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The Miscellaneous Club > April 2018: Outer Space

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message 1: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2320 comments Mod
April 14 is Look up at the Sky Day, and April 28 is International Astronomy Day. So in April, we will read books about outer space, such as galaxies, stars, planets, comets, asteroids, etc. Fiction or non-fiction.


message 3: by QNPoohBear (last edited Mar 29, 2018 07:03PM) (new)

QNPoohBear | 1471 comments American Girl's theme this year is space. "Girl of the Year 2018" Luciana wants to be the first girl on Mars. Her books revolve around space camp astronaut training.
Luciana fits the theme the best so far but the third book isn't out yet.

My nieces are into space. I'll get some book recommendations from them.

James Marshall


message 4: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2320 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "American Girl's theme this year is space. "Girl of the Year 2018" Luciana wants to be the first girl on Mars. Her books revolve around space camp astronaut training.
Luciana fits th..."


Thanks for the information!


message 5: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (last edited Apr 10, 2018 10:57AM) (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6244 comments Mod
13 Planets: The Latest View of the Solar System is beautiful. I've read a fair bit on the subject recently, so I didn't bother to read all the text. But the fragments that I did were interesting. Some added clarity where my understanding was fuzzy, but others only confused me further. This is the kind of book kids into factoids, trivia, and the EyeWitness books will love. It's not a narrative, and it's not for tots.

I do like that the book acknowledges that science is not hard facts, as my husband and I, and many of you, I imagine, learned int schools. There's always more to learn, refinements to be added to theories, deeper understandings, sometimes even revolutions in thought.

I don't rate books I don't read through, but I'm guessing this would be a 3-4 star book for me.


message 6: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6244 comments Mod
I also skimmed Team Moon: How 400,000 People Landed Apollo 11 on the Moon. I'm confident I'd give it four stars, though, as it's so rich, with great concept, awesome pictures, rich narrative, lots of quotations and informative captions, and a plentitude of various appendices. Definitely recommended to any reader interested in the subject.


message 7: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2320 comments Mod
Thanks for your thoughts on these 2 books, Cheryl!
I gave 13 Planets 4 stars and Team Moon 5 stars.


message 8: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7184 comments Mod
Although this is a simple and fantastical picture book, I absolutely love Enchanted Lions.

A sweetly poetic, gorgeously illustrated, imaginative and fantastical romp through the nighttime constellations astride a magical lion, David T. Greenberg's Enchanted Lions is a wonderful bedtime story for any young child, but is especially suitable for children who are interested in outer space, the constellations, the vastness and mystery of the universe. Rose and her lion companion glide through the universe, past Pegasus, past Pisces, even engaging in a race across the vastness of space with Monoceros, the unicorn (and Rose even becomes somewhat of a heroine, rescuing herself and the enchanted lion when they come too close to a black hole, by hooking a comet tail lasso over Cetus the whale). Kristina Swarner's accompanying illustrations are also absolutely gorgeous, luminous and bright, a perfect complement to the author's poetic narrative, creating a rich and fantastical tapestry sure to enchant and delight (a wondrous marriage of text and image).

That all being said, Enchanted Lions is not a book for those looking for factual information about outer space and the universe (it is a completely fantastical, imaginative voyage into the unknown of the universe, a poetical delight that is part fairy-tale, part science fiction fantasy). Highly recommended for imaginative children (and basically anyone who has ever dreamed of encountering the constellations, anyone who has ever imagined and wished for the nighttime constellations to be real, to actually be able to meet and touch Cetus the whale, Pegasus the horse, Pisces the fishes). A delightful and richly creative small gem!


message 9: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2320 comments Mod
Manybooks wrote: "Although this is a simple and fantastical picture book, I absolutely love Enchanted Lions.

A sweetly poetic, gorgeously illustrated, imaginative and fantastical romp through the nig..."


Sounds like a great book! I checked our library's catalog, and alas! it is not there! I may have to ILL the book, but it sounds lovely.


message 10: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7184 comments Mod
Beverly wrote: "Manybooks wrote: "Although this is a simple and fantastical picture book, I absolutely love Enchanted Lions.

