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Uglies (Uglies, #1)
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Uglies - Scott Westerfeld

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Abby Munzanreder | 13 comments Uglies (First book in the series) – Scott Westerfeld
Reviewed by Abby Munzanreder

Tally Youngblood is a 15-year-old girl. Fifteen doesn’t seem super important to most people but for Tally and the rest of the kids in Uglyville around her age and younger, turning 16 is probably one of the most important times of their lives. Many of the kids look up to the other soon to be 16 and 16-year-olds. Once they turn 16, they will get the life changing operation that turns them into beautiful god/goddess like beings. Tally is very excited for her operation. Even in her perfect town things still go wrong. She needs the help of her Friends Shay and Peris so that her life still goes on normally. This is when they start on an adventure of a lifetime and find some new people along the way.

This has been such an interesting book to read, it is a fictional book, but it doesn’t seem too farfetched to where it just gets weird. This has been an amazing book for thinking about “What would I do?” situations. It forces you to think about tough situations and what you would decide to do. Tally and Shay are well-built, complex characters, while some other characters stay somewhat mysterious and lacking in detail, leaving open the possibility for further character development later in the series. Having some mysterious characters also helps keep you interested in the book, although, it’s not hard to stay interested with a plot involving action, and a love triangle, and Tally’s constant internal struggle over choosing to save herself or save her friends. Scott Westerfeld has his own way of finding his reader’s attention in a much better way than just throwing in cliff hanger after cliff hanger. Shay and Tally bring you on plenty of adventures in the wilderness and in the world of friendship as well. Some of the characters will make you very angry and it makes you question what true values of a friendship are.


message 2: by Cassie (last edited Apr 11, 2018 02:37PM) (new)

Cassie Matter | 18 comments This book is one of my favorites! I definitely got angry at parts too, just as you said. However, personally I disagree with your statement about how the idea doesn't seem too far-fetched. Although people do like to alter their appearance in many ways, to me the idea of having fake skin and ceramic bones is insanely unrealistic, but nonetheless interesting.


message 3: by Sophia (new)

Sophia | 16 comments I really enjoy the concept of this book, and with the rise of plastic surgery operations, it really makes you wonder how far we are from something like this happening in our own real world. I also really enjoyed reading your review, and I feel like this book would also leave you thinking about the standards of beauty in our world and how teenagers are affected by it.


message 4: by Moe (new)

Moe | 10 comments I've heard about this book quite a bit, and before I wasn't sure if it was worth reading. From reading this review I've grown more interesting in checking out the book myself. The premise is intriguing and it makes me wonder what could happen within the story.


message 5: by Catherine (last edited Apr 11, 2018 02:54PM) (new)

Catherine | 12 comments I wonder how the author came up with the concept of this story. It gets you thinking about if you were in that world would you go through with the operation? And if you didn't you would be disowned by everyone.


Abby Munzanreder | 13 comments Cassie wrote: "This book is one of my favorites! I definitely got angry at parts too, just as you said. However, personally I disagree with your statement about how the idea doesn't seem too far-fetched. Although..."
I agree with you saying ceramic bones and fake skin is highly unrealistic but I hadn't thought of that before. I mean people could have pieces of ceramic bones inserted and real bone taken out to alter shape I think but entirely ceramic bones is unrealistic as you said. Also the skin is very very unrealistic but for the idea of the book it seems realistic in the government area but not so much all of the pretty operation.


Abby Munzanreder | 13 comments Sophia wrote: "I really enjoy the concept of this book, and with the rise of plastic surgery operations, it really makes you wonder how far we are from something like this happening in our own real world. I also ..."
I actually hadn't thought a whole lot about how Scott Westerfeld is pushing us to think about beauty standards and how teenagers are affected by it. I now will definitely be thinking about that much more now. I have thought about the future of plastic surgery from this book and it doesn't seem too fake that the government might one day want to change the way we all look.


Abby Munzanreder | 13 comments Catherine wrote: "I wonder how the author came up with the concept of this story. It gets you thinking about if you were in that world would you go through with the operation? And if you didn't you would be disowned..."
I think he probably was trying to go off of a type of topic about how teenagers are affected by beauty standards and he wanted to show how we all are affected by beauty and that it isn't always a good thing (as Sophia had said).


message 9: by Adrian (new)

Adrian | 10 comments I remember reading this book in Sci-Fi and Fantasy. Interesting that this book teaches the lesson that we should wonder if it's better to change our looks just because of society or to just be ourselves.


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