler, Sutter & Salinas #1) by Jayne Ann Krentz by Jayne Ann Krentz

Charlotte Sawyer, who's the activities director at a retirement community, is reeling from (almost) being left at the altar by her former fiance. So when an acquaintance dies mysteriously, and Charlotte meets an appealing private investigator on the case, it's all good. :)
Fans of romantic suspense would probably like this story. 3 stars

My complete review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 20: by madrano (new)

madrano | 12335 comments Craig, i've only heard of Hoffman's name, am i right in remembering that her books are part of the "magical realism" genre? It rather sounds like it from your review and i realize you may not know since this is your first, but i'm curious.

Dem, sharing the graphic sex and animal cruelty notes is something for which i am grateful. Sometimes one can be jarred by content.

Barbara, i rather like the premise of the book you reviewed (without the romance would be preferable for me). Reading your comments & the GR blurb, i cannot figure out why the series is called "(Cutler, Sutter & Salinas #1)". Cutler is obvious but the other two names aren't mentioned in your review or GR. Do you know why?


message 21: by Barbara (last edited Apr 05, 2018 11:23AM) (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 2938 comments madrano wrote: "Barbara, i rather like the premise of the book you reviewed (without the romance would be preferable for me). Reading your comments & the GR blurb, i cannot figure out why the series is called "(Cutler, Sutter & Salinas #1)". Cutler is obvious but the other two names aren't mentioned in your review or GR. Do you know why?


Madrano, Sutter is Max's foster father and Salinas is his foster brother. They're minor characters in this book, but apparently show up as the main characters in subsequent books. As I understand it, that's common in romantic suspense series.


message 22: by Dru83 (new)

Dru83 | 222 comments Murder Games Murder Games by James Patterson by James Patterson I decided to read this because I had started watching the TV series Instinct which is based on this book. Indeed, the book has now been republished titled Instinct. This is a fast paced hunt to catch a serial killer. When a killer sends a book on abnormal behavior to a reporter, Detective Needham tracks down the author, Dylan Reinhardt by barging into the college class he teaches. The killer leaves behind playing cards as clues to who he will kill next. I enjoyed this one a lot primarily because of the relationship between the two main characters.


message 23: by Craig (new)

Craig Monson | 72 comments madrano wrote: "Craig, i've only heard of Hoffman's name, am i right in remembering that her books are part of the "magical realism" genre? It rather sounds like it from your review and i realize you may not know ..."

Madrano, I think you're right (though I hadn't run across the term). It rings true for this book and another of hers I've just about finished: characters seem to buy into the notion that forces are at work in their lives, but in comparatively quiet ways. Much less intrusive than in the lives of (NON-fictional) nuns I once wrote about, who conjured up the devil to help them find a lost violin.


message 24: by Rachelle (new)

Rachelle | 17 comments Dem wrote: "Just finished The Immortalists The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin

My review: www.goodreads.com/review/show/2337105168"


Dem, excellent and thorough review of The Immortalists. It is on my to-read list too. I need to find it at the library.


message 25: by madrano (new)

madrano | 12335 comments Barbara, thanks for clearing that up. I don't read the genre, so never would have realized this is a "thing" they do. Curious, eh?

Craig wrote: "Much less intrusive than in the lives of (NON-fictional) nuns I once wrote about, who conjured up the devil to help them find a lost violin. ..."

LOL--what??? I suppose if it found the violin one can't argue with success...


message 26: by Dem (new)

Dem | 404 comments Rachelle wrote: "Dem wrote: "Just finished The Immortalists The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin

My review: www.goodreads.com/review/show/2337105168"

Dem, excellent and thorough review of The Imm..."


Thank you Rachelle.


message 27: by Craig (new)

Craig Monson | 72 comments Craig wrote: "Much less intrusive than in the lives of (NON-fictional) nuns I once wrote about, who conjured up the devil to help them find a lost violin..."

Madrano wrote: LOL--what??? I suppose if it found the violin one can't argue with success...


The devil revealed that one nun had smashed it and burned the bits!


message 28: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 2938 comments madrano wrote: "Barbara, thanks for clearing that up. I don't read the genre, so never would have realized this is a "thing" they do. Curious, eh?
..."


