Ultimate Popsugar Reading Challenge discussion

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2018 Weekly Checkins > week 13: 3/22 - 3/29

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message 1: by Nadine in NY (last edited Mar 29, 2018 04:06AM) (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6298 comments Mod
Happy Thursday! It's still cold here in NY, but yesterday it was almost 50 in the afternoon, I can hear the robins singing, and the earliest crocuses are up (again) now that the snow had finally receded (again).

I'm a little bit frazzled this morning because I woke up to the smoke alarm going off. I've checked the house, everything is fine, I don't know why the alarm was set off, and the only way to turn it off was to PERMANENTLY turn it off. So. I guess I need a new smoke alarm. I can't shake the worry that the alarm knows something I don't, and I've missed the fire.


Admin stuff:

In a few days it will be April! New month brings a new monthly read. April's category is "a book that involves a bookstore or library," the book chosen is Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore, and Tara has volunteered to lead the discussion.

If anyone would like to be a discussion leader for July (The The Woman in Cabin 10), August (The Night Circus), and September (Hamilton: The Revolution), just let me or Sara know.




This week I finished four books, none of them for the Challenge:

Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions into Adulthood by Lisa Damour - I have two daughters so I thought this might be a good fit for me, but ... meh. I didn't really learn anything that I didn't already know. If anything, this book made me nervous rather than reassured me, because every chapter ends with "if this is happening, seek therapy!" ... because the author is a therapist.

Superwoman, Volume 1: Who Killed Superwoman? (Phil Jimenez) - another of the DC Rebirth titles, and this one was fantastic! I feel like maybe I posted about this last week, but I'm too frazzled to check right now.

Ancillary Mercy by Ann Leckie - book 3 in the Radch series - I have loved everything I've read from Ann Leckie, and this was no exception. This book is kind of slow, and it got mixed reviews on GR because of that, but it worked for me. It's slow AND compelling!

Murder Must Advertise by Dorothy L. Sayers - every year I try to read a handful of books from the 1001 list, and this was one of them, and I hated it. I'm never reading another book by Sayers, if I can help it.




Question of the Week

This week's question is from AF: Have you ever looked at a book on Goodreads, or other website, and accidentally found out the ending of a book? Or some key information to the plot? Did you finish the book or keep reading?


Yes, this has happened to me a few times, mostly in the "old days" before most Goodreaders figured out spoiler tags. I always keep reading, in the hopes that the reveal was not actually a key plot point. It's disappointing, but I guess it's never ruined a book completely for me.


No reveal will ever be as bad as the time Roger Ebert spoiled the big plot twist of the movie The Crying Game.


message 2: by Jess (last edited Mar 29, 2018 05:28AM) (new)

Jess Penhallow | 427 comments Happy Thursday and Happy Holy Week. I stated a new job this week and it has been really interesting but I'm looking forward to my Easter 4 days weekend.

I finished two books this week taking my tally to 15/40:

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince for the WW Book Club. I'm glad this one is over with because it is my least favourite in the series due to the abundance of annoying teen romance. Looking forward to getting started on Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows which is more my jam! This will fulfil the prompt for female author using a male pseudonym (whether you count J.K as a pseudonym or the fact she uses Robert Galbraith in other books it still works)

The Time of My Life was my biggest surprise of the year. I'm not usually one for 'chick lit' but this book charmed me off my feet! This is for the song lyrics prompt (cue Dirty Dancing lift).

I am currently reading The Defenceless, after reading The Hummingbird in January I decided I wanted more Anna Fekte. So far I feel this is a step up from the previous book. I would really recommend this series to anyone struggling with the Nordic Noir prompt as it's not too gory or violent but still lots of intrigue.

QOTW

I have got quite good at avoiding spoilers for books as my book social media is contained to Goodreads and booktube both of which have a community that are good at avoiding giving spoilers.

I am currently watching a booktuber read the Harry Potter series for the first time and I am really impressed that she has avoided spoilers for so long.

Spoilers for Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban in case anyone else has managed this feat:

(view spoiler)

I am much worse with TV shows and films which get spoilt for me all the time especially reality tv type shows where the media doesn't seem to understand that people watch things on catch up now. I don't think I have not been spoiled of the Ru Paul's Drag Race Winner since about series 4!


message 3: by Margaret (last edited Mar 29, 2018 05:32AM) (new)

Margaret (igem36) Different weather every day this week: snow on Sunday, cold and windy Monday (planted my spring garden), rain Tuesday, sunny and warm yesterday (opened all the windows), and today looks cloudy and grim.

I finished The Cat Who Saw Red by Lilian Jackson Braun for #21 (favorite color) and Sailing with Senta - Across Coral Seas by Pierre Van Rooyen and Faith Van Rooyen for #25 (set at sea). Eleven of 40 for the challenge.

I'm starting Walden by Henry David Thoreau today. I was going to use this for "ugly cover", but (as usual with classics) my cover doesn't show up on Goodreads, so I might fit it in elsewhere.

Good luck with your smoke detector, Nadine! That must have been very unnerving.

QOTW: I've never *accidentally* come across a spoiler, but I frequently seek them out. There are often books I don't want to take the time to read, but I'm curious about what happens in the end, so I'll deliberately read Goodreads or Amazon reviews, hoping someone has written about the essential spoiler. And so far, someone always has!


message 4: by Anne (new)

Anne Happy Thursday! 22 of 50 down.

Completed:
Steve Allen’s Murder In Hawaii is a fun, frothy look at filming a Hawaii 5-0 style program on the island of Oahu. Steve and his wife, Jayne Meadows, are the amateur sleuths. It’s the 9th in his series. He’s roughly 77 when the book came out and Jayne is 80 – the book is written in a manner that lends them toward being at least 15 years younger – snorkeling, motor cycle rides, horseback stunts…. That said, I’ve read far worse things!

#13: book that is also a stage play or musical with A Room with a View by EM Forester. The first half, in Florence, is wonderful. The second half, in England, I found dry and anti-climactic. Maybe I was colored by my love of Florence…. I recall the movie being better.

#8 Book with a time of day in the title: Elvis in the Morning by William F Buckley, Jr. It’s a bizarre read. Buckley’s protagonist is so not what you would expect and so darned unlikeable, it brings down the quality of what is actually a strong Elvis biography.

Currently reading:
Tell No One by Harlen Coben for a different challenge.
Hush Now, Don't You Cry by Rhys Bowen for a different challenge, although it could work for song lyrics.

QOTW : Spoilers
Sometimes, I actively look for spoilers. If I am struggling with a book, I’ll see if there are any spoilers posted and actually read them, to see if I want to continue! If I am accidentally spoiled, I still keep reading. Well, I read anything that doesn’t involve the death of a dog.


message 5: by Brooke (new)

Brooke | 273 comments Hi everyone! I’ve had a good reading week because I’ve been at my company’s corporate office all week for the first time in 6 months. I work from home, so having to get up early and actually wear business clothes all week was quite a switch. LOL But the commute from the hotel to the office and evenings spent in a hotel room allow for a lot of time for reading.

