New Voices in Fiction Authors from William Morrow discussion

36 views
Inspiration

Comments Showing 1-20 of 20 (20 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by William Morrow (new)

William Morrow | 8 comments Mod
What inspired you to write your book?


message 2: by Mary (new)

Mary McNear (marymcnear) | 22 comments Mod
One night I watched a news show about a young widow who had lost her husband in Afghanistan. With her was her five year old son. I wondered how they would rebuild their lives and it inspired me to explore the ways in which we move forward in the face of unimaginable loss. I don't know what happened to the real life woman and her son but I hope that they, like their fictional counterparts, were able to find some measure of healing and even, eventually, happiness.


message 3: by Emmi (new)

Emmi Itäranta | 19 comments Mod
Memory of Water was born from a single core image of a young woman preparing tea in a future world that was running out of freshwater.

I was interested in Japanese tea culture and its connection with Zen Buddhism, and at the same time I was actively following news about climate change and its impact on freshwater resources. One day these two separate things combined in my head to create the image which contained the main character, the world and the main conflict of Memory of Water in a nutshell. I wanted to write a coming-of-age story, and I was interested in the responsibility that comes with reaching adulthood, and its ethical implications in harsh circumstances.


message 4: by Hazel (new)

Hazel Gaynor (hazelgaynor) | 26 comments Mod
William Morrow wrote: "What inspired you to write your book?"

The Girl Who Came Home was inspired firstly by a lifelong fascination with Titanic, and then by a group of Irish emigrants who left their small parish in County Mayo, and sailed on Titanic from Queenstown, County Cork. The group are known as The Addergoole Fourteen and as steerage passengers their Titanic experience was very different to that of the very wealthy who were already aboard.

My heroine, Maggie Murphy, was inspired by the younger girls in that group of fourteen, many of whom were not planning to return to Irish shores.


message 5: by Ariframli (new)

Ariframli | 1 comments What is the main message from your novel?


message 6: by Hazel (new)

Hazel Gaynor (hazelgaynor) | 26 comments Mod
For me, the main message is one of hope. Titanic is such a well-documented tragedy and there was so much loss as a result of the disaster. I wanted to write a novel about the event that approached things from a different angle. Through Maggie we learn how survivors carried that night with them throughout their lives and how, for many, it was the sheer will to survive and the unbreakable ties to loved ones back home, that ultimately give them the strength to carry on.


message 7: by Carrie (new)

Carrie La Seur (carrielaseur) | 20 comments Mod
I started writing The Home Place while very far from home (Australia) and trying to understand the pull that home still had on me. If there's any message (not sure I believe in novels as a polemical vessel), it's that our ties to home can save us in essential ways.


message 8: by C.J. (new)

C.J. | 16 comments Mod
Carrie, I wrote my book from a place of homesickness too. The From-Aways is set in a small seaside New England town not unlike the one I grew up in...at the time I wrote it I was living in New York City and I think, at first, I just wanted to invent myself a town like my home to mess around in. Then, of course, the town got away from me and took on a life of its own...


message 9: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Rotert | 12 comments Mod
At a certain age (deep in my 30's) I became aware that the only reason I survived my life and myself was because I'd been (emotionally) rescued over and over by a handful of people who were utterly committed to non-judgment, love, and compassion. Even, especially, when I was at my worst. So I became very much interested in writing a rather unloveable protagonist who is loved despite herself. A whole cast of characters, actually, who are loved despite themselves. If there was any long-haul inspiration to drive me through this book (and the subsequent ones) it's this story.


message 10: by Katherine (new)

Katherine Harbour (katherineharbour) | 27 comments Mod
My original inspiration for Thorn Jack was the ancient Scottish ballad Tam Lin, which is about a young woman who saves her mortal lover from the fairy queen and a sacrifice. There have been so many other modern versions of this tale, but I wanted mine to be more of a ghost story, as the fairies, in Irish folklore, are associated with the dead. My second inspiration was a spooky book of fairy reports called Visions and Beliefs in the West of Ireland, written in the 1920s by Lady Gregory, a friend to the poet W.B.Yeats.


message 11: by Carrie (new)

Carrie La Seur (carrielaseur) | 20 comments Mod
CJ wrote: "Carrie, I wrote my book from a place of homesickness too. The From-Aways is set in a small seaside New England town not unlike the one I grew up in...at the time I wrote it I was living in New York..."

