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Writing Process & Programs > Paperback through KDP

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message 1: by lark (new)

lark benobi (larkbenobi) Carrie wrote: "I am finishing my first book and am self-publishing through KDP. I set up the ebook for preorder yesterday.

How do I set up my manuscript for paperback printing through KDP? I am perplexed. Any ad..."


Hi Carrie. You can start by checking out createspace.com . It's the Amazon platform for making print books.


message 2: by lark (new)

lark benobi (larkbenobi) and by the way...a big congratulations!


message 3: by Anita (new)

Anita Dickason (anitadickason) | 65 comments Right now, Amazon now has two options for the print book, upload through Createspace (CS) or use KDP. The scuttlebutt is that KDP will be taking over the print side of the books from CS. KDP has a procedure for transferring print books from CS. I just tested the program with one of my books, and moved it from CS to KDP.

I know KDP has a program that will convert your ebook to a print book, but I haven't used it. You can also upload it yourself, but it will require a print-ready PDF file for both the cover and manuscript.


message 4: by Mark (last edited Mar 29, 2018 04:28PM) (new)

Mark Jones (MarkCJones) | 1 comments Congratulations - I've just finished my first with KDP and I'm currently using Createspace as I've heard a few things about the inflexibility of KDP for producing paperbacks - no complaints with CS so far though and it's pretty straightforward.


message 5: by J.M. (new)

J.M. Lanham | 1 comments Hi Carrie,

I've never tried KDP for print books, primarily because I've been pretty happy with the Createspace process so far.

Lark's right in that you should try and familiarize yourself with Createspace by visiting their site; they have a ton of resources and help files, and once you're ready to tackle your print book, you can choose to have Createspace walk you through the process from book description to finalizing your files.

The biggest hangups I've had with Createspace have been in the way I've set up files on my end. The bleed, for example, is the amount of space on each side of the page that's allowed for trimming. This empty space is necessary to account for cutting discrepancies once your book is actually printed and bound.

Same goes for margins and gutters. The gutter space is the space attached to the binding, and needs a little extra when compared to say the outside margin so the printer doesn't accidentally print text so close to the crease that readers can't even see it.

Just to give you an example with some actual numbers: I write my books using Word. You can go to Format, Document, and it will bring up a "margins and layout" window. These are the margin data for my last paperback:

Top: 1"
Bottom" 0.6"
Inside: 0.1"
Outside: 0.5"
Gutter: 0.63"

From edge
Header: 0.5"
Footer: 0.5"

This was for a 5.25" X 8" print book, so depending on your desired trim size, the numbers may need adjusting. But, if you want to play around with these, you can try creating a new Word doc, experimenting with how this print layout looks, then go from there.

Once you figure out how to create a print book via Word, you can save it as a .pdf document, upload the file to Createspace, then use the Createspace file previewer to see exactly how your final print book will look. Createspace also has great (and automatic) software that will point out potential issues within your book once it's uploaded, e.g. "Some words are outside the safe trim area," and other tips like that.

It's also important to keep in mind that while KDP has an excellent spell-checker, Createspace does not, so it's always a good idea to run the file through KDP first. But, sounds like you've already got that one taken care of :)

The best thing about Createspace is you can play around with all these tools without publishing your book to the masses, so don't be afraid to get in there and see how everything looks. Hope that helps a little! It's a process, but if you keep your head up and take everything one step at a time you'll have it mastered in no time.

Have a great weekend!


message 6: by Lila (new)

Lila Diller I actually prefer KDP to Createspace, except that they haven't opened Author Copies to all KDP authors yet. For giveaways and any events, book signings or book fairs, you may go to, author copies are a must. But Createspace charges more for their print proofs--and you're required to order a proof before you publish. So there are reasons to do both, which is what I've done.