A sweetly poetic, gorgeously illustrated, imaginative and fantastical ro..."


I really really liked this book and the illustrations are grand.


message 11: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1471 comments Enchanted Lions sounds good for older niece to read to her little brother. The nearest library says "stock transfer" whatever that means. I'll have to request it from another library in the system for next time I see the kids. Younger niece, 7, wanted to know where the universe came from. She would prefer a more scientific book.


message 12: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7184 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "Enchanted Lions sounds good for older niece to read to her little brother. The nearest library says "stock transfer" whatever that means. I'll have to request it from another library in the system ..."

This is definitely not a scientific book, but so much fun.


message 13: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7184 comments Mod
The Solar System

Although the information presented by author Emily Bone in her The Solar System is indeed and definitely informative, scientifically sound, accompanied by both photographs and some at times even quite imaginative illustrations, and is actually also textually featured in a for the most part engaging enough manner (which is most important, as so very often, totally non fiction child-friendly introductions to topics like the solar system etc. often really do tend to suffer from too much information shown monotonously and tediously), I am also left somewhat majorly disappointed with parts of The Solar System.

For while the author does in brief but generally meticulous detail describe the origins of the solar system, the sun, the moon, the planets (including briefly mentioning the fact that Pluto is at present no longer considered one of the nine planets but has been designated as a dwarf planetoid), Emily Bone also does not really ever go that one but for me necessary step further, such as mentioning that the incredible hell-like surface temperature of Venus is due to the so-called greenhouse effect gone totally awry, that our moon likely formed when a large Mars-sized planet crashed into the infant earth and that Mars probably also once had a much thicker atmosphere than it has now and might therefore also have once harboured primitive life forms (and that there are actually surface structures on Mars that some experts do in fact consider as being possible fossils). And really, the details, the information I have found to be lacking or at least not sufficiently expanded upon (and there are in fact considerably more such informational holes and gaps present in The Solar System than the ones I have shown as my examples), all these are in my humble opinion truly and surely massively important and necessary nuggets of scientific knowledge and theory, and even if Emily Bone wants to keep the main body of her text as simple as possible, she really should be mentioning additional information (such as Venus's greenhouse effect positive feedback loop and Mars perhaps once having had liquid Water and even life) as footnotes, endnotes and the like.

But all that having been said, The Solar System is still a pretty good basic introduction for older children above the age of eight or so (not spectacular, in my opinion kind of missing a bit, but it does give a decent enough overview), but I for one cannot give more than a two star ranking at best (as while I do consider the general make-up, organisation and text of The Solar System as a high three star book, that there is just a quick suggestion for visiting external websites for further study and research is to and for me not the same as there also being included a bibliographical list of books to consult for further study and research).


message 14: by Manybooks (last edited Apr 16, 2018 03:21PM) (new)

Manybooks | 7184 comments Mod
Comets, Stars, the Moon, and Mars: Space Poems and Paintings

Now perhaps I am missing something with regard to Douglas Florian's illustrations because I am reading Comets, Stars, the Moon, and Mars: Space Poems and Paintings as a Kindle download. For although I do kind of and to a certain point enjoy Florian's artwork, I have not in any way been all that much "wowed" by it, as especially in the e-book format, the vastness and majesty of outer space is not at least to and for me all that successfully indicated by Douglas Florian's often rather overly busy and intricate pictures (which also appear more than a bit unclear and washed out on my Ipad). And frankly, truly, I for one would have much preferred either photographs or more realistic paintings, since the author/illustrator's aptly named space poems do in my opinion not really mesh all that successfully and all that well with the accompanying visual images, as while the latter are generally fantastical and imaginative, the former, the space poems themselves, while indeed lyrical, rhythmic and rhyming are still for all intents and purposes totally non fictional and scientific in scope.