I finished 4 books this week, but none of them are for Popsugar, so I’m still at 19/50 for this challenge.

Books I finished:
I Can't Make This Up: Life Lessons by Kevin Hart. I was really surprised at how much I enjoyed this. I didn’t expect much because based on what I’ve seen about Hart to date in interviews, movies, etc I thought he was a bit over the top. However, this memoir is really insightful, heartwarming and full of wisdom he learned over the years. A pleasant surprise.

Force of Nature by Jane Harper. I liked this. It is structured like The Dry, with chapters alternating between the present day investigation of the disappearance and the actual story of what happened in the past. I was pulled into the story from the very first page.

The Secrets She Keeps by Michael Robotham. I was absolutely sucked into this one from the beginning. It is told in alternating POV, with both women keeping secrets that are slowly revealed. A couple of the plot twists made me roll my eyes, but overall it was worth the read.

Bloodsucking Fiends by Christopher Moore. This was funny, although definitely not Moore's best. He can write witty banter and silly dialogue like few others, and sometimes that is just what I need.

I am currently reading:
Red Rising by Pierce Brown for a book set on another planet (27). I took a break with this one due to library holds that came up, but picked it back up again this week.
Beartown by Fredrik Backman for a book about sports (19). This is so good! I should finish this one tomorrow.

QOTW: I try to avoid book spoilers as much as possible, which is weird because I love television spoilers. It is nice that Goodreads allows spoilers to be hidden, but unfortunately sometimes a review will still say something that spoils a big plot point. And sometimes a review can lead me to figure out a major plot twist or book ending simply by the way it is written, even if it doesn't specifically point it out.


message 6: by Karen (new)

Karen | 127 comments Happy Thursday! Our snow from last weekend is melting and my daffodils are visible again. I'm very ready for spring!

This week I finished the emerald mile for the microhistory prompt. This book has both a poetic beauty in it's descriptions of the Colorado River and it's history, and a great plot as it follows management at a dam at risk of breaking and a group of river guides who decide to take the opportunity of a flood stage river to do a speed run through the cannon. Great action, and all so interesting. This has been one of my favorite reads this year, and I highly recommend it.

I also finished Anna Karenina, which was mentioned in I am Malala, for the book mentioned in another book prompt. Ruby Red was a quick read, which I'll use for the song lyrics in title prompt.

I'm currently reading Cutting for Stone for the twins prompt, the Art Forger from Reece Witherspoon's book club for book club prompt, and Sapphire Blue for favorite color prompt.

QOTW: I haven't had any unexpected spoilers on Goodreads.


message 7: by Tania (last edited Mar 29, 2018 05:46AM) (new)

Tania | 542 comments Stay safe - the fire alarm incident would freak me out too.

I'm now at 26/50 for the challenge.

This week I finished:
Three Tales Of My Father's Dragon by Ruth Stiles Gannett - a cute children's book that might work for a children's classic I've never read before, but I'm not using it there for now because I didn't find it on any children's classics lists, read for another challenge

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson - this was my Nordic noir, and doubled for the Book Riot genre fiction in translation prompt as well, I ended up liking it but I was doubtful in the beginning

I'm now reading a non-fiction book for another challenge, and a western for BR.

QOTW: I actively avoid spoilers, and I'm pretty good at it, but occasionally it happens. I really dislike spoilers, and usually it's someone I know who is responsible for me finding something out, it's a big pet peeve for me. In that sense I'm probably lucky I don't know too many people with the same reading tastes as me IRL. :-)


message 8: by Christine (last edited Mar 29, 2018 05:59AM) (new)

Christine McCann | 488 comments Hi everyone! Getting ready for our family trip to Austin. We all need a little R&R, so we're excited!

(I'm also excited for all the books I got for the trip!

Finished this week
Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI for true crime. SO good. True crime is not normally my thing, but now I'm thinking *historical* true crime might be an exception. I'm going to check out The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America and The Man from the Train: The Solving of a Century-Old Serial Killer Mystery now!

Started this week

Burnt Offerings - I started it in 2015 actually and stalled out. But this is good for *A book set in the decade you were born*

The Wet Nurse's Tale - for *A book by a local author*

The Disaster Artist: My Life Inside The Room, the Greatest Bad Movie Ever Made - for *A book about a villain or antihero* - I decided I needed something silly and fluffy for a change of pace, and this is fascinating and hilarious. Surely Tommy Wiseau qualifies as an anti-hero, right?

On deck for vacation:
Dawn
Stalking Jack the Ripper


QOTW:

I hate even knowing there will be a twist, because then I can't relax and enjoy the story - I just keep trying to spot the GOTCHA. This happened with one of the books I read over the last year, where the person who introduced me to it also said, "And man, that last page!" and I was VERY PUT OUT.

Luckily the book was still good, and it didn't have some lame latter-day Shyamalan BS at the end. But I was afraid that it would, the whole time I was reading!


message 9: by Kenya (new)

Kenya Starflight | 657 comments Good morning all! (Or whatever time it is in your neck of the woods...)

Finished three books this week:

Altered Carbon -- for the "cyberpunk" prompt. Between this one and "Neuromancer," I'm starting to think that the cyberpunk genre isn't for me, despite my love of sci-fi. What is it about cyberpunk books that they feel they have to make their characters utter sociopaths?

War Horse -- for the "book that's also a play or musical" prompt. A little blandly written, but still a heartwrenching account of World War I told through the eyes of a horse. I wish I could see the play at some point -- I hear it's phenomenal.

The Circus Fire: A True Story of an American Tragedy -- not for the challenge. Boy howdy, this book was heartbreaking. It's an account of the 1944 Hartford Circus Fire, and reading about such a tragedy wrung me out.

Currently reading:

Heartless -- "next book in a series you're reading" (Parasol Protectorate).

Napalm & Silly Putty -- "bestseller from the year you graduated high school."

QOTW:

It's happened to me a time or two. Sometimes I'm actively looking for spoilers because I have no intention of reading a book, other times it's by accident. I accidentally spoiled the HUGE twist in Justine Larbalestier's Liar for myself by poking around too much on TV Tropes -- I had no intention of reading it anyhow, but (view spoiler)

Also, not from a website, but my sister blurted out the ending to The Scarlet Letter and spoiled it for me when we were both in high school. I nearly beat the tar out of her for that. (I had to finish reading that one anyhow because it was a school assignment...)


message 10: by Heather (new)

Heather (heatherbowman) | 720 comments Happy Thursday! It was a slow reading week for me, but that's not necessarily a bad thing. I'm almost done with my photo boxes for last year and it's been great (and emotional) reliving memories.

Finished
Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore (a book involving a library or bookstore) - I didn't love this book, but I didn't hate it either.

Reading
To Kill a Mockingbird - I put this down for awhile because I'd read too many heavy books in a row, but I picked it up again last night and fell right back into the story.