Both have templates you can use to copy and paste each chapter into for each bleed size. It's easier if you use the template from the beginning, but if you didn't, it can still be done; it's just a bit of a pain. You can also use Draft2Digital to create a digital file and then upload that for the print version, but it will require some tweaking.


message 7: by H.E. (new)

H.E. Bulstrode (goodreadscomhebulstrode) | 84 comments I've used KDP to create paperbacks, and although I found my first attempt at this something of a puzzle, it was easier for the subsequent volume. As has been pointed out, you will need to upload your manuscript as a pdf, but you can download a template for this from KDP. You can also use your Kindle cover image as the front cover for your paperback, but make sure that all of your key cover elements fall within the cut-offs indicated on the print cover preview section. I've never used Createspace, as being based in the UK I've heard that there is a lag with shipping. If you're in the US, this shouldn't be an issue. Good luck!


message 8: by Tony (new)

Tony Nash | 29 comments Create Space is a damned sight easier to use to produce a print book than the new Amazon print system. Previously, it was very easy, but now I just can't get a cover to be accepted, even though I am within two thousandths of an inch of the required size on one axis and exactly the right size on the other. Also, using their 'Create a cover' application, the system doesn't seem to allow one to upload bios and the synopsis.


message 9: by Colin (new)

Colin Ward (inasmanywords) | 12 comments My advice would always be to do all the adapting and sizing yourself, and upload a print ready PDF. This gives YOU THE CONTROL.

If you need any help or advice about how to do PDFs properly, get in touch. There are some extra technical details to make it a genuine Print Ready file than just clicking "save as PDF."


message 10: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl Hefferon | 1 comments Please provide advise on how to make PDFs properly - I'm only aware of the SAVE AS PDF process. Thanks very much!


message 11: by Noor (new)

Noor Al-Shanti | 148 comments I just tried out using KDP to make a print version of one of my ebooks. It wasn't too bad, but I was sad to find out I can't get the cheaper author copies here in Canada (it says it "can't ship" to my address, even though when I publish it it's perfectly OK with me ordering a copy and shipping it when I'm paying full price.)

For the cover I used their calculator thing, which downloads a file with the dimensions I needed, and then I used those exact numbers and margins to create a publisher file. I then added my cover image and titles and back cover info on publisher, saved as PDF and it accepted it just fine.

Same with the actual manuscript. Instead of using a template or something I looked through their step by step guide and did all the modifications to my file that way, such as changing up the margins, formatting titles, and so on.


message 12: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Percy (christopherpercy) | 2 comments I found the template quite helpful from Amazon and had to do a chapter at a time for the best result.

Also you need to check that you don't put a short sentence on the next page, I found using Widows and Orphans in Word takes care of this. Plus do consider that paragraphs with breaks starting at the top of a page should have a * or similar mark on the previous page to note the start of a new bit of story for the reader.

The cover was a little harder to do as a spine and back cover was required. I had to use GIMP (free software) to create the correct size layers to ensure it worked. This allows you to save as a PDF too.


message 13: by Lori-Ann (new)

Lori-Ann Claude | 76 comments Noor wrote: "I just tried out using KDP to make a print version of one of my ebooks. It wasn't too bad, but I was sad to find out I can't get the cheaper author copies here in Canada (it says it "can't ship" to..."

I'm in Canada as well and had chosen to use KDP Print instead of Createspace because CS seems on its way out. But to complete the order of the proof, I needed to put a US address. So I didn't complete the process while I considered whether or not to continue with KDP for the print book.

Did you make it available before seeing what the book looks like printed? I'd hesitate to make it available to anyone without first seeing a proof but how do I get one without pestering one of my US friends?

In my case, I used the cover template KDP provided based on trim size/# pages but when I uploaded the cover (built using GIMP then saved as a PDF) I had a warning that the cover wasn't quite wide enough (height was fine). So there seems to be a variation between the template and the validation of the uploaded cover, at least in my case.

I also did all the formatting. I ended up creating a Word template that has all the styling I needed for all the formatting for print. I didn't like the Kindle Create Add-in for Word.

When I uploaded the text file, after fixing the link warnings, the only warnings I got was about the author image which said is 199 dpi. My map was fine. I don't understand how it could think the pic is not 300 dpi because I did the exact same thing for both the author picture and map and I had no warning on the resolution of the map.

I now embed my Word style book template in all the manuscripts I edit so that when it comes to formatting the next books for print, most of the work will be done (it can get tedious).

I did turn on automatic hyphenation but had to check them. A couple of times, Word didn't do a good job.

All in all, I found using KDP print easy to upload to/understand what had to be done, it's just limited for a Canadian author which kind of sucks.


message 14: by Noor (new)

Noor Al-Shanti | 148 comments Lori-Ann wrote: "Noor wrote: "I just tried out using KDP to make a print version of one of my ebooks. It wasn't too bad, but I was sad to find out I can't get the cheaper author copies here in Canada (it says it "c..."