But truth be told, I have also not really enjoyed Douglas Florian's verses all that much either, as there are at least for me on a potential reading pleasure level only a select few poems that truly show and present an adequate and delightful, readable combination of lyricism and fact, with much of the rhyming unfortunately feeling rather artificial, pedestrian and forced to my ears and eyes (and honestly, I would have much preferred the text of Comets, Stars, the Moon, and Mars: Space Poems and Paintings to have been presented in prose and not in poetry, for so many of the author's verses, while certainly showing and presenting the wonders of the solar system and beyond, just read and flow rather too awkwardly with regard to rhyming sequences, rhythm and even vocabulary choices). Two and a half stars for Comets, Stars, the Moon and Mars: Space Poems and Paintings, but rounded down to two stars, as while I do in fact much appreciate Douglas Florian's included glossary and his suggestions for further reading (which most decidedly have been my favourite parts of the book), both the presented space poems and the accompnaying illustrations really have not been all that much to my personal liking and tastes.


message 15: by Manybooks (last edited Apr 21, 2018 08:50AM) (new)

Manybooks | 7184 comments Mod
I have to admit that I do find it kind of annoying that for ALL of the National Geographic Kids Readers I have read recently, although they are all entirely non-fictional, NONE of them provide ANY bibliographical lists and suggestions for further reading (neither books nor even websites children and/or parents, teachers could consult for further research and study), a huge and to and for me major shortcoming. And thus, while I have indeed found Elizabeth Carney's Mars interesting and full of seemingly well researched detail, the lack of citations and no bibliography (combined with the rather lame punny riddles) has made me only consider Mars at best a three star read (and once I get to actually posting a review, I will likely even consider only two stars).


message 16: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7184 comments Mod
Planets

I guess that NONE of the National Geographic Kids Readers seem to include bibliographies, citations and suggestions for further reading, and while this massively bothers me in and of itself, with Elizabeth Carney's Planets, the shortcomings of not featuring such supplemental information and research possibilities really have hit home for me so to speak.

For while Planets does indeed present a decently organised and informational introduction to the solar system, to our sun and the planets, because Planets is obviously geared to and has been conceptualised for recently independent child readers, it is thus by nature and plain necessity rather simplistic and sparse in detail and description (definitely understandable, however I do rather fault the author for not mentioning that Pluto used to be considered one of the planets and that its status of now being considered a dwarf planet is a relatively recent phenomenon).

And yes indeed (and in my humble opinion) because the factual information on the Sun, on Mercury, Venus, the Earth, Mars etc. is so lacking in detail (by the necessity of author Elizabeth Carney wanting to and also needing to keep her textual content, her printed words easily accessible to and for recently independent readers), supplemental, more detailed information that is not part of the text proper (including bibliographical information, including suggestions for further study and research) should really be a given, should be an absolutely required, necessary addition (as there will likely be both children and parents who might well desire more content, who want more details, more information and the lack of websites, of possible books where this might be found, where this might be looked up in Planets, this really does sadly limit the book's potential teaching and learning value, especially with regard to easy and quick supplemental study and research).

Two and a half stars for Planets (and while I have indeed found this book a generally readable, and above all a well organised introduction to the solar system, to the planets for young readers, the combination of a lack of any and all bibliographical lists, a complete absence of suggestions for further study and knowledge expansion alongside of those silly, lame and yes indeed noticeably repetitive riddles and puns is enough for me to once again only consider a two star ranking at best, although I do in fact and actually consider Planets as a decent enough introduction, but with definite and personally frustrating, annoying limitations).


message 17: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7184 comments Mod
I agree with Beverly, that Mission to Pluto: The First Visit to an Ice Dwarf and the Kuiper Belt is excellent, simply wonderful both textually and visually.