QOTW
I hate spoilers! The worst that ever happened to me was because of a title page verso, of all places. I was in library school and looking at Library of Congress subject headings and call numbers for my cataloging class. One of the subject headings for Never Let Me Go is (view spoiler). I was so angry! I finished reading the book anyway, and it's one of my favorites, but I felt disappointed that the revelation, which I think was supposed to dawn on the reader slowly, was shoved in my face like that. I still hold a grudge against LC. They're spoiling the book in library catalogs everywhere!!


message 11: by Ellie (last edited Mar 29, 2018 06:10AM) (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1182 comments The dog was sick at the weekend and the start of BST always puts me out of kilter (I'm fine when the clocks go back, it's just losing an hour really affects me). I am a creature of routine. Though one hour lost really doesn't explain how I didn't finish any books this week.

I'm still reading The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue and Lost Mars: The Golden Age of the Red Planet but I'm looking forward to my 4 day weekend! I don't have anything planned so hopefully I can spend it reading (and eating).

QOTW:
I've seen a few spoilers on social media over the years. I try not to read reviews of books I know I want to read until after I've read the books. I really don't like spoilers so if I stumble across one I'll not read the book for a very long time in the hope I will forget The Thing.

Some people just think that if you don't watch/read something immediately that you don't care. Not everyone is in the position to read/watch straight away, and you should still be able to enjoy cultural things even if they are not brand new. I've seen people talking to teens and spoiling a classic at the same time as recommending it...when there was a really good chance they could have read it fresh. Argh! :)


message 12: by Johanna (new)

Johanna Ellwood (jpellwood) | 233 comments Looks like it is going to be close to 80 today in central Virginia.
Dare I say that maybe spring has FINALLY arrived?

I didn't finish any books this week, but I do have a fun story. A boy in our Boy Scout Troop built a Free Little Library for his Eagle project. We were clearing out books and decided to bring some to put in there. I am happy to report that it was full - I mean busting at the seams. I added our couple of books and then found The Time Traveler's Wife in there - in mint condition! I had already downloaded it, but now I have my own copy in hand!


On my nightstand:
The Night Circus. I am just about finished with this book. I am undecided as to how I feel about it. I'll let you all know next week. Still have to finish The Purple Swamp Hen and other Stories. And of course The Time Traveler's Wife.


QOTW: Don't hate on me, but I am one of those people who will read the last page of a book when I am partway through, especially if the anticipation is killing me. Now in all fairness, that doesn't necessarily inform me of the big finale. So I probably don't want to know how it ends, especially if there's a twist. I do like to read those as they happen.


message 13: by Jess (new)

Jess Penhallow | 427 comments I've just remembered something else I wanted to ask about spoilers. Is it possible to spoil historical events?

I am thinking particularly of a hilarious time when my boyfriend spoilt the battle of Waterloo for my friend. He was reading a book about Napoleon and they were discussing him. My friend grew up in South Africa and genuinely didn't know who won. He was quite annoyed to find out the ending.

I had a similar experience with The Accursed Kings Series Books 1-3: The Iron King, The Strangled Queen, The Poisoned Crown by Maurice Druon. The series is great but kind assumes that you know all the events before reading it so the author interjects and spoils future events throughout. The title of the second book is a spoiler in itself! I am not well versed in the history of medieval France so found these 'spoilers' quite annoying.


message 14: by Johanna (new)

Johanna Ellwood (jpellwood) | 233 comments Kenya wrote: "Good morning all! (Or whatever time it is in your neck of the woods...)

Finished three books this week:

Altered Carbon -- for the "cyberpunk" prompt. Between this one and "Neuromance..."


My dad grew up in Hartford. He was invited to go to the circus that day with some friends, but said he was too lazy and turned them down! Good thing. It was heartbreaking. People in my parents' generation still talk about it.


Raquel (Silver Valkyrie Reads) | 895 comments Nadine, I have to ask what it was you disliked so much about the Dorothy Sayers book. I LOVED mysteries when I was a teenager, and Lord Peter Wimsey was up there in my favorites with Sherlock Holmes and a lot of Agatha Christie books. That said I don't remember liking Murder Must Advertise nearly as much as, say, Clouds of Witness or some of the others. (It seems inevitable that 'classics' lists put my least favorite books by an author as the must reads... not sure why.)

Finished:
(Several short stories and novellas this week that went along with series' I'm reading, so I wasn't quite as prolific in my reading as it looks at first glance.)

The Princess Companion: A Retelling of The Princess and the Pea My first reaction was that the author's writing wasn't as good in this earlier series as in her later series that I accidentally read first, but the book really grew on me as I read it. (Fills the fruit or vegetable prompt.)

Logan A novella in the Life After series. It was kind of fun that the author took advantage of the e-book format to include video commentary at the end of each chapter and a Spotify playlist that went along with the book.

The Kitchen Maid This was a free 'bonus content' story that felt like it should have just been a prologue to the story it went with (The Princess Fugitive: A Reimagining of Little Red Riding Hood).

Dominion For reasons I won't try to explain, one line in this book broke my suspension of disbelief for the whole story. Disappointing, because otherwise I think I would have really liked some of what she did in this series wrap-up. (This would work for the published in 2018 prompt, or the death and grief prompt, but I've already filled both of those.)

You're Never Weird on the Internet I listened to this on audio, and really enjoyed it. If you're enough of a nerd to know who Felicia Day is, and especially if you also have any creative aspirations, I highly recommend her memoir. (It just occurred to me that this would work for the 'mental health' prompt as well, if I hadn't already filled it.)

The Princess Fugitive: A Reimagining of Little Red Riding Hood This book was a little frustrating because it could have been really different take on a fairy tale retelling, if the author had fully stuck to her own premise. Still enjoyable, but it was so close to amazing, and really fell short.

The Princess Companion chapters 8 and 9 Maxs perspective More bonus content, but this one was a lot of fun to read.

Happily Ever Afters: A Reimagining of Snow White and Rose Red I really enjoyed half of this story (about Evelyn) and the other half (about Sarah) was kind of meh.

Currently Reading:

Enchanters' End Game I picked this one back up for a print book (to read in the bathtub--I have a strict 'no Kindle in the tub' rule). It's really enjoyable, I just keep putting it off to get the most of my Kindle Unlimited trial. (The trial is ending Saturday midnight, but my husband has Friday off, so I'm taking advantage of the three day weekend to fit in as much reading as possible before it ends. :-) )

Shot All to Hell: Bad Ass Outlaws, Gunfighters, and Law Men of the Old West Picked this up because it randomly looked interesting, was on KU, and was nonfiction, and I needed a bit of a break from my YA fantasy streak. I guess I'll use it for true crime.

The Richest Man in Babylon My current audio book, because a friend recommended it. So far it seems like a really good book that's telling me things I already know in a simple format. Not sure how much I'll really enjoy it, but I may recommend it others.

The Princess Pact: A Twist on Rumpelstiltskin I was a little skeptical, because Rumpelstiltskin is one of my least favorite fairy tales, but the author comes at it from a completely different angle than normal, so I think I'm going to enjoy it.

