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Hunter's Horn
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Group Reads: Pre-1980 > Final Impressions: Hunter’s Horn: April 2018

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message 1: by Tom, "Big Daddy" (new)

Tom Mathews | 2555 comments Mod
Comments on this board are made with the assumption that readers have finished the book and may include spoilers.


message 2: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new) - rated it 4 stars

Diane Barnes | 3972 comments Mod
I finished this afternoon. I usually write reviews immediately on finishing a book, but I need to gather my thoughts for awhile on this one. It's gotten under my skin.


message 3: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new) - rated it 4 stars

Diane Barnes | 3972 comments Mod
OK, here it is, for what it's worth.
Here is a review by Diane: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 4: by Janice (JG) (new)

Janice (JG) | 121 comments Good review, Diane.

My question is, is there a sequel? Because it sure as heck begs for one, and I'm having a very difficult time leaving this family behind. I need to know how Suse is doing.

Arnow must have suffered poverty in her life at some point. I don't know how she can engage the reader so thoroughly in the trials and tribulations of a family's poverty as she has done in both this book and The Dollmaker. Shoes. How many pairs of shoes do you own? It occurs to me that shoes could be the measure of a person's well-being.

The anti-climatic killing of King Devil was done perfectly... not a male, but a vixen, and Nunn was nowhere around to bask in the moment. Women provide the strength needed for a family to endure and survive. Arnow's message is the same, and its loud and clear.


message 5: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new) - rated it 4 stars

Diane Barnes | 3972 comments Mod
Unfortunately, there is no sequel. My forward tells me that she wrote 3 novels about these mountain people. The first was Mountain Path, then Hunters Horn, and The Doll Maker was the third. She was exploring the way that roads made such an impact on people's lives. I am having a hard time letting go of Suse as well. I choose to think that Mark married her, took her to Detroit, and she was able to get some sort of education and get out of that cycle of downtrodden women.
I agree that the killing of King Devil was perfectly done. Nunn wasn't involved, although his dogs were. The fact that it was a vixen was such an ironic way to point out the strength of females in general.


message 6: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new) - rated it 4 stars

Diane Barnes | 3972 comments Mod
My forward also says that We now had four children, two of whom died as babies. Chapter 30, with Sue Annie and Millie trying to save Doddie's life, was cut out by the publishers in the original edition, because they thought their readers would find it too hard to take, and because of Sue Annie's comments about religion, but it was taken from Arnow's experiences losing her own children.


message 7: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new) - rated it 4 stars

Diane Barnes | 3972 comments Mod
I just went to check on availability of Mountain Path. It is out of print, and the cheapest copy on Abebooks was $26.00. But Amazon Kindle has an ebook for $9.99, so I just bought it.


message 8: by Lawyer, "Moderator Emeritus" (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lawyer (goodreadscommm_sullivan) | 2699 comments Mod
Diane wrote: "I just went to check on availability of Mountain Path. It is out of print, and the cheapest copy on Abebooks was $26.00. But Amazon Kindle has an ebook for $9.99, so I just bought it."

Although I have only reached the half way point in Hunter's Horn, I am captivated by the life of the Bellew family, particulary the strength of the Bellew women. I have followed your lead, Diane, and ordered the Kindle edition of Mountain Path. I have a copy of The Dollmaker and hope it soon becomes a Trail Read. Although The Dollmaker is often considered Arnow's most notable work, Arnow considered Hunter's Horn her best work. I am mesmerized by this book. Interesting how coming change is reflected by FDR' New Deal programs, the AAA and the WPA.


message 9: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new) - rated it 4 stars

Diane Barnes | 3972 comments Mod
I have a mass market paperback of The Dollmaker on my shelf, from years ago when I first read it. It would be great to have a reason to re-read it.


message 10: by Janice (JG) (new)

Janice (JG) | 121 comments Diane wrote: "I have a mass market paperback of The Dollmaker on my shelf, from years ago when I first read it. It would be great to have a reason to re-read it."

I read it just a year or so ago, and it's too soon for a re-read... the hardships were too frustrating for me.


Dustincecil | 175 comments SO many big moments here, all masterfully strung together, with the story of a fox hunt, and the people she just happens to be devilin'. The women were the absolute heart and soul of this book. I loved when Nunn acknowledged that the hounds were essentially Milly's- that she kept the home and hearth centered.

In my dream sequel Suse would take up with SueAnnie and be the next granny woman. She was, afterall a proven cusser at a young age...

Really looking forward to The Dollmaker.


message 12: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new) - rated it 4 stars

Diane Barnes | 3972 comments Mod
My dream sequel has Suse getting out of there into the outer world and getting an education. Too bad granny women are no more, their common sense and herbal knowledge was pretty invaluable.


message 13: by Janice (JG) (new)

Janice (JG) | 121 comments Diane wrote: "My dream sequel has Suse getting out of there into the outer world and getting an education. Too bad granny women are no more, their common sense and herbal knowledge was pretty invaluable."

Yes, that's my dream sequel also... and there was that moment when Suse was sitting in the woods (on Pilot Rock?) when she knew she would leave that place. I put stock in moments like those.


message 14: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new) - rated it 4 stars

Diane Barnes | 3972 comments Mod
I thought the defining moment in this book was not when the Fox was finally killed, which was anti-climactic, but rather that it was a pregnant female. That spoke volumes, and pointed out the strength and courage of the women in this book, always undervalued by the men, but, in reality, the very ones that made everything else happen.


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