Finally (and after a number of frustrating and annoying recent outer space themed personal reading experiences), Mary Kay Carson's Mission to Pluto: The First Visit to an Ice Dwarf and the Kuiper Belt is a non fiction astronomy book geared to children (older children above the age of eleven or so, as there is not only quite a bit of presented text but also by necessity of the subject matter, some subject-specific advanced vocabulary and jargon) which totally and utterly (in my humble opinion) gets it right, that successfully combines an interesting, informative, readable narrative with wonderful and expressive, informatively enlightening accompanying photographs (not to mention the amazing supplemental details, a detailed select bibliography, an index, as well as the necessary photo credits for those images not taken by photographer Tom Uhlman). And truly, Mission to Pluto: The First Visit to an Ice Dwarf and the Kuiper Belt is not just a solid and wonderful introduction to Pluto and to the Kuiper Belt, to the outer reaches of our solar system for older children. No indeed, it is also a perfect introduction for interested adult readers (especially if one desires a succinct but not too dragging, not too overly scientific analysis of the history of Pluto's discovery, of how it and to me still rather annoyingly was demoted from being the ninth planet of our solar system to now being considered but a dwarf planet, a planetoid, a so-called Ice Dwarf, of how the mission to Pluto came into being and to fruition etc.).

Highly highly recommended, and for and to me, Mission to Pluto: The Fist Visit to an Ice Dwarf and the Kuiper Belt is truly and indeed one of the best, one of the most informative and one of the most easily and readily understood basic astronomy-themed books on Pluto I have read to date, a glowingly perfect combination of Mary Kay Carson's informatively readable text and Tom Uhlman's visually stunning accompanying photographs (and with that I of course mean those images that have not come from NASA and Johns Hopkins University), and of course, for me personally, the detailed bibliographical information at the back of Mission to Pluto: The First Visit to an Ice Dwarf and the Kuiper Belt absolutely being the delicious but oh so very much necessary icing on an already most delicious cake.


message 18: by Manybooks (last edited Apr 22, 2018 09:08AM) (new)

Manybooks | 7184 comments Mod
I am also enjoying Mary Kay Carson's Exploring the Solar System: A History with 22 Activities. It is not perfect in my opinion, as I do think that she shies too much away from some of the more controversial details of the history of astronomy (I mean, she mentions that Galileo had issues with the Catholic Church, but does not go into nearly enough detail for me and also sadly does not mention that some of Galileo's contemporaries such as Giordano Bruno for example were actually killed, were basically murdered by the Church as supposed heretics, nor does she delve far enough into the arms race and that Wernher von Braun certainly escaped being held to task for his role in Nazi Germany's rocket production etc. because he got offered a very cushy post WWII job by the Americans), but what she does write is interesting and the accompanying activities are delightful and educational.


message 19: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (last edited Apr 28, 2018 01:56PM) (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2320 comments Mod
Mars Exploration Rovers: An Interactive Space Exploration Adventure by Steve Kortenkamp

I don't generally like "choose your own adventure" style books, because I am a linear thinker, and like to read from page to page, rather than skipping around here and there. Fortunately, it worked to just read this book page to page anyway, without it getting confusing. The book is written in the second person, with "you" being either a scientist or an engineer working on any one of a number of missions to Mars. Several different missions are described, mostly from the 1990s to the present day. Interesting facts about what has been discovered about Mars so far.


message 20: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7184 comments Mod
Beverly wrote: "Mars Exploration Rovers: An Interactive Space Exploration Adventure by Steve Kortenkamp

I don't generally like "choose your own adventure" style books, because I a..."


Although this sounds interesting, I think I will skip it, as I tend to not all that much like narratives written entirely in the second person.


message 21: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6244 comments Mod
Hm. I might try it, just because I'm insatiably curious. Thank you for letting us know about it!


message 22: by Manybooks (last edited Jun 17, 2018 10:27AM) (new)

Manybooks | 7184 comments Mod
Next Stop Neptune: Experiencing the Solar System (from 2004, so still lists Pluto as the ninth planet, but I absolutely loved this, if one takes into consideration that it is not current and up to date).