Yeah, I really hope they can fix that and let us get proofs and author copies here in Canada.

I did publish it before seeing a physical copy, but my sales, even for e-book are so low that I highly doubt anyone will find and buy it before I get the copy I ordered at full price. I figure once I see it if there are any issues I can fix them or unpublish.


message 15: by Noor (new)

Noor Al-Shanti | 148 comments I don't mean to double post, but I wanted to report that I recently got the paperback version of my fantasy collection that I made through kdp. It arrived a few days before the listed arrival date, which was nice. It also looks great! I am very impressed with the quality of it. I chose the cream colored paper and matte style and it looks just like the other novels on my bookshelf.

Right now the only downside is the whole not shipping proofs and author copies to Canada thing, which I got around by publishing it first and then just ordering it as if I was a customer through amazon.com.


message 16: by Duncan (new)

Duncan Reyneke (duncanjreyneke) | 8 comments I just released my second novel, Bay City Monsters, on KDP and really want to get the better of Goodreads for marketing, this time around. I've been a bit of a fairweather friend in recent years, but the community here is amazing, I really feel like this is an opportunity I shouldn't pass up.


message 17: by Wendy (new)

Wendy Gamble (wendygamblesf) | 12 comments Noor wrote: "I don't mean to double post, but I wanted to report that I recently got the paperback version of my fantasy collection that I made through kdp. It arrived a few days before the listed arrival date,..."

I live in Canada and was able to order author copies at discount for my KDP book. Click on the three dots in the bookshelf to get the option or talk to customer service. Shipping and conversion to Canadian make it more expensive than if we could get it in Canada at that price, but it's still much cheaper than buying it like a customer.


message 18: by Noor (new)

Noor Al-Shanti | 148 comments Thanks so much for the tip Wendy. I'll go contact them and see if I can get it sorted out!


message 19: by Mark (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments Great advice, Wendy. Maybe one day Amazon.ca will provide a local service payable in Loonies.


message 20: by Anna (new)

Anna Faversham (annafaversham) | 544 comments I've just done my first paperback through KDP. I first tried using their guided templates and I began to lose my all-important cool! Grr...

So I switched to their blank template and it was easy peasy and just like J.M. explains at the head of this thread. I even enjoyed doing it.

I hope that by now, you're even ahead of me. I'm just transferring my Word copy to a PDF for my second paperback.

Can anyone tell me if an author buys, say, 5 books to give away or sell to local outlets - does this register in the charts? I realize that the author will not get a royalty for them, but surely they should register in the charts? Anyone know?


message 21: by Wendy (new)

Wendy Gamble (wendygamblesf) | 12 comments Author copies don't show in the sales report you click on to see your sales. It makes sense they wouldn't count as sales if it's the author buying them. Author's could change their sales stats that way.


message 22: by Anna (last edited Jun 06, 2018 01:55AM) (new)

Anna Faversham (annafaversham) | 544 comments Thanks for responding, Wendy. Oh yes, I understand that completely - they would not show in the sales report but my question was whether they show in the charts.

If an author buys books to make available to bookshops or to sell at fetes or whatever, surely they should show in the charts? If not, then I now understand why good writers' paperback books are stuck down in the several million mark.

As I have only just put my first order in for paperbacks, a grand total of five, to give to my family, I began to wonder...


message 23: by Jenna (new)

Jenna Thatcher (jenna_thatcher) | 132 comments So on a whole, would you say kdp is finally at the level of createspace at this point, or not yet?


message 24: by Anna (new)

Anna Faversham (annafaversham) | 544 comments I can't tell, Jenna, because I've only used KDP. All I can say is that it seemed trouble free once I'd abandoned the awful guided templates.


message 25: by Jenna (new)

Jenna Thatcher (jenna_thatcher) | 132 comments Anna Faversham wrote: "I can't tell, Jenna, because I've only used KDP. All I can say is that it seemed trouble free once I'd abandoned the awful guided templates."

Fair enough. I think for laziness' sake, I'll keep my books on createspace, but since eventually Amazon will incorporate it, I'll probably have to make that leap eventually...


message 26: by Lori-Ann (last edited Jun 07, 2018 05:50PM) (new)

Lori-Ann Claude | 76 comments Anna Faversham wrote: "Thanks for responding, Wendy. Oh yes, I understand that completely - they would not show in the sales report but my question was whether they show in the charts.

