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Bulletin Board > Ebook Growth Stagnating

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message 1: by Gary (new)

Gary "Once thought destined to reach 50% or 80% of all book buying and reading in the U.S., ebooks have stalled out on their way up to higher altitude.

According to a new study from the Book Industry Study Group, for the past year or so, the share of all new ebooks sold — both in units and dollars — has been flat at about 30% and just under 15%, respectively."

Full article, with charts:

http://www.digitalbookworld.com/2013/...


message 2: by Sarah (new)

Sarah It seems like everybody I know is using e-books. Or close to it.


message 3: by Renee E (new)

Renee E We haven't really had any huge blockbuster bestsellers yet this year, not like the Twilight, 50 Shades, etc. runs.

There are too many variables.


message 4: by Ken (new)

Ken Doggett (kendoggett) There does seem to be a glut of ebooks available. Everybody and his/her brother/sister fancies him/herself a writer. Today I went through a ton of free ebooks on Amazon, looking at the blurbs and the reviews, and I didn't find a single one worth reading--even at that price. Takes way too much time to sift through the garbage in search of that diamond.


message 5: by Angela (new)

Angela Dossett (whisperingwillo) Ken wrote: "There does seem to be a glut of ebooks available. Everybody and his/her brother/sister fancies him/herself a writer. Today I went through a ton of free ebooks on Amazon, looking at the blurbs an..."

I, occasionally go thru Amazon's list for books, but found it tedious at times. I've found sites regarding ebooks:price/description/and so forth that makes it easier for me. I've had great success in finding books that capture my reading interest.


message 6: by Shomeret (new)

Shomeret | 138 comments I download an average of five e-books a week, but I mainly read print books from the library. If I can get it from the library, I will do that even if the e-book is free or very cheap.


message 7: by S. (new)

S. Aksah | 387 comments Its the economy!


message 8: by Jim (last edited Jul 24, 2014 09:42PM) (new)

Jim Vuksic | 1036 comments It should come as no surprise that the percentage of e-Books, within the total spectrum of formats - traditional print, audio books on CD, and audio book downloads - has stalled at approximately 30%.

In this age of independently and self-published books, anyone with a keyboard and internet access may publish a book and, for whatever reason, the vast majority of indie and SPA books are available only in e-Book format, most of which, the authors choose to offer for free or for only one or two dollars. The end result is a glut in the market.

Even the average 15% royalty, paid to contracted authors by mainline publishers, for traditional print, e-books and audio books yields a better, and therefore, more attractive, profit; since the average price charged for a 100,000-word novel is $8.00 for an e-Book, $15.00 for an audio download, $20.00 for a paperback, and $35.00 for an audio book on CD. This incentive attracts talented writers.

That, along with the fact that mainline publishers contract major distributors, such as Ingram Books and Spring Arbor, that provide access to more commercial outlets, inevitably results in more sales.


message 9: by Scott (new)

Scott Skipper | 49 comments It's simply boneheaded to pay $15 for a hard copy when you can get an eBook for five or six. I buy an eBook about every five to seven days. In this household we have two Nooks, a Kindle and an iPad for reading devices. Barring the collapse of the internet, I doubt eBooks are going away anytime soon.


message 10: by Danielle (last edited Jul 25, 2014 01:55PM) (new)

Danielle Freeman | 8 comments Scott wrote: "It's simply boneheaded to pay $15 for a hard copy when you can get an eBook for five or six. I buy an eBook about every five to seven days. In this household we have two Nooks, a Kindle and an iP..."

Not necessarily. There are still individuals (myself included) who prefer print books over ebooks for a number of reasons. For me, the main one is the experinece of holding an actual paper book in your hand as opposed to a thin plastic device. There's the smoothness of the cover, the heft of the volume, the texture of the pages, the subtle scent of paper and binding glue (especially with books that have aged a bit)...there is nothing else like it in the world to me--and probably many others as well.

While I agree with you that ebooks aren't going away any time soon (since they appeal to people who are constantly on the go, people with limited storage space, and those who are intimidated by the thickness of any print book over 100 pages long) I also believe that print books aren't going anywhere any time soon either. Different strokes for different folks and all that. ^_^


message 11: by Auden (last edited Jul 25, 2014 02:10PM) (new)

Auden Johnson (audens_dark_treasury) | 13 comments Danielle wrote: There are still individuals (myself included) who prefer print books over ebooks for a number of reasons..."

I agree. Print books aren't going anywhere. Although, I buy mostly ebooks because of the cost and convenience, I've met many people who prefer print books for the reason's you've mentioned. People enjoy holding a book and turning pages. I like print books because there's something comforting about being surrounded by books.

I'm not surprised ebook growth has slowed. I doubt ebook sales will drop though. We haven't had the next big thing to make people binge buy ebooks. Amazon's Kindle Unlimited might do the trick. I don't know how those will count as ebook sales though.


message 12: by Renee E (new)

Renee E If I had an e-reader of some sort I'd be buying e-books for most of my new reading, saving my physical books space for much loved and re-read tomes, hardbacks and some mass-market paperbacks. E-books would replace paperbacks for me.

My house is an old, smallish Victorian cottage and storage space is sparse! Plus, e-books don't have to be dusted, don't get damp and don't come apart after they've been read a few times. It would take some getting used to, I'm sure, but evolution marches on.


message 13: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) This is inevitable as you begin to get closer to market saturation, it doesn't necessarily imply that people are "going back" to print books. You may be beginning to encounter markets that are just not primary readers (gamers, skateboarders, meth addicts, etc.), or the digital illiterate (grandma), or just the people who are going to stubbornly resist the change as long as possible. A lot of people have tablets that never, or hardly ever, read a book of any sort.


message 14: by Ed (new)

Ed Morawski | 221 comments People! That study was conducted a year ago!
The study, the latest version of the Book Industry Study Group’s Consumer Attitudes Toward E-Book Reading, was conducted in August 2013 among 1,048 Americans aged 13 and up.

There's no way ebook sales are at just 30% of the market! I bet it's closer to 60% by now.


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