Madrano, you're welcome. I picked up that tidbit about romance series from reading reviews. LOL


message 29: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 2938 comments All Good Deeds All Good Deeds (Lucy Kendall, #1) by Stacy Green by Stacy Green

This is the first book in the "Lucy Kendall' P.I. series.
Lucy was a social worker who gave it up in disgust because too many child molesters got away with their crimes. Now Lucy's a private detective/vigilante who murders child abusers who evade justice.
In this book, Lucy is bent on finding a 9-year-old who disappeared from her Philadelphia neighborhood. The premise of this story is too over the top for me. 2.5 stars

My complete review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 30: by madrano (new)

madrano | 12335 comments Craig, that sounds like a remarkable story! How do you find such things????

Barbara, the premise of the Kendall series sounds so good. What social workers see would astound many of us. Also, i wouldn't be a bit surprised if one took up the hobby/career path Kendall pursued. I am going to try to find this one, although i'm not fond of all the murder. In a way this sounds akin to the Jeff Lindsay series about Miami forensic worker Dexter, in such books as Darkly Dreaming Dexter. I stopped reading the series after one or two but wasn't surprised to see it as an HBO series. ANYway, thanks for the title & warnings.


message 31: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 2938 comments madrano wrote: "Craig, that sounds like a remarkable story! How do you find such things????

Barbara, the premise of the Kendall series sounds so good. What social workers see would astound many of us. Also, i wou..."


You're welcome Madrano, it's true the heroine has a resemblance to Dexter....and her 'hobby' is understandable. The book made me think of the movie 'Star Chamber', in which a group of judges get frustrated with criminals going free and hatch a similar scheme.


message 32: by Craig (last edited Apr 08, 2018 06:59AM) (new)

Craig Monson | 72 comments madrano wrote: "Craig, that sounds like a remarkable story! How do you find such things????

Years--decades of haunting the Vatican Secret Archive and other Italian archives, always keeping my eyes skinned for things that might prove interesting, beyond my most immediate archival concerns.


message 33: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19520 comments Barbara wrote: The book made me think of the movie 'Star Chamber', in which a group of judges get frustrated with criminals going free and hatch a similar scheme. "

That was a good movie ! Michael Douglas was in it as I recall.


message 34: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 2938 comments Alias Reader wrote: "Barbara wrote: The book made me think of the movie 'Star Chamber', in which a group of judges get frustrated with criminals going free and hatch a similar scheme. "

That was a good movie ! Michael Douglas was in it as I recall. .."


Yes he was. I liked the movie also. 😊


message 35: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 2938 comments Death of a Policeman Death of a Policeman (Hamish Macbeth, #29) by M.C. Beaton by M.C. Beaton

In this 29th book in the series Sergeant Hamish Macbeth investigates the murder of a police officer who was spying on him....as well as other crimes. This series is always funny and entertaining. 3 stars

My complete review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 36: by madrano (new)

madrano | 12335 comments Craig, i think you found a good one. What a pleasure it must be to do such research. I've long liked such rambles but lately haven't made the time for them. I'm glad you shared this one, though.

Barbara, "Star Chamber" is one i recall for it's approach to crime. There was an arrogance to it that the social worker idea (or even Dexter, in a way) doesn't seem to have. It's probably all in the portrayal, eh?


message 37: by Craig (new)

Craig Monson | 72 comments I tried another Alice Hoffman, The Marriage of Opposites by Alice Hoffman The Marriage of Opposites

I think I liked it better (especially for the local color, both on St Thomas and in Paris) than my review might suggest.
*** my review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 38: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 2938 comments Craig wrote: "I tried another Alice Hoffman, The Marriage of Opposites by Alice HoffmanThe Marriage of Opposites

I think I liked it better (especially for the local color, both on St Thomas ..."


There should be more books about historical women artists. :)


message 39: by Jennifer (last edited Apr 09, 2018 02:04PM) (new)

Jennifer (jhaltenburger) | 267 comments Quote from one of the books I'm reading this month: Chuck Amuck The Life and Time of an Animated Cartoonist by Chuck Jones Chuck Amuck: The Life and Time of an Animated Cartoonist:

"Mark Twain said that if you carried a cat home by the tail you would get information that would be valuable to you all your life."