If an author buys books to make a..."


What "charts" are you talking about? The only way for any type of agency to track a sale is when you actually buy the books. As they are author copies, they don't count toward any ranking. If you want books in book shops to count, have the bookshop buy it from where you have the book available. One thing to remember, Amazon sales of books are not accounted for in many places if you as the publisher aren't registered like a traditional publisher is.


message 27: by Anna (new)

Anna Faversham (annafaversham) | 544 comments Oh this is disappointing, Lori-Ann. Thank you for info.


message 28: by J.M. (new)

J.M. Blake (jmblake) | 2 comments Cheryl wrote: "Please provide advise on how to make PDFs properly - I'm only aware of the SAVE AS PDF process. Thanks very much!"

Not sure how much of this can help, but I used Reedsy to format for KDP. I tried to do it on my own with all the measuring and "edges" and got extremely frustrated. It was free and KDP took it perfectly.

You will need to upload each chapter separately but, if you get desperate, its an option.


message 29: by S.A. (last edited Jun 07, 2018 07:07PM) (new)

S.A. Battaglia (sabattaglia) | 5 comments Lori-Ann wrote: "What "charts" are you talking about? The only way for any type of agency to track a sale is when you actually buy the books. As they are author copies, they don't count toward any ranking. If you want books in book shops to count, have the bookshop buy it from where you have the book available. One thing to remember, Amazon sales of books are not accounted for in many places if you as the publisher aren't registered like a traditional publisher is."

Hi Lori-Ann,

The part about being registered as a traditional publisher caught my eye. What does that entail? How would one go about registering correctly? I've not yet published a novel, but am doing everything I can to ensure I take the right steps. I will likely use KDP. I appreciate your time.

Sincerely,

S.A.


message 30: by Lori-Ann (new)

Lori-Ann Claude | 76 comments S.A. wrote: "The part about being registered as a traditional publisher caught my eye. What does that entail? How would one go about registering correctly? I've not yet published a novel, but am doing everything I can to ensure I take the right steps. I will likely use KDP. I appreciate your time..."

That's a really, really complex question. I'm not suggesting you register as a "traditional" publisher and I doubt it's worth it. As a self-published author, you already know all your sales because you will track them wherever you distribute your book.

Nielsen Book Scan is probably the most widely used sales tracker agency but its information is only as good as the information that publishers/distributors/retailers/marketplaces/etc. give it (I believe they get most of their info from major bookstores).

A Book Scan number doesn't necessarily give the information that is accurate (I suggest you google this) because there are multiple ways of looking at books: number of printed copies, how many shipped, how many each distributor (like a book store) sold, and of course, the Nielsen Book Scan number. But that's just for print books. eBook sales are often not reported to anyone.

Really, the best way to make books available to bookstores is to distribute your print book via IngramSpark because that's where most bookstores go to purchase their books.

On this, I am not an expert.

Use KDP to distribute your book, track your Amazon sales in the KDP report, use Amazon's sale ranking after you publish to have an idea how you're doing (on Amazon). Decide whether you will distribute your book elsewhere or not.

There is no requirement to register as a "publisher" to self-publish a book. "You" are the publisher. But it does mean having to learn what publishers "do" (that is, format a book, figure out where to distribute it, make it available to distributors, promote...)


message 31: by Steven (new)

Steven Nedeau | 28 comments Jenna wrote: "So on a whole, would you say kdp is finally at the level of createspace at this point, or not yet?"

I've been using createspace and watching kdp. The createspace system of setting up your book is easy. Cover creation is a snap. The interior templates are very easy as well.

I'm really nervous about moving to kdp.


message 32: by Steven (new)

Steven Nedeau | 28 comments Anita wrote: "Right now, Amazon now has two options for the print book, upload through Createspace (CS) or use KDP. The scuttlebutt is that KDP will be taking over the print side of the books from CS. KDP has a ..."

How did your experiment go? Were there any hiccups with kdp paperback taking over from createspace?


message 33: by S.A. (new)

S.A. Battaglia (sabattaglia) | 5 comments Lori-Ann wrote: "S.A. wrote: "The part about being registered as a traditional publisher caught my eye. What does that entail? How would one go about registering correctly? I've not yet published a novel, but am do..."

