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message 1: by Heather, Moderator (last edited Mar 25, 2018 11:52AM) (new)

Heather | 8385 comments

Peter Paul Rubens
1618


message 2: by Heather, Moderator (last edited Mar 25, 2018 11:52AM) (new)

Heather | 8385 comments

Caravaggio
1596

The first version (1596) is also known as Murtula, after poet Gaspare Murtola (d. 1624), who wrote of it: "Flee, for if your eyes are petrified in amazement, she will turn you to stone."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medusa_...


message 3: by Heather, Moderator (last edited Mar 25, 2018 11:55AM) (new)

Heather | 8385 comments

a Flemish painter
ca. 1600
Uffizi Gallery.

(First erroneously attributed to Leonardo da Vinci)


message 4: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8385 comments

Bernini
1640s


message 5: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Gross, grotesque and grisly. Not great for soothing the psyche.


message 6: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Caravaggio´s piece is the most effective by far in striking a bit of fear.


message 7: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Heather, you gotta stop watching those horror flics.


message 8: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8385 comments Geoffrey wrote: "Gross, grotesque and grisly. Not great for soothing the psyche."

Agree. Especially Rubens. Just disgusting, but realistic. Great work of art!


message 9: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8385 comments Geoffrey wrote: "Caravaggio´s piece is the most effective by far in striking a bit of fear."

Totally! Her face is just scary! I wouldn't want to encounter her, head or not!


message 10: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8385 comments Geoffrey wrote: "Heather, you gotta stop watching those horror flics."

haha! I can't stand horror films, I already get nightmares! But art is art and I think this theme is interesting anyway. Personally, I think Francis Bacon is scarier. His art just freaks me out.

Thank you for your comments, Geoffrey!


message 11: by Amalie (new)

Amalie  | 157 comments Heather wrote: "Geoffrey wrote: "Caravaggio´s piece is the most effective by far in striking a bit of fear."

Totally! Her face is just scary! I wouldn't want to encounter her, head or not!"


As scary as she may appear in the myths, how she turned into the snake-headed monster is even scarier. I think her appearance is a symbol of her pain and rage.

In stories, she used to be a beautiful woman who served as a virgin priestess to the goddess Athena. Men who found her attractive had to remain content to simply admire her beauty from a distance but not Poseidon. He raped her in the sacred temple of Athena. Afterwards she could no longer serve Athena. Worst still, she wasn’t eligible to accept a suitor.

When Athena found out about the desecration of her temple, she cursed Medusa (she should have cursed her uncle instead). And men no longer wanted to sought her for her beauty. If a man approaches her, he would turn to stone ( means, he would die).

And if you think about it, in stories, Medusa's victims had always been men.

I'd like to see how she is painted by a female artist.


message 12: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8385 comments Amalie wrote: "Heather wrote: "Geoffrey wrote: "Caravaggio´s piece is the most effective by far in striking a bit of fear."

Totally! Her face is just scary! I wouldn't want to encounter her, head or not!"

As sc..."


Thank you, Amalie! I guess I only knew half of that myth. Thank you for expounding on it! Interesting, I love Greek mythology!


message 13: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments That is a tale a bit misogynist.


message 14: by Amalie (new)

Amalie  | 157 comments Geoffrey wrote: "That is a tale a bit misogynist."

Geffrey, I think it's a recurring element in Greek myths. Despite having goddesses, there's a lot of sexual violence towards female in these tales.

Zeus raped Europa in a shape of a bull, he violated Leda in a form of a swan, in another story there was something of a cow ( that guy seemed to have had some serious problems).
Even Athena was harressed by her half-brother, Hephaestus. Theseus kidnapped and "raised" young Helen ( this is a 'Humbert -Lolita' tale ). Persephone was kidnapped and raped by Hades, her own uncle... these are the ones I remember. The list is almost endless.


message 15: by Amalie (new)

Amalie  | 157 comments Eureka!’ I finally found a painting of Medusa by a female artist!



Medusa 2017
Irene Veltman
oil on brich panel
35 x 45 cm
Private Collection


message 16: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1905 comments What fun it must have been to paint that one.


message 17: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8385 comments Amalie wrote: "Eureka!’ I finally found a painting of Medusa by a female artist!

Medusa 2017
Irene Veltman
oil on brich panel
35 x 45 cm
Private Collection"


Great find, Amalie!

Her eyes are incredible! So realistic!
I like how in this particular painting that the female medusa is actually portrayed as a young, beautiful woman maybe that she once was. And interesting take on the theme by a female artist.


message 18: by Heather, Moderator (last edited Apr 02, 2019 09:36AM) (new)

Heather | 8385 comments

Medusa
Józef Mehoffer


message 19: by Inkspill (new)

Inkspill (runinkspill) | 33 comments The variety is interesting. Reubens & Caravaggio's Medusa leans to the horror. The Flemish and Bernini have a captive look. Veltman and Mehoffer have gone against the grain and concentrated on the beauty, which unlike the first four changes the narrative, or rather Ovid (in his Metamorphoses) reminds us how Medusa, once beautiful, angered Athena for being raped by Poseidon and was transformed to a Gorgon.

To my modern eyes a story that leaves me speechless, so it’s nice that Veltman and Mehoffer’s paintings breakaway from the stereotype.


message 20: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8385 comments Inkspill wrote: "The variety is interesting. Reubens & Caravaggio's Medusa leans to the horror. The Flemish and Bernini have a captive look. Veltman and Mehoffer have gone against the grain and concentrated on the ..."

You're right, Inkspill! I didn't notice that they were so different from "the stereotype" until you just pointed that out. When we think of paintings or other art of Medusa, we think of the horror, the ugliness of her face and snakes. But, yes, she was once beautiful. Sometimes one needs to know the myth a bit.

Thank you for bringing that up!


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