QOTW:
I normally avoid the long reviews, because those are the ones by people who seem to confuse reviews with book reports, and tend more toward spoilers. I know I've had the experience of getting minor spoilers from reviews, but never in a situation where I cared too much (like, I was leaning against reading the book anyway).

I have occasionally had friends spoil books for me in the process of trying to convince me to read them, and in the one case I can think of, I never did read the book because it seemed so pointless once I knew the twist.

Sometimes I wish there was a way to get just certain kinds of spoilers so I could avoid or know about specific content. Like, I won't avoid a book just because it has infertility in it, but I want to know going in that it's going to be an emotional roller coaster for me.


message 16: by Tara (new)

Tara Bates | 1008 comments It’s cold but starting to get better here. I didn’t finish anything this week because I’m alternating between 5 books I have to finish.

QOTW: I’m sure I have but I don’t really get the whole “spoilers” thing. Unless it’s a really crazy twist (like sixth sense) where it changes the way that you read it, I don’t care. I figure that if (for example) a character dying ruins the book without context then it’s not a great book. There’s still all the stuff that happens around it and leading up to it.
I actually a couple days ago wanted to check that I had the right edition on Goodreads so went to check the number of pages and saw the sentence “—- was found guilty of murder” so there’s that lol oops


message 17: by Carol (last edited Mar 29, 2018 06:49AM) (new)

Carol Roote | 116 comments Hello All,

Finished:

I Know This Much Is True for #28 A book with song lyrics in the title. Last week, I said that I was part way through and hated the main character, but I ended up LOVING this book. Now I want to read all of Wally Lamb's other books. In addition to #28, this book would work for so many prompts for this challenge:
#6 A novel based on a read person; this novel is loosely based on the author's own life
#9 A book about a villain or antihero; the main character was such a bully!
#10 A book about death or grief; no spoilers but this prompt would work for a whole host of reasons
#15 A book about feminism; the atrocious treatment of women in the past is a theme that runs throughout the book
#16 A book about mental health; one of the twins has schizophrenia
#30 A book with characters who are twins; the main character and narrator is an identical twin with his schizophrenic brother
#32 A book from a celebrity book club; 1998 Oprah book club pick
#36 A book set in the decade you were born if you were born in the 60's like me or if you were born in the 90's.
#40 Your favorite prompt from the 2015, 2016, or 2017 POPSUGAR Reading Challenges; 2015 A book with more than 500 pages; 2016 A book set in your home state if you live in Connecticut or A book with a protagonist who has your occupation if you teach or paint houses; 2017 A book that is a story within a story (long story :) ) or A book set in two different time periods
Advanced #10 A book recommended by someone taking the POPSUGAR reading challenge--I highly recommend this book!

Currently Reading:

The Invention of Wings #6 A novel based on a real person. This book is loosely based on the life of Sarah Moore Grimke https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarah_M...

QOTW:

Yes, I've accidentally seen spoilers on Goodreads or other sites. I always finish the book, though, if I'm enjoying it.

Occasionally, I look up spoilers on purpose to see if a character I really like is going to die. I still keep reading, but I want to know ahead of time, rather than being blindsided. I did this with the Hunger Games series by Suzanne Collins, the Divergent series by Veronica Roth, Paper Towns, The Fault in Our Stars, Looking for Alaska, and Me Before You. I'm not going to tell you what I found out, because I don't want to give spoilers if you don't want them.


Raquel (Silver Valkyrie Reads) | 895 comments Tara wrote: "QOTW: I’m sure I have but I don’t really get the whole “spoilers” thing. Unless it’s a really crazy twist (like sixth sense) where it changes the way that you read it, I don’t care. I figure that if (for example) a character dying ruins the book without context then it’s not a great book. There’s still all the stuff that happens around it and leading up to it."

I have this theory that in general Myers Briggs S (sensing, concrete details, practical) people care less about spoilers than N (intuitive, abstract, dreamers) people. It may not be true in the population at large, but amongst the people I know, S's can kind of take individual moments at face value and enjoy them regardless of context, but for N's EVERYTHING is connected and affects how they look at everything else in the story, so even a minor spoiler is like spoiling a plot twist for everyone else.

(My husband and I are both N's, and most of his siblings are S's. SO hard to keep them from spoiling movies and things, because they can't figure out why we care. My husband doesn't even watch movie trailers if he already knows he wants to see the movie, because they usually spoil parts of the story for him.)


message 19: by Yvonne (new)

Yvonne | 40 comments Hey everyone. I haven't posted here for the past 3 weeks because I have been in a bit of a reading slump and hadn't really read much for the challenge. However, I am now catching up and I have managed to read 6 books, 4 of which were for the PopSugar challenge.

Finished:
The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt - a book about feminism
A nonfiction (meaning slow read for me) about a queen in Ancient Egypt who did what no woman had ever done before and crowned herself Pharaoh of all Egypt. Even though it was a nonfiction and slow read, I really enjoyed it. I have been obsessed with ancient Egypt for most of my life and loved the "behind the scenes" look at one of the most fascinating women in history.

Obsidio - the next book in a series you have already started
This was one of my most anticipated books this year. I have read the first two books in the series (Illuminae and Gemina) multiple times and I could not wait to see how the story played out. I can't not say that I was disappointed. I read it in 1 day and absolutely could not put it down. I was literally walking around my house with my nose in the book and making my family laugh at me.

In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex - a book set at sea
Again, a nonfiction book (WHY am I doing this to myself) but I still really enjoyed it. It was a fascinating story that really proves the old saying that "the truth is often stranger than fiction".

Stillhouse Lake - a book by a local author
Another book I could not put down. I was drawn to this book because I spend a lot of time with my family during the summer at a local lake called Stillhouse Lake, and then I found out the author lives in the Dallas Fort Worth area which is only about 3 hours away from me...so SCORE. Its about a woman who has to figure out how to go on with life and raising her kids after finding out her husband is a serial killer and she was accused of being his accomplice. I haven't really read a thriller in a long while and it was a breath of fresh air after a couple of really slow nonfiction.

Progress:
11/42 regular challenge
2/10 advanced challenge

Current/Upcoming Reads:
All Our Wrong Todays - a book about time travel
American War - a book by an author of a different ethnicity than you
The Librarian of Auschwitz - a book that involves a bookstore or library OR a book based on a real person

QotW:
I have never really been spoiled through GoodReads, but I have a really bad habit of spoiling myself, especially with thrillers. My bad habit is that I will start a book, read about the first chapter or two and then go to the back to see how many pages and how many chapters the books has. In that look, I tend to pick up a word or two here and there and names really jump out at me. I still read the book just because I like to know how the characters get from point A to point B, but a lot of the time I have a good idea of "who done it".


message 20: by Lauren (last edited Mar 29, 2018 07:10AM) (new)

Lauren Oertel | 753 comments This week I read Running with Scissors for a book club. I read it years ago, and could only remember a few weird details... most of the group had a hard time with the awful stuff going on in the book. The only thing that took place in that house that was cute was the "bible dipping." ;) It's interesting to read about the lawsuits that came after it though - makes you wonder how much of it didn't actually happen.