Lori-Ann,

Thank you so much for taking the time to write this thoughtful response. It helps clarify and gives me direction. I appreciate it. I'll be looking into these items, particularly IngramSpark and Nielson Book Scan.

Sincerely,

S.A.


message 34: by Lori-Ann (last edited Jun 08, 2018 07:21PM) (new)

Lori-Ann Claude | 76 comments S.A. wrote: "Thank you so much for taking the time to write this thoughtful response. It helps clarify and gives me direction. I appreciate it. I'll be looking into these items, particularly IngramSpark and Nielson Book Scan...."

You're welcome. I'm still learning... I think all of us learn something all the time.

I considered IngramSpark when I couldn't order a proof of my print book from KDP (I'm a Canadian author). What held me back from completing the account set up (payment/tax) was the set up fee per book. Right now, I don't have enough readers who would buy my first book in print to be worth the yearly expense. IS did email me with a "special" to wave the fee set up for my first book but it really is Amazon that has the biggest market (check out the Author Earnings website for awesome info about market shares) so for now, I'm not going to set up my book with IS.

As for using KDP, it's very easy. The limitations about KDP aren't really about the steps to format/upload a book. I only have a couple of annoyances:

1) The cover template I was given based on number of pages, trim size, etc... was off by a few pixels from the width perspective. So there is a slight difference between the cover template that I downloaded (I used the .png template which I uploaded to GIMP) and what it actually uses during the cover validation process (but that was for me and may not happen on the next book).

2) The other issue I found is that it warned that one of my images has too low a resolution. I just don't get it because I have another image in the book and I took the same steps to include both images and both are 300dpi or more. One has the warning the other doesn't.

The types of errors I had to fix were about "non printable" characters and those seemed to be about links. So expect some learning curve (I expect CS has similar warnings).

The process itself for KDP is easy enough. It's the lack of author proofs in Canada and the availability of the .ca marketplace which is a bummer.


message 35: by Jenna (new)

Jenna Thatcher (jenna_thatcher) | 132 comments Steven wrote: "Jenna wrote: "So on a whole, would you say kdp is finally at the level of createspace at this point, or not yet?"

I've been using createspace and watching kdp. The createspace system of setting up..."


Same, Steven, because createspace WAS easy once I figured it out. But to have my books all in one place and be able to see the pb copies sold, etc...? That would be nice. Hopefully the transition goes smoothly. :)


message 36: by Lynda (new)

Lynda Filler | 2 comments Lori-Ann wrote: "S.A. wrote: "Thank you so much for taking the time to write this thoughtful response. It helps clarify and gives me direction. I appreciate it. I'll be looking into these items, particularly Ingram..."

I had the same problem with the cover template and my designer couldn't understand what the problem was because it was fine in Create Space. Hopefully they will get enough complaints to work on that issues.


message 37: by Samantha (new)

Samantha Ball | 1 comments I have also been very happy with the way my book has turned out with Createspace. I am thinking about moving my files to KDP, so that I can utilise the Amazon pay per click marketing technique. Unfortunately, it seems than you cannot use this marketing tool with a paperback book on Createspace.


message 38: by Scott (last edited Jun 12, 2018 08:06PM) (new)

Scott Prill | 13 comments I may be wrong about this - but based on my recent experience with CreateSpace, Amazon for the most part expired CreateSpace on April 20th. This is sad as I found CreateSpace to be very useful in putting a book together and the CreateSpace staff were generally very helpful. I don't know what other alternatives that are out there to help Indie authors prepare books.


message 39: by Zana (new)

Zana Hart (zanahart) | 13 comments Scott, I hope you are wrong! Since April 20, I did 5 books via CS and they came through okay.


message 40: by Ken (new)

Ken (kendoyle) | 364 comments Scott wrote: "I may be wrong about this - but based on my recent experience with CreateSpace, Amazon for the most part expired CreateSpace on April 20th. This is sad as I found CreateSpace to be very useful in p..."
Amazon shut down the Createspace online store, which only affects authors who sold books directly on Createspace. I don't think I know anyone who bought a book directly from Createspace. You can still buy author copies from them.

The rest of Createspace is still very much alive. The question, though, is for how long.


message 41: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) | 787 comments Ken wrote: "Scott wrote: "I may be wrong about this - but based on my recent experience with CreateSpace, Amazon for the most part expired CreateSpace on April 20th. This is sad as I found CreateSpace to be ve..."