I (personally) most definitely have very much enjoyed Alvin Jenkins' Next Stop Neptune: Experiencing the Solar System (and just to point out, Alvin Jenkins is a former physics professor and the father of well-known children's author and illustrator Steve Jenkins, who in fact provides the accompanying illustrations here). And first and foremost, I do very much appreciate the clear, concise and exceedingly well organised factually astute, enlightening narrative (from the birth to the solar system to a detailed analysis of not only the nine planets but also how long it would take for a human driving a car at around the speed of 60 miles per hour to reach each of the planets, that it would take for example 50 years to reach our nearest neighbour, the planet Venus, 90 years to reach Mars, but that to reach the outer limits of the solar system, it would take thousands of years).

However, and yes indeed, because Next Stop Neptune: Experiencing the Solar System was published in 2004 and thus before the demotion of Pluto to dwarf planetoid status, the latter is of course still depicted and described as the ninth planet, something that I for one both appreciate and yes also very much love, as I am still rather majorly ticked off that Pluto was basically "killed" as a planet, and although it might now be considered scientifically in error, I personally will always consider Pluto as a true planet, especially since I have recently become aware of the fact that NOT EVERYONE is even in agreement with it no longer being considered a bona fide planet. But if you absolutely do want the most recently published, the most current information on the solar system, Next Stop Neptune: Experiencing the Solar System is by nature and necessity of its publication date obviously not this, is actually if truth be told, more than fourteen years out of date (something to consider, as for example, even with Pluto, Alvin Jenkins did in 2004 of course not yet know that there are in fact more than one moon orbiting it). Still, I for one do think that Next Stop Neptune: Experiencing the Solar System is a wonderfully enlightening introduction to our solar system, to the sun and its planets (and although I would have appreciated both photographs as well as Steve Jenkins' collage like illustrations, they do provide a visually stunning compliment to Alvin Jenkins', to his father's scientific but always engaging and interesting printed words).

Highly recommended (but definitely with the necessary caveat that both text and obviously also the very much appreciated listed bibliography will of course not contain any post 2004 information and details, something that must be taken into account but something that is also and always with regard to non fiction, the unavoidable nature of the academic and intellectual beast).


message 23: by Manybooks (last edited Jun 11, 2018 07:55AM) (new)

Manybooks | 7184 comments Mod
Born with a Bang: The Universe Tells Our Cosmic Story is scientifically sound but I certainly did not much enjoy the anthropomorphism, of having the universe like a human being narrate its story in the first person. Liked the informative back materials (including a well organised bibliography), loved the colourful and almost expressionistic accompanying illustrations but the writing style, the way Jennifer Morgan makes the universe into a talking, feeling sentient being really does not all that much work for me.


message 24: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2320 comments Mod
Manybooks wrote: "Next Stop Neptune: Experiencing the Solar System (from 2004, so still lists Pluto as the ninth planet, but I absolutely loved this, if one takes into consideration that it is not cur..."

I finally got a chance to read this one also. Yes, it was a bit dated, but the information was interesting, and Steve Jenkins' illustrations were terrific.


message 25: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2320 comments Mod
Exoplanets by Seymour Simon
Exoplanets by Seymour Simon

This is a new acquisition in our library system. A typical Simon, with words on one side of the page and a full-page illustration facing the text. There was interesting information about planets that astronomers have discovered orbiting around distant suns. There is a mix of illustrations and photos; with the illustrations being suitably outer spacey. An excellent introduction.


message 26: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6244 comments Mod
Ooh, adding to my list, ty!


message 27: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (last edited Aug 27, 2018 05:00PM) (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2320 comments Mod
Gail Gibbons has updated two of her picture book non-fiction books:
The Planets and Galaxies, Galaxies. Both were published in 2018.
The Planets by Gail Gibbons Galaxies, Galaxies by Gail Gibbons

"Planets" is suitable for about 2nd through 5th grade students. "Planets" mentions Pluto's demotion to dwarf planet, and gives a brief overview of each of the planets in our solar system.
"Galaxies" is best for 3rd through 5th grade students. The information covers the different galaxy types; gives info on the development of telescopes; and talks about the newest technologies for studying the universe.
Both books are heavily illustrated in Gibbons' signature style. They are both good science books for young students.


