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message 1: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1349 comments Graphic novels seem to be the big trend now for early elementary readers. I've seen my nieces and nephews looking at them and some of the 4th graders in a classroom I was in earlier this week also had graphic novels. I'm not super thrilled by the trend. I can see the benefits for reluctant readers/kids with learning differences but for the average reader, I feel like it cheapens the story to turn it into a series of small text bites with more emphasis on the pictures. While I liked books with pictures, the images never matched up to what was in my head. I was such a nerd. For me it's all about the storytelling and imagination. The Babysitters Club so does not need to be a graphic novel. Kristy's Great Idea: Full Color Edition My generation read them just fine with words and without pictures.

What do you think?


message 2: by Mike (new)

Mike M (mke__m) | 15 comments I certainly think kids should learn to take in graphic novels, but not as a substitute for reading. We actually need a new verb for consuming them. It seems to take an entirely different mindset. It's closer to poetry than prose--graphic novelists employ a kind of visual prosody that communicates on other levels than denoted by the words or even explicitly depicted in the pictures. It's not at all like the comic books I enjoyed as a child. (I still love Asterix, forty years after first seeing him.) I've tried "reading" some graphic novels myself, but I just can't seem to "get" it. So I'm all for teaching graphic novels, but in addition to regular reading.


message 3: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2275 comments Mod
I am not super thrilled by the trend either, but it may be the only way to get some kids into reading anything at all. I have read a few children's graphic novels, I especially like the ones by Raina Telgemeier and Victoria Jamieson, which have a little more "meat" to them.

Smile by Raina Telgemeier
Drama
Sisters
Ghosts

Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson
The Great Pet Escape
All's Faire in Middle School


message 4: by Cheryl, Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 6171 comments Mod
I agree with Phil. It's yet another medium, one that some will find more appealing, some will find more difficult. It definitely exercises the mind and develops different skills!

I find it challenging, and sometimes exhilirating, to ocassionally engage with a graphic novel, but I'll never stop reading either picture-books, or text-only fiction, or non-fiction whether illustrated or not.


message 5: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1349 comments Older niece (3rd grade) is reading Smile and Roller Girl. She wasn't a confident reader until this year. I'll look into some of the others Beverly mentioned for her.

My younger niece (2nd grade) LOVES to read and will devour anything. She was proud of herself for skipping a level in reading. She doesn't mind lots of text and some pictures as long as she can read the words.

Her brother (kindergarten) has also found graphic novels are his thing because many are geared towards young boys. He's into Dog Man (Dog Man, #1) by Dav Pilkey . He likes more violent stories than picture books typically have (zombies!) He has learning "issues" (plus ADD and anxiety) and learning the alphabet was really hard for him. I'm not sure he recognizes all his letters yet so in that case I can see the appeal of a graphic novel.


message 6: by Manybooks (last edited Mar 31, 2018 03:45PM) (new)

Manybooks | 7020 comments Mod
Funny, but for me, with graphic novels, if there is not enough text, I often have comprehension issues if too much is to be deduced from the illustrations alone (just like if you give me instructions that are mostly diagrams, I am hopelessly lost and frustrated within seconds).


message 7: by Cheryl, Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 6171 comments Mod
I agree, Gundula. Reading text and reading pictures are *both* valuable skills to learn. Otherwise how do you assemble inexpensive furniture? ;)


message 8: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7020 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "I agree, Gundula. Reading text and reading pictures are *both* valuable skills to learn. Otherwise how do you assemble inexpensive furniture? ;)"

Tell me about it, I suck at Ikea!


message 10: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1349 comments Oldest niece is really into The Tea Dragon Society
She's obsessed with tea now and has to have (herbal) tea every day. "It's not a good day without tea."

She's also read and loved Zita the Spacegirl series. I've seen her reading Smile and Roller Girl.


message 11: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7020 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "Oldest niece is really into The Tea Dragon Society
She's obsessed with tea now and has to have (herbal) tea every day. "It's not a good day without tea."