I heard before the Christmas season which would be bad on their part but again I only heard it. Eventually, they will phase out and get rid of CS and KDP will be the place to publish both ebooks and paperback. Is it a good idea? I mean I don't see an issue but there's nothing wrong with Createspace. If anything, Amazon just wants total control and having CS as a separate source and site makes it slightly difficult I guess.


message 42: by Scott (new)

Scott Prill | 13 comments CreateSapce really helped me put together both of my books before publishing them on Amazon. I had several conversations with CreateSpace personnel in the first quarter of 2018 about the coming shutdown and they said they would be looking for other jobs by April 20. Yet again, I don't fully understand the relationship between CreateSpace, KDP and Amazon.


message 43: by Eileen (new)

Eileen Iciek | 135 comments Scott wrote: "CreateSapce really helped me put together both of my books before publishing them on Amazon. I had several conversations with CreateSpace personnel in the first quarter of 2018 about the coming shu..."

Why April 20th? This year? I published my book on Create Space on April 25th.


message 44: by Scott (new)

Scott Prill | 13 comments Yes, it was April 20th of this year. CreateSpace was finishing up its services by that date. In fact they were no longer taking in new work after a March 2018 date. One could get a refund for work paid for but not finished by that time. Perhaps CreateSpace changed its mind or time frame - but CreateSpace was clear to me that April 20th was an end date. As I noted earlier, I do not understand the relationship between CreateSpace, KDP and Amazon so I may have their service responsibilities a bit confused.


message 45: by Christina (new)

Christina McMullen (cmcmullen) Scott wrote: "Yes, it was April 20th of this year. CreateSpace was finishing up its services by that date. In fact they were no longer taking in new work after a March 2018 date. One could get a refund for work ..."

I published a book through Createspace in May. I'd had the project started right before the 20th of April, so I would think if they weren't going to be around, they might have given me a heads up. Createspace still exists as of today. You can add new titles, create a new account, and basically do everything you could have done before. Perhaps, as Ken suggests above, you are thinking of the Createspace storefront, which was simply a retail outlet that is no longer available. That's been gone for a while and might have closed on April 20th of last year.


message 46: by K.C. (new)

K.C. Knouse (kcknouse) | 49 comments I had a work in progress prior to April 20, 2018, and had paid CreateSpace to obtain an LCCN for me. Part of the service was to send a completed copy to the Library of Congress. I received a notice from CreateSpace indicating that they would be discontinuing all PAID services on April 20, 2018. I understood that to mean the LCCN service, editorial services, cover design services etc. CreateSpace did not indicate anywhere in the notice that they would be shutting down. I published my book early in April and CreateSpace sent a copy of my book to the Library of Congress thereby fulfilling their commitment to me.

However, I am concerned that with the advent of KDP paperback services, CreateSpace, as it exists now, may eventually disappear.


message 47: by Lynda (new)

Lynda Filler | 2 comments As a comment, I recently published a title that was on CS in KDP as a test. They are shipping paperbacks. I should order a copy but I haven't yet. However, when I took a close look last night, the whole process in KDP is easier and cleaner than in CS. And I have published with CS since my first poetry book in 2009. They seem to be getting better at everything in that area. And it doesn't make business sense to have CS if they can do it easily through K\DP.


message 48: by J.D. (new)

J.D. Cunegan (jdcunegan) | 240 comments My only concern, RE: paperbacks through KDP, is that right now, by publishing my paperbacks through CreateSpace, I can have my paperbacks sold on websites like B&N (not the brick-and-mortar store, but the website). Not that I sell a bunch that way, but it's cool to see my book listed there. If I go through KDP, what incentive would Amazon have to list my paperback on any site that's not Amazon? I bailed from KU to get away from exclusivity.


message 49: by Wanjiru (new)

Wanjiru Warama (wanjiruwarama) | 204 comments Does Kdp require fully formatted ms to pub a paperback? Or can one post a pdf?


message 50: by Anna (new)

Anna Faversham (annafaversham) | 544 comments I have just put two books into paperback through KDP. At first I thought it would be easier to use one of their guided templates - nightmare but once I switched to the plain template, it was plain sailing! I enjoyed doing it and the results have been good.


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