I finished The Power of Moments: Why Certain Experiences Have Extraordinary Impact which was excellent! I feel like there are a lot of practical applications in here, and I enjoyed the overall idea. I recommend this one, for people who enjoy this genre.

I listened to Black Like Me for a different book club and found it to be pretty frustrating. I know that this was back in the early '60s, but the author who did this experiment to show how bad racism was in the South, was also pretty racist. The whole premise is annoying - that we can't understand how bad it is to be Black in the U.S. until a white person experiences it. Maybe try listening to Black people? Oh well, it's a fairly interesting story at least.

I also finished listening to The Big Leap: Conquer Your Hidden Fear and Take Life to the Next Level. I found the main idea to be really applicable to my life right now (as I'm trying to take the big leap into a career change that's much less financially secure, but extremely fulfilling), but I'm finding that I already can't remember the suggestions on taking action.

Right now I'm listening to My Brilliant Friend, about to start on Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future on my kindle, and I'm still getting through the really dense Witnessing Whiteness: First Steps Toward an Antiracist Practice and Culture.

QOTW: I actually can't think of any books that were ruined for me by spoilers. I do remember hearing/reading about someone who would always read the end of the book first, so they knew what was coming, and I thought that was a terrible idea, haha.


message 21: by SarahKat (new)

SarahKat | 163 comments It was in the 70's yesterday. This morning I woke up to snow on the ground. It will probably melt by this afternoon. Maybe.

I actually got a few books accomplished this week!

The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden for Animal in the title. Really enjoyed this one.
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle for a childhood classic I've never read. Read it aloud to my kid. Neither of us really care for it.
Heir of Fire by Sarah J. Maas not for a challenge.
Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo for involving a heist.

Working On:
Voyager by Diana Gabaldon - Country that fascinates me, or possibly LGBT depending on how involved that character will be through the rest of the book
The Blind Assassinby Margaret Atwood for feminism?
The Titan's Curse by Rick Riordan on audio with my kid. Not for the challenge
The Slippery Slope by Lemony Snicket - aloud to son, not for the challenge
The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America by Erik Larson on audio for true crime

QOTW:
I don't remember ever spoiling anything huge for myself. I have accidentally seen a few little things here and there, but nothing that I even remember.

The one time the end of a book was spoiled for me was when I had just started reading the Divergent series and my friend said "I didn't like the last book. (view spoiler)" I still read it all and finished it and enjoyed it. I like reading the journey even if I know where it will end up.


message 22: by Jo (last edited Mar 29, 2018 07:16AM) (new)

Jo | 17 comments Happy Thursday from Philadelphia! The weather is starting to warm up here too. The snow from our 4th Nor'easter is melting, finally! March has been a good month for me. I've finished 3 books and I'm working on a fourth.
So far I've finished A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson. This was for a favorite prompt from a previous challenge (2017-A book involving travel). I really enjoyed reading about some of his misadventures along the Appalachian Trail along with some of its' history as well.
The second book was Lost Lake by Sarah Addison Allen. I like her work and this was a quick read for the book with alliteration in the title.
Third is We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche. It is the book form of a TED talk she gave. I liked what she had to say and I'd like to read some of her other books now. I used this for the prompt a problem facing society today.
I'm currently reading Bad Feminist by Roxanne Gay for my book about feminism.

QOTW: I had the plot of Gone Girl spoiled for me just yesterday. And yes, I should have read it by now.


message 23: by Sara (new)

Sara | 1508 comments Raquel wrote: "I have this theory that in general Myers Briggs S (sensing, concrete details, practical) people care less about spoilers than N (intuitive, abstract, dreamers) people. It may not be true in the population at large, but amongst the people I know, S's can kind of take individual moments at face value and enjoy them regardless of context, but for N's EVERYTHING is connected and affects how they look at everything else in the story, so even a minor spoiler is like spoiling a plot twist for everyone else."

This is really interesting! I'm an N as well (INFJ) and hate having things spoiled! I never connected it to MBTI though :)


message 24: by Anne (new)

Anne (annefullercoxnet) | 202 comments Once again I have only read books for young people. The final list for my youth reading committee comes out on April 15 (I am getting a jump on it) and I hope by May 1 I am all done and can read the stack of books that is waiting for me. Don't get me wrong- I have found some real gems, but it is taken me forever to get through The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey.

This week I finished three books and several picture books. I finished:
Dirt which is a story about a girl trying to save a horse. Kiddos who like horses will like this book.
The Matchstick Castle which is a great read for kiddos, I just didn't like the blatant disregard of the parent's rules. The parents were over the top sticklers but they were very clear on the boundaries and the kids just lied to them through the whole book.
Hooper which is a good basketball book. I thought it was heavy going but I can see middle school ballers liking it.
The best picture book I read this week was Mae Among the Stars it is a "novel" based on a real person that is excellent if you are doing the challenge in picture books. It was a story about following your dreams without getting preachy and Mae Jemison is a great example of doing just that. I highly recommend this book.

QOTW: I have been able to avoid most spoilers, which is nice. That being said, I will read the last chapters of books that I am debating whether to continue. Sometimes I read on and sometimes I just say "not worth it."

Happy Reading this week!


message 25: by Sara (new)

Sara | 1508 comments Happy Thursday! I think we have finally turned the corner here in Virginia after one last snow over the weekend. It was about 70 yesterday and will be warmer today. I have a sick child at home today though and am just working a couple of short hours at work before heading back home to her.

Books finished:

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince - finished a reread on audio.

An American Marriage by Tayari Jones. Kind of related to last week's QOTW, I don't normally pick up the "it" books, but I decided to give this one a try. It was a good read, sad and bittersweet. It's a mixture of letters and standard narrative fiction. I enjoyed it. I'm using it for a book a stranger was reading in public, but it would work for a celebrity book club (Oprah), and probably a few others as well.

Beneath a Scarlet Sky by Mark T. Sullivan. Another audio read for me. I didn't love this as much as I expected to. I enjoyed reading an Italian perspective on WWII, but I felt the story (based on true events) got kinda jumbled at the end. I don't think it ever really explained the "twist" that was revealed towards the end of the book. Maybe that's because I was listening on audio and sometimes my mind has trouble processing audio as well as visual. Or maybe the historical information just doesn't provide a concrete answer. Either way I just didn't feel it. Using for a book with alliteration in the title.

Currently reading:

Still Alice by Lisa Genova. I'm about halfway and enjoying it so far. I'm using it for a book made into a movie I've already seen. It would also work for a book about mental health.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - finishing up my reread of the HP series.

I'm trying to settle on my next book. I have started a couple but I haven't really clicked into one yet.

Finished 14/50

QOTW

I am pretty good at avoiding spoilers. I see the warning signs when a discussion or review seems to be heading that way and I jump ship. I love what Raquel said about the Myers Brigg connection. I'm an INFJ and really feel the effect of a spoiler. I wonder if that's true for all "N" types. Anyone else who knows their type that can weigh in?


message 26: by Jen (new)

Jen (jentrewren) | 777 comments Lauren wrote: "This week I read Running with Scissors for a book club. I read it years ago, and could only remember a few weird details... most of the group had a hard time with the awful stuff goin..."

