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Covering: The Hidden Assault on Our Civil Rights
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Covering: The Hidden Assault on Our Civil Rights

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message 1: by Bella (last edited Apr 16, 2018 02:15PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Bella | 15 comments Covering: The Hidden Assault on our Civil Rights by Kenji Yoshino
Reviewed by Bella Mendoza

This is a non-fiction book written by Kenji Yoshino, a professor of law at New York University of Law. This book is an analysis of the worlds view on minority rights from Yoshinos' perspective. Yoshino is a gay Asian-American and he uses his experiences to explain how societies expectations affect people. He has a theory of a type of discrimination he calls covering. The demand to cover comes from conversion and passing demands in the past that have evolved. Covering is explained as the expectation of minorities to hide their differences and pretend they do not exist. He explains how asking people to hide who they are is harmful because it is telling them that who they are is not okay. This book goes into depth on where covering exists and where this theory originated.

This book really opened my mind up to a new way of thinking. I thought that Yoshino made what could easily be a disheartening lecture into a warm and inviting discussion. He used a lot of personal anecdotes, which made his theory personal and easy to relate to. Also, I think that Yoshino's high levels of education show through his vocabulary and writing style. Many authors that are as highly educated as him can seem like they put themselves above others, but Yoshino does not do that; through reading his book I feel like I got to know him as a friend and I enjoy the way he thinks and speaks about the world. I feel like I am more aware of the world around me now that I have read this amazing book.


message 2: by Moe (new)

Moe | 10 comments I don't usually read a lot of non-fiction, but this book sounds interesting. It seems like a book that can lead to a lot of thinking about the world which I enjoy. It is interesting to see the world from the perspective of different people.


message 3: by Jay (new)

Jay | 13 comments Good job describing the story, and the meaning of "covering" and it does sound a like a book that would leave you asking questions.


message 4: by Erika (new)

Erika Thorsen | 47 comments Mod
What's one anecdote that really stood out to you or was his most powerful (and why)?


Bella | 15 comments Erika wrote: "What's one anecdote that really stood out to you or was his most powerful (and why)?"

When he is talking about coming out to the world, rather than just his family. In this story he says his parents were upset with him for making his queerness his identity. This really stood out to me because I have felt like people want me to cover my queerness as well and have said it in a similar way. Most people would not openly label themselves as queer/homophobic but yet many still impose these demands on people without knowing it.


Bella | 15 comments Moe wrote: "I don't usually read a lot of non-fiction, but this book sounds interesting. It seems like a book that can lead to a lot of thinking about the world which I enjoy. It is interesting to see the worl..."

This was one of the first non-fiction books I have read that I actually enjoyed. I think that if anyone wants to expend their ideas on equality this book is a good start; it opened my eyes to problems i didn't even realize existed.


Bella | 15 comments Jay wrote: "Good job describing the story, and the meaning of "covering" and it does sound a like a book that would leave you asking questions."

This book sparked a lot of questions for me in a positive way; I think it will have an effect on how i view the world forever.


message 8: by Ur (Maddie) (new)

Ur (Maddie) Mom (Miles) | 13 comments Bella wrote: "Covering: The Hidden Assault on our Civil Rights by Kenji Yoshino
Reviewed by Bella Mendoza

This is a non-fiction book written by Kenji Yoshino, a professor of law at New York University of Law. T..."


I don't usually read this type of Non-Fiction book, but you made it seem interesting. I am excited to look more in depth of this book, and am interested in reading it myself.


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