She's also read and loved..."


I wonder if she would also like Anne of Green Gables: A Graphic Novel. This was pretty good, but not an absolute favourite, although a decent enough intro to AOGG.


message 12: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1349 comments Manybooks wrote: "
I wonder if she would also like Anne of Green Gables: A Graphic Novel. This was pretty good, but not an absolute favourite, although a decent enough intro to AOGG. .."


I looked it up last night and added it to the TBR pile for her. I know she'd love it. Even I struggled with Anne's wordiness and the language at first. Then I saw the wonderful miniseries on TV (CBC/PBS Kevin Sullivan production- Megan Follows IS Anne) and fell in love. There's a new graphic novel update of Little Women coming out too. By the time her birthday and Christmas roll around, she could be into something totally different but I can try to make suggestions. So many books, so little time! I was such a voracious reader and had more time to read. Kids are too busy these days.


message 13: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7020 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "Manybooks wrote: "
I wonder if she would also like Anne of Green Gables: A Graphic Novel. This was pretty good, but not an absolute favourite, although a decent enough intro to AOGG. .."

I looked ..."


I did not love the artwork, but it is a great introduction to Anne.


message 14: by Manybooks (last edited Nov 26, 2019 08:11AM) (new)

Manybooks | 7020 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "Manybooks wrote: "
I wonder if she would also like Anne of Green Gables: A Graphic Novel. This was pretty good, but not an absolute favourite, although a decent enough intro to AOGG. .."

I looked ..."


I agree that Megan Follows is Anne and Colleen Dewhurst was (and is) Marilla. However, I really only liked the first two mini-series, as the one about WWI, sorry, it was just terrible and no longer Anne-like at all. I would however also suggest the BBC Anne of Avonlea, as while it is quite a bit more theatrical, it really does majorly follow the books, something that especially the Kevin Sullivan mini-series sequel does not really do (and it really is too bad that the first of the BBC mini-series, the one based on Anne of Green Gables, is somehow lost).


message 15: by QNPoohBear (last edited Jun 05, 2018 05:22PM) (new)

QNPoohBear | 1349 comments Just turned 8 year old niece is reading her cousin's books now. Smile is a big hit with both girls, especially since 9 1/2 year old has just been told she needs braces. 8 year old probably will too. Guess this book is the new Judy Blume? I'll have to flip through it soon and see what I think.

Almost 6 year old nephew continues to obsess over the Dogman series Dog Man. He was super excited to learn he could read some of his sight words in the book. He also finally figured out the pun "You gotta be kitten me!" (eyerolls from the adults). For him, I think graphic novels are a good teaching tool but for the precocious girls, I think graphic novels are a bit of a cop out. I'm going to try American Girl books next-the ones with the illustrations- as a compromise.


message 16: by Natalia (new)

Natalia Heaney | 1 comments I've had a few graphic novels as review books in the past couple of years, and the appeal is lost on me. I lived and worked (and taught) in Asia for a while, and they're pretty big where I was, however...
I've got to be honest: they look like comics with a fancier name.

But then I also don't understand all those people who prefer reviewing books via a YouTube video. I didn't think I was that old, but maybe I am!


message 17: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7020 comments Mod
Natalia Heaney wrote: "I've had a few graphic novels as review books in the past couple of years, and the appeal is lost on me. I lived and worked (and taught) in Asia for a while, and they're pretty big where I was, how..."

Video reviews? Yuck ... (and I hate GIFs as well). And graphic novels are not really my thing either.


message 18: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1349 comments I don't understand video reviews either. I'm old school. I'm a trained librarian just before everything became digital. I was an undergrad literature major before that and I was taught to write fully thought out book reviews in words.