Hi Lauren,
I loved running with scissors when I read it but it is a bit confronting.
I also loved Black Like Me but had a different perspective when I started it. I was reading it thinking that perhaps people were not listening enough and that was why he did the experiment. Perhaps I gave him too much benefit of the doubt, and you are right it shouldn't have been necessary, but often people need to walk in someone else's shoes before they really understand. Being told something isn't the same as living it or even fake living it. I don't really understand how a black man would have felt living in the US at that time whoever tells me. I did spend most of my primary years with people running out of their houses looking at me and yelling palagi (in Tuvalu) or Te Imatang (in Kiribati) and pointing and laughing so am used to being out of culture.


message 27: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1182 comments Tara wrote: "QOTW: I’m sure I have but I don’t really get the whole “spoilers” thing. Unless it’s a really crazy twist (like sixth sense) where it changes the way that you read it, I don’t care. I figure that if (for example) a character dying ruins the book without context then it’s not a great book. There’s still all the stuff that happens around it and leading up to it.."

It changes how I read any book, if I know so and so is going to die I'm going to be expecting it at every page turn and I find it distracts me from getting immersed in everything else is going on. I want to be able to feel surprised or be able to work things out myself. I prefer to read a book knowing very little about it, that's just how my brain works.

Sure the book may well be worth reading even knowing the spoiler but (like the person who mentioned Never Let Me Go) it can make a huge difference in how you experience it. You can always re-read a book but you can't easily forget a spoiler once it's wormed its way in! ;)


message 28: by Ann (new)

Ann | 83 comments Hi all,

Vancouver looks a bit dreary today, but that's typical in the spring :)

I am at 7/40 and 3/10.

I finished The Zookeeper's Wife, for a book you borrowed from someone. I enjoyed it, but mostly for the historical part. It really got me that this was a true story during WWII. Crazy! And FYI, I heard the movie is tough to watch, since they kill many animals at the zoo.

I am currently reading The Old Man and the Sea, for the book set at sea. Again, in my life - very, very far behind on reading the classics! LOL. This is short, so I should be done soon. On to the next!!!

QOTW: I have been so lucky on here. I think I've only seen one spoiler? And I have not read that title yet, so I can't confirm it. This happened while I was researching about our prompt "A book about twins"!!!


message 29: by Megan (new)

Megan (mghrt06) | 540 comments Another busy day at work this morning :(

Officially DNF'd Bad Feminist.

Finished The Wedding Date. Very cute. Using for published in 2018.

Started Little Fires Everywhere for celebrity book club. I better get moving on reading this because its due back in a few days!!!! So far at 25% in I'm not blown away yet.

9 Regular, 1 Advanced, 4 non-challenge books.


message 30: by Jen (new)

Jen (jentrewren) | 777 comments This week has been another crazy week. As soon as the cyclone clean up was completed from the 17th we started this week with a 6.6 earthquake which freaked a few people out while I slept right through it. Was woken the next night by a green tree frog jumping on my head as pay back. However my lovely year 10 girls made me lunch in home ec today as they know I often don't have time to eat at school. Gorgeous girls.
My new house (just finished being built and waiting on fencing so I can move in) has now survived a cyclone and an earthquake before I have even moved in. I guess I now know it is solidly built and the builders gave me a bottle of Moet to celebrate, bonus.

A slow reading week again as I only finished 2 books and 1 was a 30 minute fun read on Saturday.
How to Tell If Your Cat Is Plotting to Kill You by Matthew Inman, The Oatmeal which I saw a few people on here had read and looked fun so I got a copy and did enjoy it. https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...
19. A book about or involving a sport Charlie Veron- A Life Underwater
I meant to read this a few weeks ago but since he is one of my idols I kept postponing in case it didn't measure up. If you love diving or marine bio (or both like me) it should be a must read.
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

QOTW
I generally don't see spoilers anywhere as I am only part of goodreads and they are easy to avoid here. I am an S type so would still read it anyway if I had wanted to in the first place. I do usually spot the twists before they happen in most books anyway so spoilers wouldn't generally make much difference other than I would know my guess was correct before I should.


message 31: by Ashley (new)

Ashley | 159 comments Good Morning,

It's been a slow few weeks for me reading wise (sorry watching too much Peaky Blinders after work).

Finished:

The Last Black Unicorn for a book by an author of a different ethnicity than you. I listened to it on audio and loved that Tiffany read it. I always enjoy hearing the author's story straight from the horses mouth.

Currently Reading:

The Woman in the Window for a book that's published in 2018. I'm half way through and really like it. It really shouldn't be taking me this long to read it but distractions...

Too Fat, Too Slutty, Too Loud: The Rise and Reign of the Unruly Woman for a book about feminism. Since this is set-up in essay form, I'm taking my time with it and reading a bit during lunch every day.

QOTW:

I don't think I've ever been spoiled by Goodreads for a book I was reading/going to read. I honestly don't mind spoilers for the most part. If it takes me a long time to get to a movie, TV show or book, I'll be okay with a spoiler. But it a movie/show/book just came out and you are posting a spoiler the day of release in a public forum you are a horrible person and I hate you (yes I'm talking to the guy that spoiler The Force Awakens for me the day it was released!).


message 32: by Naina (last edited Mar 29, 2018 07:52AM) (new)

Naina (naynay55) | 113 comments Hi from a currently-nippy DC that will hopefully warm up as the day continues!

Finished
- My Dead Parents: A Memoir - book about death or grief. The last third of the book really picks up as the author travels to Ukraine to unravel and investigate the facts around the car accident that took her father's life.

- Swimming Between Worlds - book about a country that fascinates you -- part of the book takes place in Nigeria. I received an ARC of the book from First to Read, and I really enjoyed this book. It takes place in the late 1950s/early 1960s in North Carolina during the civil rights movement and is thought-provoking and insightful. The last few chapters had me reeling and I wish the author had told the story from at least one more perspective -- there are three main characters and two voices get to be narrators. I think the third would have added tremendously. Nonetheless, a really good read.

- Her Every Fear - book about mental health. I received a copy of this book through a Goodreads Giveaway, and finally picked it up on Tuesday and devoured it in the past two days. I could not put it down! The main character suffers from anxiety and panic attacks, as well as slight agoraphobia.

So that puts me at 17/52 , with 14/42 and 3/10.

Currently Reading
- The Pisces - does not fit into a prompt, unless any of you can think of one! (And I've already read a book for the published in 2018 prompt.) I received an ARC of this book as well through First to Read and am less than 1/4 into it so far. The premise is interesting and the book is starting to pick up some speed. Not sure how I feel about it so far, and it has mixed reviews on Goodreads.

