Play Book Tag discussion

12 views
March 2018: Autobiography > My Beloved World - Sotomayor - 4 stars

Comments Showing 1-3 of 3 (3 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Jgrace (new)

Jgrace | 2715 comments My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor
My Beloved World - Sotomayor
Audio performance by Rita Moreno
4 stars

Judge Sotomayor’s gives a very open, readable, account of her childhood, her years of higher education, her brief marriage, her years as a New York State prosecutor and her experience in corporate law. The book ends with her first appointment as a federal judge.

The first hispanic and third female appointed to the Supreme Court, Judge Sotomayor says she wrote the book to answer many questions. Chiefly, the question is how did she do it? Her parents were Puerto Rican Migrants. She grew up in the Bronx. Her father was an alcoholic who died when she was young. In elementary school she was diagnosed with childhood diabetes. Her life was in the ‘projects’. How did she move from this beginning to Princeton and Yale Law?

Like Sotomayor, I’m boomer. I laughed when she said that her childhood introduction to law was watching Perry Mason. I watched it with my father every week. But, it never occured to me that I might be a lawyer, let alone a judge. Judge Sotomayor describes herself as a child of unusual determination, out of necessity and personal inclination. She gives credit to a loving family, and especially acknowledges her mother’s emphasis on a good education.

Reading this autobiography, made me think of the similarities to J.D. Vance’s Hillbilly Elegy. They are a generation apart and from different ethnic backgrounds, but the questions are similar. Why me? How did I succeed when so many others fail? Vance seemed to give credit to lucky chances. His grandparents were there for him; his sister was a constant support. But, I think he gave himself less credit for his own personal effort. Sotomayor doesn’t discount the influence of family and ethnic history. She values and embraces it. She also speaks of her personal effort and ambition to higher achievement. She knows that she is a role model. I felt that this book was very much directed to a young audience. It has a bit of a soapbox message, ‘I did it. You can too.’

This was a good audiobook. Sotomayor reads the prologue herself and I loved listening to Rita Moreno read the rest of the book. (Echoes of West Side Story, I had go watch the dance routines.) I also had a hardback copy. The photographs added to my enjoyment of the text.


message 2: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 5539 comments I also listened to the audio, and also rated it 4 stars.

But I was skeptical about her statements as to how clueless she was about "summa cum laude" and "Phi Beta Kappa. I came from a similar background to hers, and even though I was NOT at an Ivy League university by the time I was a senior in college (1971) I certainly knew these terms.


message 3: by Jgrace (new)

Jgrace | 2715 comments Book Concierge wrote: "I also listened to the audio, and also rated it 4 stars.

But I was skeptical about her statements as to how clueless she was about "summa cum laude" and "Phi Beta Kappa. I came from a similar back..."


:) I thought that was believable. I was the first in my family to graduate from college and I was clueless in a similar way. I found it harder to believe how she 'knew' that her father's drinking was an illness, and other early, overly mature childhood awarness.
But it is hard to recreate childhood thoughts.


back to top