I read some reviews for Smile and it's a graphic memoir which is a little different. I MUST read it because the author appears to be around my age. I can tell my niece what it was like to have braces back then in the dark ages of the late 1980s and how it was better when her Daddy had braces back in the less dark ages of the 1990s.

My mom taught nursery school and as an educator, parent and grandparent SHE prefers the classics and kids should be reading and enjoying the books as is. I'm Ok with compromise as long as they're still learning to read. Pictures and simple text help them learn and enjoy reading. I'm giving the nieces and nephews one fun book THEY would pick out and one classic/one I loved when I was their age now the girls are old enough to read independently.


message 19: by Manybooks (last edited Jun 06, 2018 07:11PM) (new)

Manybooks | 7020 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "I don't understand video reviews either. I'm old school. I'm a trained librarian just before everything became digital. I was an undergrad literature major before that and I was taught to write ful..."

I think we are pretty alike with regard to how we review. I would never use GIFs in a review and pictures only rarely. For me, a review means printed words, a written text, always (and I also tend to edit my reviews over and over again, as I am always tweaking them). I also PREFER the classics as is, but do think that for a general introduction to a given classic piece of literature, a graphic novel version does seem to work to pique interest (especially for reluctant readers).


message 20: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7020 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "Manybooks wrote: "
I wonder if she would also like Anne of Green Gables: A Graphic Novel. This was pretty good, but not an absolute favourite, although a decent enough intro to AOGG. .."

I looked ..."


Do you know when the Little Women graphic novel is coming out and do you have a link for it? I would like to try it.


message 21: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1349 comments Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy: Little Women it's recommended for readers who liked Smile and Roller Girl. My nieces love both of those books. Oldest niece was amused that Reina in Smile is around my age.


message 22: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7020 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy: Little Women it's recommended for readers who liked Smile and Roller Girl. My nieces love both of those books. Oldest niece was amused that Reina in Smile is..."

I just do not think that this would in any way be my cup of tea, at least with regard to the illustrations (not a fan of modernisations).


message 23: by Cheryl, Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 6171 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy: Little Women it's recommended for readers who liked Smile and Roller Girl."

Thank you for the link. I did not think that I would be interested, but Gundula's rejection piqued my curiosity. Turns out I am interested... I suppose *because* I don't particularly like the original.


message 24: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1349 comments One Dead Spy (Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales, #1) by Nathan Hale
Nathan Hale's Hazardous Histories are designed for Middle School supplemental reading aimed at boys. I did not enjoy the first book in the series but then I read about Harriet Tubman and liked that one much more. That one will potentially go to older niece who won't read anything but graphic novels.

I have a few other graphic novels and biographies to look at. I'll come back with titles of any good ones.


message 25: by Cheryl, Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 6171 comments Mod
Thanks!


message 26: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1349 comments No Girls Allowed: Tales of Daring Women Dressed as Men for Love, Freedom and Adventure

Short tales of daring women through history from the Ancient Egyptians to the Civil War. Some I've heard of, others are new to me. I like these short, simple biographies. I dislike the black and white drawings. The comic style panels make illustration details hard to see. Girls could theoretically use this as a coloring book if they wanted. This book is on the maybe list for Niece 11.


message 27: by Cheryl, Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 6171 comments Mod
I'll add that to my list, thanks!


message 28: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1349 comments The Underground Abductor (An Abolitionist Tale about Harriet Tubman) (Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales, #5) by Nathan Hale seemed to be a hit with almost 11 year old. She found it where I had left it on the table and stuck her nose in it. I have some fantasy graphic novels on my TBR list for her. Maybe one historical or biographical and one fantasy book for her birthday? I'd like her to learn something about history because so far she said "kind of" on Civil War and she didn't really know much about the Revolutionary War either. *sigh* I'm going to write to Nathan Hale and see if he can come up with a story about the founding of the Industrial Revolution in America so we can sell it in the shop at work and kids will actually pay attention to "that guy everyone's been talking about all day."