QOTW
I'm an ENTJ and I love spoilers, particularly for some movies and tv shows, less though for books. However, if there's a lot of hoopla over a book and I don't think I'll read it for some time, I'll read spoilers to figure out what all the hype is about.


message 33: by Carmen (new)

Carmen (TheReadingTrashQueen) (thereadingtrashqueen) | 908 comments Jess wrote: "I've just remembered something else I wanted to ask about spoilers. Is it possible to spoil historical events?"

I'd say yes. It's a tricky thing of course, as it's history, but just look at how many people will get angry when someone 'spoils' The Crown? And I was really angry when my mom unintentionally spoiled the end of Waco for me (I was watching the TV series, had never even heard of it before, and I asked her if she knew about it. She immediately said: (view spoiler)

So yes, if someone is reading/watching something about a particular historical event, or any kind of history, I'd say someone can definitely spoil the reader/watcher.


message 34: by Carmen (new)

Carmen (TheReadingTrashQueen) (thereadingtrashqueen) | 908 comments Raquel wrote: "Sometimes I wish there was a way to get just certain kinds of spoilers so I could avoid or know about specific content. Like, I won't avoid a book just because it has infertility in it, but I want to know going in that it's going to be an emotional roller coaster for me. "

This is why I love the fanfiction tagging system on AO3, provided that the authors use it properly. Yes, it spoils in some cases, but it makes sure no one (who reads the tags) gets into someone only to be triggered. I just finished a book and while it does spoil some events, I fully intend to put some trigger warnings in my review (with plenty of warning).


message 35: by Kristel (last edited Mar 29, 2018 08:23AM) (new)

Kristel (kristelmedinamd) | 49 comments Hi everyone! I hope you all had a very nice week and wish you a nice long weekend! I will be working actually, but that's ok, I already have my mind wrapped around the idea, sigh!

So this week I finished 3 books.
The Heart Forger by Rin Chupeco, not for this challenge, but because I am trying to keep up with the series I started. This is the second book in the Bone Witch series, and it was soooo good. Better than the first one. Loved it!! This I'd recommend for the fantasy lovers, looking for a well built magical world.
We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. This one I used for the book about feminism. It was simple and to the point. A must-read for everyone.
The Power by Naomi Alderman. I chose this for the prompt a book about a problem facing society today. This book was about a dystopian world where women develop some sort of superpowers where they can inflict pain and even kill people and that is how they pretty much gain control over the society after much conflict and violence. I really enjoyed this book, although I know it has some mixed reviews. It certainly made me think.

15/50

QOTW: Thankfully I have not experienced this. At least I haven't found out anything that made me abandon a book.


message 36: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6298 comments Mod
Raquel wrote: "Nadine, I have to ask what it was you disliked so much about the Dorothy Sayers book. I LOVED mysteries when I was a teenager, and Lord Peter Wimsey was up there in my favorites with Sherlock Holme..."

I love mysteries too! Agatha Christie and Arthur Conan Doyle are both fine. But Sayers was excessively wordy, which is like a cardinal sin for me, I really really hate extra words, and in this case it felt like filler to distract the reader. She was also grossly supercilious (almost offensively so), and obsessed with making her Point about Advertising. She clearly had an ax to grind, but not my ax, I wasn't interested. And on top of all that, the mystery was transparent, I guessed "whodunnit" immediately - and I NEVER figure out mysteries!


message 37: by Carmen (new)

Carmen (TheReadingTrashQueen) (thereadingtrashqueen) | 908 comments Greetings from a currently sunny Netherlands! The weather's been all over the place, but I hope that going into April it will finally settle down.

The past week was a slow week for me, but it makes sense. I had a birthday, slept for most of two days, had to work, an appointment.. but I still managed to finish one book, 1,5 comics, and almost 100k of a fanfic haha! I also read a book about making treats to hand out, but I barely count it as a book because it's just telling you how to make them. I just wish that my book (that took me too long to read ha) counted for the challenge xD

Read
Jouw perfecte jaar (Your Perfect Year)- nonchallenge. This hasn't been translated into English (yet) which is a real shame because I really enjoyed it. I didn't like the female main character (and her best friend) as much as I liked the male main character, but I think that might be because I recognized too much of myself in her thought patterns. The book changes POV every chapter, between those two, and it kept you wanting to read on to find out what happened to the other next. It was a cozy read, with an ending you could smell from a mile away (especially with the library's label on the spine), but I didn't mind. Besides, it ended up not like you would have expected anyways! The book did have some things I would have liked to be warned about (view spoiler), so I'll make sure to mention that in my review of it once I get to it.

Currently reading
The Crown: The inside history - I have decided I am going to count it towards a microhistory after all. It's the story of one family, over the course of 7 years. I think that counts for micro, because the definition really confuses me and I honestly am beyond caring at this point, oops.

QOTW
Countless times, to be honest. But that's because even small things count as spoilers to me, or I can read between the lines and see the spoiler anyways, especially in terms of books. I still continue to read the book, though, but it might take me a long time to get to said book if I hadn't started it already. For example, a friend of mine spoiled Me Before You, because she figured everyone knew. Safe to say I didn't. That particular kind of spoiler happens to me all the time, and it really annoys me.

The worst one was when reading (or well, starting) Hamlet. My copy was an edition with some stuff before the actual play. Guess what spoiled the ending of the play? Note that this part, talking about the play, was in the book before the play itself. The same thing happened with Animal Farm, but once I realized I immediately skipped it. Which is hard for me, because I have to read things in order. I just don't get it. Can't we all just stop assuming everyone has read the classics/major things? (I am very passionate about this ha)

Someone also mentioned The Zookeeper's Wife, and I saw the movie and loved it, but yeah, those animals were the toughest to watch. I was in so much pain! I do really want to read the book, though, and visit the zoo itself. It really impacted me.


message 38: by Ian (last edited Mar 29, 2018 08:35AM) (new)

Ian (iansreads) This week I have only finished one book (13/50):

Artemis by Andy Weir - I used this to fulfill the book "A Book Involving a Heist," although it could also be used to fulfill the prompt "A Book Set on Another Planet," "A Book about a Villain or Antihero," or "A Past Goodreads Choice Award Winner." This is the sophomore novel from the author of The Martian, but I did not find this read to be nearly as compelling.

I am currently reading:

The Cuckoo's Calling by Robert Galbraith - This will be used for the prompt "A Book by a Female Author Using a Male Pseudonym" as Robert Galbraith is a pseudonym used by J.K. Rowling. So far I've found this book could also be used for: "A Book Set in a Country that Fascinates You," "A Book about Death or Grief," "A Book with Alliteration in the Title," or "A Book with an Animal in the Title." So far I am really liking this one. I am looking forward to jumping into the rest of the books in this series that are out so far.

Question of the Week -

Q: Have you ever looked at a book on Goodreads, or other website, and accidentally found out the ending of a book? Or some key information to the plot? Did you finish the book or keep reading?
A: First off, I am new to using the site, so this is not a huge issue for me. Also, I have such an extensive TBR for myself that I do not really go browsing for reads on Goodreads and really only use the site to review a book after I have read it.


message 39: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) | 242 comments Good morning!