message 28: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6244 comments Mod
Oh that's good news! Now if libraries can just find budget for the updated editions.


message 29: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2320 comments Mod
The Mysterious Universe: Supernovae, Dark Energy, and Black Holes by Ellen Jackson
The Mysterious Universe Supernovae, Dark Energy, and Black Holes by Ellen Jackson

Although this book is 10 years old, it still has interesting information about the scientists who are studying supernovae and black holes.


message 30: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7184 comments Mod
The Moon

Seymour Simon's The Moon is for the most part an adequately standard general introduction to the earth's moon, although the book's 2003 publication date does unfortunately make the author's categorical claim that there is absolutely NO water present on the moon's surface factually false, seeing that frozen water, that quite large amounts of ice have indeed recently been detected and discovered as existing both on the moon's surface and especially in many lunar caves and caverns.

And yes, while The Moon would probably work well enough to basically introduce children (older children from about the ages of seven to ten years of age) to our earth's one and only satellite, frankly, I really have not been all that academically and intellectually impressed with The Moon, as aside from the now out of date information and details regarding the presence of water on the moon (or rather that the author claims there absolutely is none in any form whatsoever), even more problematic is that Seymour Simon also refrains from explaining and showing in detail how the moon's gravity affects the earth (how for example, the oceans' tides are caused by lunar gravity pulling on the earth), not to mention that while the Appollo Missions to the moon were and remain of the utmost importance (and essential), lunar exploration did not simply stop in 1972, did not cease with Apollo 17 (and while NASA astronauts might have been the only individuals to have so far set foot on the moon, scientists and space explorers from countries other than the USA have also studied and analysed the moon and just because they did not actually land and set foot on the moon, that does not mean their findings etc. are secondary or to be ignored as seems to have been the case here).

Therefore, and even though there is defintely much of interest included and presented in The Moon (and with especially the accompanying photographs being aesthetically brilliant and occasionally even spectacularly awesome), textually, thematically and content-wise, I really cannot consider more than a grudging two stars at best (as there are just too many annoying informational gaps and shortcomings, and indeed that Seymour Simon has also not bothered to include ANY secondary sources, any bibliographical information, period, that is not only massively frustrating, it also seriously limits the teaching, learning but especially the supplemental research potential of The Moon).


message 31: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1471 comments My 6-year-old nephew got this for his birthday
ABCs of Space by Chris Ferrie .

It looks like a baby board book but inside it's technical and scientific. I haven't looked at it in detail but his grandfather read some of it out loud to show the rest of us why he chose it. It was well beyond me but I'm sure my nephew loves it. If I get a chance to read it I will post a review.


message 32: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6244 comments Mod
That looks interesting; thanks for posting!


message 33: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7184 comments Mod
Although I really liked the poetry and picture combination of Once Upon a Star: A Poetic Journey Through Space, I did sometimes find James Carter's rhyming scheme a bit awkward in so far that there is both rhyming and blank verse included and it does at lest for me make the flow of the poetry a bit halting and distracting at times, although I still do recommend this book as a great introduction to outer space for the very young.


message 34: by Manybooks (last edited Nov 13, 2019 05:57AM) (new)

Manybooks | 7184 comments Mod
When Planet Earth Was New

Wow! James Gladstone does absolutely and without a doubt textually demonstrate in his When Planet Earth Was New that it is indeed more than possible to portray in a clear, concise and above all very much young child friendly manner the long and varied history of the earth (from our planet's birth billions of years ago, through aeons of both geologic and biologic evolution to now, to the present day, and yes this all without thankfully ever turning When Planet Earth Was New into some kind of cutesy semi-fictional account where the earth feels almost anthropomorphic, but just with hard-core scientific facts and details simply but informatively, educationally presented and explained). Accompanied by Katherine Diemert's colourfully bright and lively illustrations, with aesthetically delightful artwork that imaginatively yet always realistically mirrors and sometimes even visually expands on the author's, on James Gladstone's enlightening narrative (and with the inclusion of both a glossary and a bibliography listing both books and websites being very much a appreciated and desired added bonus), When Planet Earth Was New has definitely and absolutely been both a solid four star book for me and as such also most highly recommended.