message 29: by Cheryl, Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 6171 comments Mod
Great idea! I'd be interested to read a graphic novel of the development of the Industrial Rev.


message 30: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1349 comments Maddy Kettle: The Adventure of the Thimblewitch Maddy Kettle The Adventure of the Thimblewitch by Eric Orchard

Mandy Kettle and her parents were minding their own business selling books when the Thimblewitch and Spider Goblins came and turned her parents into rats. Mandy is eager to find the Thimblewitch and make her change Mr. and Mrs. Kettle back into humans. The Spider Goblins arrive and steal away Mandy's parents and her floating toad Ralph. Mandy is more determined than ever to get her family back. She embarks on a journey, making new friends and surprises along the way.

This is one weird story. I'm a textual reader. I need backstory and world building to explain who the Kettles are, what this strange world is and how the weirdness works. My mom says this was right up the alley of niece 1 (soon to be 11) but the ending was stupid. I think the plot twists were lame in general. The world is a strange, dusty planet with peaks and floating creatures. There are cloud cartographers in the form of a bear and raccoon who fly around in a not hot air balloon, but moon dust balloon; animated scarecrows and other odd things happening in the story. It just isn't my thing.

The illustrations are cartoonish, aimed at younger children. I didn't like the dark color palette of this world. The Spider Goblins are very scary and even the Thimblewitch is a bit scary looking. I would not recommend this book to sensitive young readers.

Ages 8-10 read alone
Ages 6-7 read aloud if not scared of creepy illustrations


message 31: by Cheryl, Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 6171 comments Mod
Hm. I've loved quite a few graphic novels by now, but this doesn't appeal for the reasons you state. Even though at first glance, title and blurb do seem intriguing. Maybe the target audience 'reads' very differently.


message 32: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1349 comments I started How Mirka Got Her Sword How Mirka Got Her Sword by Barry Deutsch a graphic novel set in a Hassidic Jewish community with a fantasy twist. Um this one is just too weird for me. I don't get it... not yet anyway. I thought the plot would be up niece's ally but I'm not sure she'd understand the concept of the Hassidic community unless she was more aware of the Orthodox neighbor she met at my parents' house a few times. I'm not into fantasy enough to appreciate this story but it's gotten good reviews and was on the recommended list at amightygirl.com

I have a few more to look through. Weather and time permitting, I'll stop at the library again tomorrow after work or maybe the other library if I feel like walking a mile up the hill to shop and read.


message 33: by Cheryl, Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 6171 comments Mod
The blurb mentions 'preteen commotion' so that's a big clue right there that the audience isn't universal... thank you for your comments!


message 34: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2275 comments Mod
Another graphic memoir I read a few years ago:

Little White Duck : A Childhood in China by Na Liu
Little White Duck A Childhood in China by Na Liu

Another author/illustrator of graphic novels is Matt Phelan:
Around the World
Around the World by Matt Phelan
The Storm in the Barn
The Storm in the Barn by Matt Phelan
Snow White: A Graphic Novel (this one is classified as "Young Adult" in our library, so evaluate first for younger readers)
Snow White A Graphic Novel by Matt Phelan


message 35: by Cheryl, Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 6171 comments Mod
One I did enjoy that I remember offhand isAquicorn Cove by Katie O'Neill. Oh, and how could I forget for even a moment The Prince and the Dressmaker. And The Tea Dragon Society.


message 36: by Cheryl, Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 6171 comments Mod
Oh, and I gave Around the World five stars.


message 37: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1349 comments The Tea Dragon Society is niece #1's favorite!

Aquicorn Cove looks up her alley too. I'll have to find out if she's read it. Niece #2 would love it too.

Around the World is up my alley and what I'm looking for to teach my nieces and nephews history. So far I am disappointed in their school curriculum. When the heck to they learn U.S. history?