Let me just say

Blahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha
(deep breath)
Blahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha


message 40: by Isabella (new)

Isabella (angelvault) | 1 comments Hello– I don't know where else to post this, but does anyone have any recommendations for books from the dark academia subgenre?


message 41: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 2938 comments Curious Minds Curious Minds (Knight and Moon, #1) by Janet Evanovich by Janet Evanovich and Phoef Sutton

This is the first book in a new comic mystery series about Emerson Knight and Riley Moon - a kooky billionaire and a Harvard educated junior analyst - who solve crimes together. It's an amusing book, though not as hysterical as Evanovich's 'Stephanie Plum' series. 3 stars

My complete review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 42: by Julie (new)

Julie (julielill) | 2455 comments Jennifer wrote: "Quote from one of the books I'm reading this month: Chuck Amuck The Life and Time of an Animated Cartoonist by Chuck Jones [book:Chuck Amuck: The Life and Time of an Animated Cartoonist|338619..."

Adding this book to my reading list. Love the Twain quote!


message 43: by Julie (new)

Julie (julielill) | 2455 comments Isabella wrote: "Hello– I don't know where else to post this, but does anyone have any recommendations for books from the dark academia subgenre?"

I know there are a lot of genres out there but I don't think I have everheard of the dark academia subgenre!


message 44: by madrano (new)

madrano | 12335 comments Isabella, i'm trying to figure out what dark academia subgenre. Noir mysteries set in academic settings? Noir which never happened but is covered in an academic/symposium setting? I guess i need an example. Offhand, my mind turned to noir mysteries such as Dashiell Hammett or Patricia Highsmith. Would Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn be considered one?

Barbara, you liked the latest Evanovich better than i did. While i was alright without the humor her writing exhibits, i just didn't find the story very interesting.

Craig, you put the finger on the pulse of why i find historical fiction disappointing. Craig wrote: "I tend to be a bit uneasy around fictional, “free-thinking” daughters (and sons, for that matter) who are supposed to have grown up before the most recent generations and before the various waves of feminism: they sometimes act as if they have just put down this month’s copy of O, The Oprah Magazine." If there were as many "free-thinking" women around as we see in historical fiction, i suspect changes to how women were viewed would have changed earlier. Of course i'm a dreamer, but in a nonfiction bio i could check the sources, at least.

Regardless, it was a nice review. I liked your posted comment that you liked the book better than the review might indicate. This has happened to me in the past. What i write up doesn't sound as good as what i experienced. Odd, that.


message 45: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19520 comments I don't know that I'll be able to participate, but I thought I would share that NYC is voting for their one book 5 boroughs book.

The Mayor's Office of Media and Entertainment, New York Magazine and Vulture have launched One Book, One New York - where New Yorkers get to pick the ONE BOOK they all want to read together.



If Beale Street Could Talk-James Baldwin

Behold the Dreamers-Imbolo Mbue

When I Was Puerto Rican-Esmeralda Santiago

White Tears-Hari Kunzru

Manhattan Beach-Jennifer Egan


message 46: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 2938 comments Alias Reader wrote: "I don't know that I'll be able to participate, but I thought I would share that NYC is voting for their one book 5 boroughs book.

The Mayor's Office of Media and Entertainment, New York Magazine ..."


This is a great idea!


message 48: by Craig (new)

Craig Monson | 72 comments Dem wrote: "Finished and loved East West Street: On the Origins of "Genocide" and "Crimes Against Humanity"[bookcover:East West Street: On the Origins of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity|30..."
Sounds like a possible "must read," Dem (even though the title is probably the work of the PR department, presumably, and not the author, since, of course, the origins of genocide and crimes against humanity go back much further).


message 49: by madrano (new)

madrano | 12335 comments I agree, Barb, that is a great idea. It'll be interesting to see which wins, as they seem to call to specific neighborhoods. Please keep us informed, Alias. Drawn as i am to Baldwin's writing, Kunzru's book sounds great. I'd probably vote for one of these, although i wouldn't rule out Santiago's. LOL--clearly a challenge for voters!

Dem, thanks for the new-to-me title. It sounds very good.


message 50: by Craig (new)

Craig Monson | 72 comments Another visit to the dark world of Harry Hole: The Thirst (Harry Hole, #11) by Jo Nesbø The Thirst

My take: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


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