And yes indeed, the only reason why I am not quite ready for a five star ranking for When Planet Earth Was New is that personally I do wish that James Gladstone had at least pointed out how humans have especially since the Industrial Revolution polluted and ravaged the earth and that while the earth is still much cooler and more inhabitable than it was during its infancy, human caused global warning is or at least should be seen as a dangerous global threat that even young children should be taught and made aware of (although I also do feel that I must leave the a bit grudging caveat that When Planet Earth Was New definitely portrays a highly scientific and therefore pro evolution point of view, something that I for one totally do laud and find very reassuring, but that of course parents who are staunch creationists would perhaps and even likely find the entire premise of James Gladstone's slow evolution through billions of years text anathema and unacceptable, even if I personally might well wish that they would take off their blinkesr and accept evolution as reality).


message 35: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2320 comments Mod
Manybooks wrote: "[even if I personally might well wish that they would take off their blinkers and accept evolution as reality..."

We are going to have to agree to disagree on this point. Those of us who believe in God and special creation believe it is the evolutionists that are wearing blinders.


message 36: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7184 comments Mod
Beverly wrote: "Manybooks wrote: "[even if I personally might well wish that they would take off their blinkers and accept evolution as reality..."

We are going to have to agree to disagree on this point. Those o..."


Actually, most total science people would probably disagree with me as well, as I happen to believe in theism, in evolution guided by God or a deity.


message 37: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1471 comments I absolutely loved Starcrossed Starcrossed by Julia Denos
Take a look at that gorgeous cover! It caught my eye on the library display shelf. This is a fictional tale about the constellation Eridanus, here represented by a girl, Eri, who loves studying space more than ANYTHING! Her best friend is Acmar, a boy constellation in the sky, based on a star in the constellation Eridanus, according to the author's note. Every night Eri calls out to Acmar and he answers back. She longs to know everything about being a star and space while he wants to know about daylight, feeling the earth under your feet and other things Eri knows. They're the best of friends. When a shooting star falls to earth, both make a wish, the same wish, in fact.

The story is sweet and interesting. I've never heard of this constellation before and presented in the form of a tale, it caught me attention and didn't let go. The illustrations are stunning! The girl is shown outside and in as Acmar is curious about blood and bones. Her bones are compared to the invisible lines she draws in her mind linking the stars in his constellation. The illustrations are done in nighttime space colors: dark blue, purple, pink, green and star white. Eri is so cute! Her obsession reminds me of oldest niece a few years ago when space was her main thing. Acmar is drawn see-through but as a boy constellation. The reader doesn't have to hunt for him, he's right there. Their friendship is sweet and touching and I wasn't sure where the plot was going. I was a little surprised by the ending.

Author's note includes information on the real constellation Eridamus and star Acmar plus weblinks to learn more about how to make a starfinder on the author's website and how to find a planetarium.

See the beautiful book trailer on the author's Instagram page
https://www.instagram.com/p/CF-Ec8lnNDK/

or browse the preview on Google
https://www.google.com/books/edition/...


message 38: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (last edited Dec 28, 2021 05:30PM) (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6244 comments Mod
I'm glad you liked it; I gave it five stars myself!


message 39: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1471 comments Cheryl wrote: "I'm glad you liked it; I gave it five stars myself!"

Glad you enjoyed it too. I didn't bring it home for the kids but oldest niece would have loved it when she was younger. Now she's a teen she'd be snarky about it but probably secretly enjoy it!


message 40: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6244 comments Mod
:smiles:


message 41: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2320 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "I absolutely loved StarcrossedStarcrossed by Julia Denos
Take a look at that gorgeous cover! It caught my eye on the library display shelf. This is a fictional tale about the ..."


I read it last February and gave it 3 stars. If I remember, I was not that entranced with the illustrations. I may have to check it out again and re-read it.


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