I was able to get No Girls Allowed Tales of Daring Women Dressed as Men for Love, Freedom and Adventure by Susan Hughes from paperbackswap.com
I will gift it to one of the nieces, probably the older one and she can give it to her cousin when she's done.


message 38: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7020 comments Mod
Real Friends, I really enjoyed this and like that this was also based on the author’s childhood.

Also enjoyed Be Prepared but it sometimes hit a bit close to home (and did not really like the greenish colour scheme).

But yes, I absolutely did find Anya's Ghost too creepy.


message 39: by Cheryl, Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 6171 comments Mod
Gundula, I just added all three of those to my to-read list!


message 40: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7020 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "Gundula, I just added all three of those to my to-read list!"

I recommend both Real Friends and Be Prepared.

But I did not much like Anya's Ghost


message 41: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1349 comments Niece read Real Friends but I don't know if she liked it. My mom got Be Prepared for my cousin's 10 year old. My mom really liked it. I finished How Mirka Got Her Sword and it was not for me. Full review to come.


message 42: by Cheryl, Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 6171 comments Mod
Definitely 'different strokes for different folks' in this category!


message 43: by Manybooks (last edited Nov 26, 2019 08:15AM) (new)

Manybooks | 7020 comments Mod
I did enjoy All's Faire in Middle School but also found the middle school dramatics both a bit exaggerated and also hitting too close to home for comfort (and no, I did not enjoy Imogene's little brother Felix and how he is often in my opinion coddled and favoured by especially the mother).


message 44: by Cheryl, Newbery Club host (last edited Nov 26, 2019 12:57PM) (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 6171 comments Mod
I hope you don't mind me swerving a bit off topic, but your comment made me remember something I've been trying to think about & bring up for discussion. I need to remember that stories are usually told from the perspective of the protag, even if not when from their pov.

Now I've not read Faire, so this may not be a good example of the situation... but to pick on that as an example: Could it be that Imogene feels as if Felix is favoured, but he isn't really, and she just doesn't remember or mention the times she's been treated and the times he's been scolded?

As I said, in this book it may be entirely that Felix is indeed favoured. But sometimes when reading a story it's not always easy to see the world objectively, as the protag's perspective is inherently biased.

Thoughts? Is this a question worthy of its own topic?


message 45: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7020 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "I hope you don't mind me swerving a bit off topic, but your comment made me remember something I've been trying to think about & bring up for discussion. I need to remember that stories are usually..."

Good point and I am the wrong person to ask as I saw in Felix my little sister who I always thought got away with murder.


message 46: by Cheryl, Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 6171 comments Mod
Thanks. Sorry for that. I hope she turned out to be a good person and that you two can play nice now. None of my business, though.

I will say I didn't like my younger brothers when we were kids, and now none of us make the effort to stay in touch... and I think that's a shame. Oh well.

Glad that most book parents are more careful. ;)


message 47: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7020 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "Thanks. Sorry for that. I hope she turned out to be a good person and that you two can play nice now. None of my business, though.

I will say I didn't like my younger brothers when we were kids, a..."


I am kind of the odd person out in my family.


message 48: by QNPoohBear (last edited Nov 27, 2019 01:09PM) (new)


message 49: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7020 comments Mod
Great artwork but not nearly enough text for me in Pemmican Wars, although many readers seem to think that the sparse narrative is great for reluctant readers (but I certainly wanted more words and had lots of questions that remained unanswered).


message 50: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1349 comments E forgot to add to her favorites list...
Cucumber Quest The Doughnut Kingdom (Cucumber Quest, #1) by Gigi D.G. Cucumber Quest: The Doughnut Kingdom

My brother says they love Compass South Compass South (Four Points #1) by Hope Larson trilogy

She came home from the library with
Best Friends (Real Friends, #2) by Shannon Hale Best Friends
Making Friends by Kristen Gudsnuk Making Friends

and some sci-fi book I don't recall the title of. I think she's read ALL the tween graphic novels the library has!


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