Kind of a slow reading week for me, mostly because I had to finish a long book I was not enjoying for my book club, and so I didn't do much reading. Finally finished it, whew.

A Gentleman in Moscow (celebrity book club) - I loved the clever, witty writing but got tired of it eventually. I also thought the tone did not match the story, since it was a lighthearted tone but war and famine and terror were happening outside. But I finished it!

Shakespeare's Wife (anti-hero) - I am definitely enjoying this one, but just not quite done yet.

The Lost Book of Moses: The Quest for the World's Oldest Bible--and the Man Who Wrote It (local author) - Only about 15% done (thanks for the calculations, Kindle!), but I like it so far. Historical sleuthing is always fun. :)

Women Who Become Men: Albanian Sworn Virgins (no prompt for this, so I may reach back to a favorite prompt from past years (women or feminism, something like that) to include it) - Absolutely amazing, and terrifying to see how women were treated. Fascinating book.

Question of the Week
I don't like spoilers, but I usually don't get terribly upset by them either. I do have a pet peeve though, which is when publishers reveal something significant to sell the book. Aaarrgghhh... An author should be able to tell a story in their own way. When I recommended We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves to my book club, I told them NOT to look at the book cover because it reveals something you don't find out until well into the book, and it matters that you don't know because it's a challenge to the assumptions you had while reading.


message 40: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6298 comments Mod
Raquel wrote: " I have this theory that in general Myers Briggs S (sensing, concrete details, practical) people care less about spoilers than N (intuitive, abstract, dreamers) people. It may not be true in the population at large, but amongst the people I know, S's can kind of take individual moments at face value and enjoy them regardless of context, but for N's EVERYTHING is connected and affects how they look at everything else in the ...."

That's a very interesting theory. I'm INTJ and I hate spoilers, they really spoil the experience for me, like deflating a balloon and all I'm left with is flaccid latex.


message 41: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6298 comments Mod
SarahKat wrote: "... one time the end of a book was spoiled for me was when I had just started reading the Divergent ..."

Yikes! That's a pretty big spoiler!! Why would anyone say something like that???


message 42: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) | 242 comments Nadine wrote: "Murder Must Advertise by Dorothy L. Sayers - every year I try to read a handful of books from the 1001 list, and this was one of them, and I hated it. I'm never reading another book by Sayers, if I can help it...."

Some of Sayers attitudes do not fare well in today's world, and that bothers me when I read her. I never enjoyed the Lord Peter Wimsey books except for the four with Harriet Vane (Strong Poison, Have His Carcase, Gaudy Night, Busman's Honeymoon), with Gaudy Night my favorite - though you have to read them in order. They are a very restrained, intellectualized kind of romance, with passion bubbling beneath the surface, and I think they are really good. I have reread all of them, though I couldn't make myself read all her Wimsey-without-Vane books even once. So if you ever decide to give Sayers another try, head for Strong Poison.


message 43: by Jess (new)

Jess Penhallow | 427 comments Cheri wrote: "Good morning!

Kind of a slow reading week for me, mostly because I had to finish a long book I was not enjoying for my book club, and so I didn't do much reading. Finally finished it, whew.

[book..."


Wow, I've just had a look at the cover and I can't believe they would include that! I read this book on kindle so luckily I didn't spend long dwelling on the cover and was surprised when the important revelation came.


message 44: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6298 comments Mod
Ashley wrote: "... a movie/show/book just came out and you are posting a spoiler the day of release in a public forum you are a horrible person and I hate you (yes I'm talking to the guy that spoiler The Force Awakens for me the day it was released!).

..."



I'm hating that person too!!! I was lucky to see that on opening weekend. I would have been so angry if I knew anything beforehand.


message 45: by Rachelnyc (new)

Rachelnyc | 186 comments Hi everyone. I finished 3 books this week but only one for the challenge. I'm currently at 26/50.

A Man Called Ove(book recommended by someone taking the challenge) is a delightful novel about a curmudgeonly loner whose life gets upended by his friendly neighbors. It's predictable in a lot of ways but still an enjoyable read.

You is a disturbing thriller told from the perspective of the stalker. Very creepy and crass but I liked seeing things from the alternative viewpoint than is usual of this type of book.

Finally, I read Bonfire by Krysten Ritter. I am a big fan of her acting work and I thought this was a solid debut novel. I figured out the bulk of the mystery early on which is always disappointing but it was an interesting story nonetheless.

Currently reading The Broken Girls

QOTW: I absolutely hate being spoiled on any media. I am pretty careful about avoiding them but I have had a few minor spoilers from reading reviews. Use spoiler tags people! ;)


message 46: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) | 242 comments Jess wrote: "Wow, I've just had a look at the cover and I can't believe they would include that! ..."

I know!!! Pretty outrageous!


message 47: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1182 comments Cheri wrote: "Good morning!

Kind of a slow reading week for me, mostly because I had to finish a long book I was not enjoying for my book club, and so I didn't do much reading. Finally finished it, whew.

[book..."


When book club picked We Are All Conpletely Beside Ourselves apparently the recommender spoiled it when describing it, and I am so glad I missed that meeting! The UK cover is similar but they changed that element so not obvious. That is definitely a book that needs you not to know certain things.


message 48: by Kenya (new)

Kenya Starflight | 657 comments Johanna wrote: My dad grew up in Hartford. He was invited to go to the circus that day with some friends, but said he was too lazy and turned them down! Good thing. It was heartbreaking. People in my parents' generation still talk about it.

Oh wow... I'm glad your father missed out on that! The sad thing is, as Stewart O'Nan pointed out in the book, the circus fire has been largely forgotten outside of Connecticut. People don't realize how much it affected a generation -- much like Columbine or 9/11 affected my own generation...


message 49: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6298 comments Mod
Carmen wrote: "... The worst one was when reading (or well, starting) Hamlet. My copy was an edition with some stuff before the actual play. Guess what spoiled the ending of the play? Note that this part, talking about the play, was in the book before the play itself. ..."

Arghhhh!!! Introductions to classics are The Worst!!! I've learned the hard way: do not read the introduction first!!


message 50: by Fannie (new)

Fannie D'Ascola | 418 comments Bonjour,

Almost spring here. Today I am wearing rain boots instead of snow ones (is it the right terms?).

I finished three books this week, two toward the challenge:

Coraline for the movie I already seen. Sometimes I don't like Gaiman, and sometimes I do. This was one I liked. Creepy but very good.

Gut: The Inside Story of Our Body’s Most Underrated Organ for the microhistory. Very interesting but I didn't love it, just liked it okay.

And not for the challenge:

Le Goût du Chlore Didn't like that one. I wanted to read it because I loves Polina from the same author but it wasn't good for me.

Iam now reading Pride and Prejudice just because I love it and want to read it again.

QOTW: My husband usually read to me the last sentence from the book I am reading because he likes to prove that this is never a spoiler. Big mistake one time. I won't tell which book, but the last sentence was something like that: ''It was true, Main Character was really dead''.


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