That sounds wonderful, CJ. I look forward to reading it!


message 12: by M (new)

M Cooley | 21 comments Mod
Homesickness seems to be a driving inspiration for a lot of people. I set Ice Shear in upstate New York because while living in California I missed the landscape and people of the Hudson Valley. A person can take only so many palm trees!

The inspiration for Ice Shear was two fold. I feel like a lot of the crime novels I had read lately were very focused on anti-heroes, and I was really interested in telling the story of human heroism, getting up and fighting the good fight even when you've been knocked down.


message 13: by Lacy (new)

Lacy Crawford | 14 comments Mod
After fifteen years of working with high school seniors, watching them and their parents tread this morass of anxiety and online forms, I had my own baby--and I had new empathy for the kids I'd known, and for their parents. Every year it sees a new set of families step up to the slaughter. Preschool parents talk about college admissions. We can do better than this--we are better than this--and I wanted to tell a funny insider's story to show a way out.


message 14: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Creech | 7 comments Mod
Reading the work of Birute Galdikas and wanting to capture a female character as brave and fearless as she was when she ventured to the wilds of Borneo. Also, the Creed family of perfumers in Paris proved to be an inspirational discovery.


message 15: by Joshilyn (new)

Joshilyn Jackson | 9 comments Mod
Ariframli wrote: "What is the main message from your novel?"

Thanks for posting--- I am not sure I have a message, per se---It's more about exploring some questions, ones that I do not think have easy answers---what does faith look like, how can this owerful force be used for good or ill, is there any such thing as a post=modern miracle, and if so, what does that look like?


message 16: by Mary (new)

Mary McNear (marymcnear) | 22 comments Mod
M.P. Wrote: Homesickness seems to be a driving inspiration for a lot of people.

In a strange way, homesickness has inspired my Butternut Lake Trilogy. The series is based on the lake house in the northern Midwest that I’ve been visiting for a couple weeks each summer since I was a child. I’ve been living in San Francisco for the last twenty years, and although I love it here, I miss the time I spend each summer with my family on this beautiful lake.


message 17: by Emmi (new)

Emmi Itäranta | 19 comments Mod
M.P. wrote: "Homesickness seems to be a driving inspiration for a lot of people. I set Ice Shear in upstate New York because while living in California I missed the landscape and people of the Hudson Valley. ..."

This is really interesting - I never knew that homesickness was such an important inspiration for so many writers. It certainly had an impact on my own writing process as well.

I started writing Memory of Water soon after moving from Finland to the UK, and because I missed Finnish winter, I ended up writing about a main character who has never seen ice or snow but tries to imagine life with them.

I remember reading about a study which found that many authors use vivid childhood memories as material for their writing, so that might explain why homesickness plays so strongly into the experience of writing a novel, especially a debut.


message 18: by Emmi (new)

Emmi Itäranta | 19 comments Mod
Ariframli wrote: "What is the main message from your novel?"

I'm not sure that my novel has a message as such, but I hope that it will make people pay more attention to their relationship with their environment and the responsibilities that go with that. Which is not to say that the answers are necessarily straightforward or easy; when it comes to important issues, they are more likely not, and the ethics can be complicated.


message 19: by Mary (new)

Mary McNear (marymcnear) | 22 comments Mod
And maybe you need to miss a place to really want to write about it. Or, maybe, getting distance from it gives you the perspective you need to really see it clearly.


message 20: by C.J. (new)

C.J. | 16 comments Mod
Mary wrote: "And maybe you need to miss a place to really want to write about it. Or, maybe, getting distance from it gives you the perspective you need to really see it clearly."

Absolutely, Mary. I think the distance has a lot to do with it. I wrote about New England when I was in New York, and New York once I moved to Florida. Next time I move maybe I'll write about swamps and gators...


back to top

140707

New Voices in Fiction Authors from William Morrow

unread topics | mark unread